Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS2570934 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 9, 1951
Filing dateMay 9, 1947
Priority dateMay 9, 1947
Publication numberUS 2570934 A, US 2570934A, US-A-2570934, US2570934 A, US2570934A
InventorsCharles T Foster
Original AssigneeCharles T Foster
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Toilet deodorizer
US 2570934 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

(3. T. FOSTER TOILET DEODORIZER Filed May 9, 1947 FIG. 1.

Oct; 9, 195] Ill/I IIIIII IIIII FIG. 2. I

I attorney) Patented Oct. 9, 1951 UNITED S TATES PATENT O FFICE TOILET DEODORIZER Charles '1. Foster, Overland, Mo.

Application May 9, 1947, Serial No. 746,999

2 Claims.

This invention relates to improvements in a deodorizer particularly adapted for use in water closet flush tanks of the types now generally employed.

An object of the invention is to provide a container particularly well adapted for disc-like cakes of deodorant and disinfectant and of a shape which will not obstruct the inflow and exit of water-used as an afterfill followinga flushing operation of the flush tank.

Another object is to provide such a container with a closure which permits the ready insertion of a deodorant cake and inspection of the container, which also confines the water path through the container rather than to permit some of it to flow over into the flush tank and prevent rapid evaporation of the deodorant as occurs in the open. 1

Another object of the invention is to provide a deodorant container in the afterfill water conduit through which the water flows so that it will not run out when the toilet is flushed but is retained and so as to flow into. the bowl as the tank is filling up thereby effecting a saving of the deodorant and providing a more effective afterfill.

Another object of'the invention is to provide a relatively flat deodorant container which "will fit in flush tanks below the flush tank cover and properly comply with all plumbing regulations and health requirements.

Further objects, details and advantages of my invention will appear in the following detailed description, of the preferred embodiment of my invention taken in connection with the accompanying drawings, forming a part thereof and illustrating a deodorizer which has proven highly satisfactory in practice being simple to install and effective in saving the deodorant material.

In the drawings:

'Fig. 1 is a vertical sectional view of a high type of flush tank with a deodorizer, in accordance with my invention, applied thereto.

Fig. 2 is a similar fragmentary section of a low type flush tank showing the application of the deodorizer.

Fig. 3 is a plan view of the deodorizer container with its lid removed.

Fig. 4 is a vertical sectional view thereof taken substantially on line 3-3 of Fig. 3.

Fig. 5 is a horizontal sectional view taken on line 4-4 of Fig. 4 showing a detail of the adjustable supporting clamp for the container.

Referring to the drawings, Fig. 1 illustrates a high type of flush tank Ill having the usual fittings, flush valve II with its overflow pipe [2,

2 water pressure'inletpipe l 3, a float operated valve M which is considerably below the top of the overflow pipe 12 and outlet pipe l5 for fillingthe flush tank. In place of the afterfill pipe which usually-extends from the float operated valve into the overflow pipe 12, valve I4 is provided with ;a short vertically extending pipe l'fi which may-replace the usual afterflll .pipe or only a portion thereof, thepo'rtion extending to the overflow pipe being out 01f, and connected by-a pipe or tube ll of rubber or the like with the deodorizer The ":low" type flush tan-k shown in Fig. '2 is of the same general construction except. that valve mechanism Hi is in a higher plane with respect to the top of the overflow pipe 12*, making it necessary to dispose the deodorizer 18 in. much higher position above the overflow pipe 12 than in the high type flush tank shown in Fig. 1.

The deodorizer i8, and'details thereof illustrated in Figs. -3, 4 and 5, is .a-preferred highly satisfactory form, being a relatively :flat receptacle it with upwardly extending side walls providing a generally 'tziangvlarstructure in plan, with rounded corners particularly adapted for -'a disc- 'like cake 2.0 of deodorant leaving relatively large spaces at portions of the side of the deodorant cake to accommodate water from an inlet pipe 2:! in one of thespacesand free entrance of water into an outlet pipe 22 inanother space, which are beyond the deodorant cake, so as .not to :be :obstructed for inflow and exit of the water.

Referring to Fig. 4 it will be seen that inlet pipe 2|, which as shown in Figs. 1 and 2 is connected with pipe I 6 by a more or less flexible tube I1, is comparatively small being subject to flow of water under some pressure from valve mechanism [4. Container I9 is provided with a downwardly extending female nipple 23 into which a larger diameter and much larger outlet pipe 22 is threadedly received thus providing an outlet which will allow the water in container Hi to freely pass therefrom into overflow pipe l2, or I2 as shown in Figs. 1 and 2.

Threaded nipple 23 above the upper end of pipe 22 also provides a mounting for flaring coil spring 24 of non-rusting material, the convolutions of which are slightly spaced and provide a protector or strainer to hold pieces of the deodorant cake from passing and a slight deterrent to the flow of water from the container.

