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Publication numberUS2572780 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 23, 1951
Filing dateNov 5, 1948
Priority dateNov 5, 1948
Publication numberUS 2572780 A, US 2572780A, US-A-2572780, US2572780 A, US2572780A
InventorsTackenberg Richard C
Original AssigneeTackenberg Richard C
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Merchandise cart
US 2572780 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

. Oct. 23, 1951 R. c. TACKENBERG 2,572,730

MERCHANDISE CART 5, 1948 2 swans-swam 1 Filed Nov.

1N VEN TOR.

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Oct. 23; 1951 R. c. TACKENBERG 2,572,780

MERCHANDISE CART Filed Nov. 5, 1948 Y I 2 SHEETSSHEET 2 11 ill: -nmlllllm ea; 61 w all l l l i J! j 3! J90 v x; I a if a I INVENTOR.

o C. Mkfi BY Patented Oct. 23, 1951 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE MERCHANDISEGART R c d -T ckenberg, cam. Ohio Application November 5, 1948, Serial No. 58,487

This invention relates to a hand truck designed primarily for use in stocking the shelves of stores, such as retail food markets. The structure is of particular value in self-service stores in which the merchandise is displayed on shelves accessible to purchasers, the articles price marked so that the purchaser may walk about the store and help himself to th desired items. The truck is used to transport the incoming stock to the desige natedshelf areas at which point the items are unpacked from their shipping cartons, price marked and .stacked in orderly fashion upon the classified shelf area for convenient selection by the patrons.

Keeping the shelves well stocked is vital to the successful operation of such stores. As various stock items are depleted, they must be replaced, often while the store is open for business. Since the aisle space between the shelves frequently is restricted, the restocking operation obstructs the passageways and interferes with the normal flow of trade. In the ,case of articles shipped in cartons, the practice has been to price mark the items individually and repack them in the cartons, later to transport the carton tothe shelf area to stack the articles on the shelfbut this involves double handling.

The present hand truck has been designed to render this work more speedy-and efficient and constitutes a platformtruck having anelevated work table such that the cartoned articles as received may be loaded upon the truck platform, transported to the shelf section, placed upon the work table and marked as a single operation incident to stacking the items upon the shelf. This procedure has been found to be speedier and more eflicient than the former, since it involves merely a single handling operation. :For convenience, the structure includes a set of price marking tools contained in a receptacle closely adjacent the Work table and the work table proper is located at an elevation approximating the store shelves so that the articles maybe marked and transferred directly to the shelf. The structure further. contemplates a salvage rack to retain the cartons as they are emptied so that the aisles are not obstructed by empty cartons and time need vnot be lost in disposing of them.

Briefly described, the truck constitutes a wheeled platform with a standard .or uprightrising vertically at one ,end to stabilize the; ta ke ca s, the s nda d se vin as a p sher an as a mou Q-r t rk t b andsa ase rack. n t ela e eli-se c ts ores it i as s i i a S ver l utilityr rgckssqthat;rant

.5 Cla ms. (01- 2891-4 ous-parts of the store may be restocked at the ether.

Theobjectivesof the-invention therefore, have been to provide a utility truck structure which incorporates an extensible work table disposed at or near shelfheight so that the-usermay price mark the items COIlVBIlleIltlYilDOH the work-table and place them directly upon the store shelf as a-single operationgto provide a detachablesalvage rack for the empty cartons so that theymay be conveyed by the truck to avoid obstruction of the aisles and to design the structure in such manner that theindividual trucks will matewith each other in nested relationship for compact storage.

Various other features and advantages of the structure will be more fully-disclosed in'theac companying drawings illustrating a preferred embodiment of the invention.

In the drawings:

Figure 1 is a side elevation of the improved hand truck.

Figure 2 is an end elevation as projected from Figure 1, further illustrating the truck generally.

Figure 3 is a top plan view of the truck as projected from Figure 1, with a; portion of the truck platform removed to illustrateits construetion.

igu 4 i a front View il ustr t n th al a e ra k'a de hed frc th t u k- .F s-ure .5 a e ti na vi w take .onl p 5.

u e :2. etailing the st uctu the vertical.

t nd rd o th u k- Figure 6 is a s ec tiona l view taken on line 575. Figure detai th nestin keta ransement- F ure 7 i s an enlarged fragmentary side elervation of the upper portion of the truck standard, partially broken away to illustrate themountin arrangement for the work shelf, with i the shelf in its horizontal or operating position.