The deodorant cake 20 is protected from the air, and likewise the container closed to prevent the overflow of water from the container into the flush tank, by means of a cover 25 the sides 26 adjustable along outlet pipe 22, provides a sturdy mounting for the deodorizer, in a low position as :shown in Fig. 1 or a high position as illustrated in Fig. 2, in both cases well below the plane of the top of flush tank I0, or 10*. Clamp 21 has a depending element 28 closely adjacent to outlet pipe 22 so that when the deodorizer is installed in the flush tank, the upper portion of the overflow pipe 12, or [2 will be straddled and gripped between the two and thereby hold the deodorizer in proper position in the flush tank.

It will be seen that I have provided a deodorizer which may be quickly assembled in any typical flushing apparatus and while I have described a preferred and'highly satisfactory form of deodorant container, I do not want to be limited to particular form or shape thereof as obviously other forms clearly fall within the scope of my invention.

I claim:

1. A deodorizer for water closet flush tanks of the high or low type or the like including the usual water supply and afterfill flushing and valve and overflow pipes mechanisms, said deodorizer comprising a container for cake type of deodorizing material so shaped as to provide spaces beyond the peripheral edges of a deodorant cake when placed therein, a cover for the top of said container substantially sealing the" same as a closure for the deodorant cake, inlet conduit connecting means between the bottom of the container communicating'therewith in one of said spaces beyond the peripheral edges of the cake and the afterfill of the water supply valve of the flush tank, an outlet pipe of substantially larger diameter than that of said inlet conduit extending downwardly from the deodorant container communicating therewith in another of said spaces beyond the peripheral edges of the deodorant cake, and a vertically adjustable clamp 4 on the outlet pipe below the container for securing the outlet pipe in the flush tank overflow pipe with the deodorant container in a vertically ad- Justed position above the same.

2. A deodorizer for water closet flush tanks of the high or low type or the like including the usual water supply and afterfill flushing and valve and overflow pipes mechanisms, said deodorizer comprising a container for cake type of deodorizing material so shaped as to provide spaces beyond the peripheral edges of a deodorant cake when placed therein, a cover for the top of said container substantially sealing the same as a closure for the deodorant cake, inlet conduit connecting means between the bottom of the container communicating therewith in one of said spaces beyond the peripheral edges of the cake and the afterfill of the water supply valve of the flush tank, an outlet pipe of substantially larger diameter than that of said inlet conduit extending downwardly from the deodorant container communicating therewith in another of said spaces beyond the peripheral edges of the deodorant cake, a strainer extending from the upper end of said outlet pipe upwardly in the container preventing pieces of the deodorant cake from passing from the container and slightly deterring the flow of water therefrom, and a vertically adjustable clamp on the outlet pipe below the container for securing the outlet pipe in the flush tank overflow pipe with the deodorant container in a vertically adjusted position above the same.

CHARLES T. FOSTER.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

, UNITED STATES PATENTS 7 Date

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US312296 *Mar 31, 1883Feb 17, 1885 scott
US926704 *Jul 22, 1908Jun 29, 1909Lee Improvement CompanyStrainer.
US960092 *May 29, 1909May 31, 1910William Olin HunterSafety-clip for pens and pencils.
US1170387 *Jun 2, 1915Feb 1, 1916William V AndrewsRetainer for disinfectants.
US1621737 *Nov 9, 1925Mar 22, 1927Moore JohnToilet flushing means
US1664736 *Oct 18, 1926Apr 3, 1928Creamer Isaac PSoap box
US2424174 *Mar 6, 1944Jul 15, 1947Vale BaldwinToilet disinfector
IT366581B * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2697841 *Feb 7, 1952Dec 28, 1954Foss P CollinsToilet disinfecting device
US2853715 *Jun 4, 1956Sep 30, 1958Ratcliffe Cecil FAutomatic deodorant dispenser for toilets
US3105245 *Aug 15, 1962Oct 1, 1963Donald B FinkbinerApparatus for forming and delivering chemicaled solutions to toilet bowls
US3228040 *May 15, 1961Jan 11, 1966Grover C CurrieAdditive feeding means
US3290698 *Aug 10, 1964Dec 13, 1966Russell J JoynerBathroom deodorizer
US3311931 *Apr 9, 1964Apr 4, 1967Allan J AshtonToilet deodorizer
US3952339 *Sep 23, 1974Apr 27, 1976Henkel & Cie G.M.B.H.Automatic toilet cleaning device
US5745928 *Apr 30, 1997May 5, 1998Armanno, Sr.; FrankToilet bowl dispensing system
US5778459 *Feb 10, 1997Jul 14, 1998Guerin; Phillip M.Method and apparatus for injecting chemicals into the water of a toilet bowl
US5815850 *Jan 28, 1997Oct 6, 1998Shon; Adrian Y.Method and apparatus for chemical dispensing into toilet bowl
US5987655 *Aug 13, 1998Nov 23, 1999Smet; Stephen J.Flush tank water conditioner
Classifications
U.S. Classification4/225.1, 422/263
International ClassificationE03D9/02
Cooperative ClassificationE03D9/037
European ClassificationE03D9/03D4