Fi ure B is a viewsimilar toFigure v illustrating the work shelf in its upended or inoperative Position.

F ur 9.1 r men ar s c i nal view aken line .s-ail ...s ratiu the m untin stru u of the work shelf with reference to the frame members of the vertical standard.

Figure 10 is a sectional view taken on line |-|0, Figure 1, illustrating the detachable mounting structure of the salvage rack.

Figure 11 is a sectional view taken on line |I| I, Figure 10, further detailing the detachable mounting arrangement of the salvage rack.

Figure 12 is a diagrammatic side view illustrating the manner in which several trucks may be stacked one upon another and nested for com-,

pact storage.

Figure 13 is a sectional view taken on line |3|3, Figure 12, further detailing thebrackets by means of which the standards are interlocked in nested relationship.

Generally described, the truck constitutes a base or platform I constructed preferably from sheet metal, having a marginal stiffening flange I6 bent downwardly around its edges as illustrated in Figure 1. A longitudinal rib H, extended lengthwise of the platform as shown in Figure'3, further strengthens and reinforces the top panel I8 of the platform. The rib I! may be secured by means of welding indicated at longitudinally to panel l8 and endwise to the margin I6. Other reinforcing ribs (not shown) may be installed crosswise of the platform depending upon load requirements and the sheet metal gauge utilized. The platform I5 is mounted upon truck wheels of commercial design, the rear wheels 2|2| being journalled upon shafts 22 carried by inverted U-shaped' brackets 2323 formed preferably from heavy gauge sheet metal stampings. Each of these includes a top plate 24 welded to the underside of the platform panel l8, as shown in Figure 1 to mount the brackets. The front end of the'truck platform is supported upon caster units 25-25 comprised of dirigible or rotatable brackets 262 6, having caster wheels 2'I2'I rotatably mounted upon shafts 28 carried by the brackets. The caster units 25 are of a commercial design and for this reason are not illustrated in detail. It will be noted in Figure 1 that the upper portion of each caster bracket is rotatably connected to a U-shaped top plate 30, which is welded to the panel I8 similar to the plate 24 for the rear wheels.

, The-truck is provided with a vertical standard or upright structure, indicated generally at 3| (Figure 1), which rises from the end of platform I5- and provides a stabilizer 'for the articles stacked upon the platform. The standard serves also as a handle for pushing thetruck about the store and swinging the standard in the appropriate direction as the truck is pushed steers the truck by operation of the casters.

The upright 3| is formed essentially from a pair of vertical channel irons 3232 .(Figures 5 and 6) secured to the end of the truck preferably by welding as at 33. These members are joined together, to provide a ladder like structure by a series of spacers 34 extending crosswise of the channel members and secured to the inner web 35 of the channel members by butt welding as at 36.. Upon the upper ends of the respective channel members is mounted a handle bar 31 which is secured to the upper ends of the channels by means of the horizontal extensions 3838 having their opposite ends welded as at 40 to the upper end of'the channel and to the handle bar 31.

The standard 32 is provided with a collapsible shelf 4|,located toward the upper end of the standard, which, in operation, assumes a 119 i" zontal position as shown in Figure 1. When the truck is fully loaded, this shelf may be folded to a vertical position as shown in broken lines. The work shelf or table consists of a panel 42 provided with an angular connecting portion 43 which is welded to the edge of the panel as at 44. The angular portion 43 is dimensioned to fit between the opening defined by the webs 35-35 of the vertical channels 32. Upon the opposite end of the angular portion 43 is welded a cross bar 45 which is arranged to engage the opposite webs of the channels 32-32 when the table is in its horizontal position as shown in Figure 7. The edge of the work table thus rests against one side of the channels while the extended ends 46-46 of bar 45 are in bearing engagement with the opposite webs of the channels to establish a wedging engagement relative to the channels to lock the table frictionally at a desired elevation. Thus, the table may be adjusted to a desirable elevation above the upper cross member 34 or it may rest upon the cross member in its lowermost position as shown. When it is desired to fold the work table out of the way, it is simply upended and the cross bar is slipped into the slot 4'! formed in the upper end of block 48 which is welded to the inner webs of the channels as shown in Figures 5 and 8. The slot is approximately the same width as the thickness of bar 45 so as to maintain the table securely in its vertical position. The table is removed entirely by tilting it laterally a sufiicient distance to clear the ends 46 of bar 45 with respect to the channels.

As shown in Figures 1 and 4, the standard 3| is provided also with a salvage rack 49 designed to receive the empty cartons in collapsed condition. This rack comprises a platform panel 50 formed of sheet metal and provided with a U- shaped vertical frame 5| formed from rod or bar stock bent in the shape of an inverted U as shown in Figure 4, and provided with horizontal end extensions 5252 formed by bending the lower ends of the frame laterally as shown in Figure 1. As detailed in Figures 10 and 11 the plate 50 is secured between the lateral members 52 preferably by welding as at 53. The opposite edges of the plate are provided with vertical flanges 5454 to stiffen the plate at right angles to the frame'extensions 52--52. The rack assembly is detachably mounted upon the standard 3| by means of hooks 5555 welded to the underside of base plate 50 as shown in Figures 10 and 11. The hooks include angular studs 56 engageable with a slot 51 formed in a plate 58 which is secured to the channels 32-32 by welding as at 59. By reason of the engagement of the studs 55 with the slot 57 combined with the engagement of the flange 54 against the standards 32, the assembly is locked in position as shown in Figure 11. The rack assembly may be detached by swinging the frame 5| toward the standard so as to release the binding engagement of the base plate against the standards, canting it laterally to disengage the hook studs 55 from the webs of the channels. The rack provides a convenient holder for the cartons as they are emptied and collapsed and for other waste materials incident t0 unpacking the merchandise.

As illustrated in Figure 12, the trucks are arranged to be stacked in nested relationship for compact storage when they are not in use. In order to maintain them in alignment the standard 3| of each truck is provided with an alignment bracket 60 (Figures 6 and 13). This E la/9155i constitutes the lowermost cross member 34 and is formed from a flat metal bar having its opposite ends bent angularly to provide limbs 6l-6|, braced by a return bend 62, the ends of which are Welded as at 63 to the bar 34 to form a triangle. As noted in Figure 6, the limbs 6 l--6l converge slightly toward each other and are spaced to nest snugly between the webs 3535 of an adjacent truck as shown in Figure 13. The bracket assembly is secured to the channels 3232 by means of welding as at 64. The support blocks 48 for the work table 4| occupy the same relative position at the upper end of the standard as the limbs GI and serve the same purpose. In order to maintain the several trucks in a nested relationship, elevating blocks 65 (Figure 12) may be provided. These maintain the platforms in an inclined plane so that the trucks remain in position by gravity.

If desired, the truck may be equipped with a tool box 66 to contain the price marking equipment and other tools and supplies utilized in stocking the shelves. The tool box includes angle brackets 616'l at opposite ends which are welded to the lateral handle extensions 38, as shown in Figures 3 and 7. The bottom 68 of the box is formed preferably from expanded metal as shown in Figure 3.

When the merchandise is packed in cardboard cartons, they are stacked upon the truck platform, often to the height of the standard 3| with the work shelf 4| folded up out of the way as shown in Figures 1 and 8. Suitable tools for opening the cartons and marking prices and the like on the items are carried in the tool box so that the user may mark the articles individually as they are removed from the cartons and placed upon the shelves. As the stack of cartons diminishes, the work table 42 may be extended so that the cartons may be placed upon it for convenience and efficiency in handling. Since this table extends in the same direction as the truck platform, there is no danger of overbalancing and upsetting the truck. When the trucks are not in use, they may be stacked as shown in Figure 12 for compact storage, in which case the work table 42 and salvage rack 52 are removed.

Having described my invention, I claim:

1. A utility truck comprising; a platform having a set of wheels for supporting the platform, an upright structure secured to one end of said platform, a work table adapted to be mounted upon said upright structure, said work table engageable against one side of the upright structure and having a connecting portion extending to the opposite side of the structure, a mounting bar secured to the connecting portion having end extensions engageable with the opposite side of the upright to establish a binding engagement with the upright to sustain the Work table in a horizontal position upon the upright overhanging the platform, and a support bracket secured to the upright structure adapted to receive said mounting bar to sustain the work table in a vertical position upon the standard to increase the capacity of the truck when the table is not in use.

2. A utility truck comprising; a platform supported by a set of wheels, an upright structure constituting a pair of vertical members secured to one end of the platform, a work table adapted to be mounted upon said upright structure, said table having its side edges configurated to embrace the vertical members in binding engagement when the table is in a horizontal position, a respective retainer block secured to said vertical members, said retainer block including vertical slots adapted to receive the edge of the table to maintain it in a vertical position when the same in upended to increase the capacity of the truck.

3. A utility truck comprising; a platform supported by a set of wheels, an upright structure constituting a pair of vertical members secured to one end of the platform, a Work table adapted to be mounted upon said upright structure, said table having a connecting portion adapted to fit between said vertical members, secured to the edge of said connecting portion, and overhanging the vertical members, the vertical members passing between the overhanging ends of the cross bar and the adjacent edge of the work table when the table is in a horizontal position to establish a binding engagement therewith and retainer blocks secured to said vertical members, said blocks including vertical slots adapted to receive said crossbar to maintain the work table in a vertical position when the same is upended.

4. A utility truck comprising; a platform supported by a set of wheels, an upright structure constituting a pair of vertical channel members secured to one end of the platform, brace bars extending between said channel members to secure the same together, a work table adapted to be mounted upon the upper end of said upright structure, said table having a connecting portion adapted to fit between said channel members, a cross bar secured to the edge of said connecting portion, the ends of said cross bar being adapted to engage the respective channel members and the adjacent edge of the work table adapted to engage the opposite side of said channel members, a brace bar disposed beneath the work table to support the same, a respective retainer block secured to said channel members, said retainer block including vertical slots adapted to receive said cross bar to maintain the work table in a vertical position when the same is upended.

5. A utility truck comprising; a platform supported by a set of wheels, an upright structure constituting a pair of vertical members secured to one end of the platform, a work table adapted to be mounted upon said upright structure, said table having its side edges configurated to embrace the vertical members in binding engagement when the table is in a horizontal position, retainer blocks secured to said vertical members, said blocks including vertical slots adapted to receive an edge of the table to maintain the table in a vertical position when the same is upended, said blocks being extended beyond the vertical members and arranged to fit between the vertical members of a duplicate utility truck to provide a nested engagement therewith whereby a plurality of trucks may be stacked one upon another in nested engagement.

RICHARD C. TACKENBERG.

REFERENCES CITED The Iollowing references are of record in the file or this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 672,921 Slingsby Apr. 30, 1901 1,171,343 Klok Feb. 8, 1916 1,410,373 Choate et al Mar. 21, 1922 1,585,834 Drinkwater May 25, 1926 1,750,639 Jones Mar. 18, 1930 2,130,334 Barber Sept. 20, 1938 2,212,053 Smith Aug. 20, 1940 a cross bar

Patent Citations
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2738201 *Oct 29, 1951Mar 13, 1956George M PrescottPlatform truck
US2837344 *Jan 6, 1956Jun 3, 1958Sylvan N GoldmanFolding baby seats for telescoping carts
US2860886 *Jul 29, 1955Nov 18, 1958Kurt H SchweitzerChild's seat for nesting carriers
US2862720 *Jan 14, 1957Dec 2, 1958Smith Ronald FHand trucks
US3039783 *Sep 22, 1959Jun 19, 1962Oscar M StanleySupermarket cart
US3241850 *Jul 1, 1963Mar 22, 1966Miller Herman IncStackable cart with removeable load supporting means
US3415532 *Apr 27, 1967Dec 10, 1968Arthur E. May Jr.Merchandising carrier
US3818655 *Aug 21, 1972Jun 25, 1974Thermo Kinetics IncConditioning unit with modular construction
US5080381 *Aug 6, 1990Jan 14, 1992Benjamin PerezTool tray with wheels
US5149115 *Oct 28, 1991Sep 22, 1992Tony SampedroCompact storage stroller
US6170678Aug 10, 1998Jan 9, 2001Recot, Inc.Modular display for consumer products
US6910710 *Dec 9, 2002Jun 28, 2005Trong NguyenChair carrier convertible cart
DE3242337A1 *Nov 16, 1982Dec 22, 1983Elopak OyCart
Classifications
U.S. Classification280/33.998, 248/241, 280/47.35, 108/57.15, 280/651, 211/134
International ClassificationB62B3/14, B62B3/02, B62B3/16
Cooperative ClassificationB62B3/16, B62B3/02, B62B3/1476
European ClassificationB62B3/16, B62B3/02