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Publication numberUS2572871 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 30, 1951
Filing dateJan 31, 1948
Priority dateJan 31, 1948
Also published asDE943831C
Publication numberUS 2572871 A, US 2572871A, US-A-2572871, US2572871 A, US2572871A
InventorsKline Bernard L
Original AssigneeWestern Union Telegraph Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Facsimile transmitting means and method of using same
US 2572871 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

- B. L. KLINE Oct. 30, 1951 FACSIMILE TRANSMITTING MEANS AND METHOD OF USING SAME Filed Jan. 51

INVENTOR.

ATTOR N EY fatented Oct. 30, $951 FACSIMI I JE TRANSMITTING MEANS METHOD OF USING SAME Bernard L. Kline, Manhasset, N. Y., assignor to The Western Union Telegraph, Company, New

* York, N. Y., a corporation of New York ApplicationJanuary 31, 1948, SerialNo 5,568

This invention relates to the telegraphic facsimile transmission of messages from a transmitting blank by means of an electrical stylus which scans the blank, and more particularly to a novel facsimile transmitting blank and amore facile and inexpensive method of preparing and utilizing a facsimile transmitting blank for producing facsimile signals; it

A considerable number of firms and business houses which have need for prompt and efficient telegraph service do not have a sufliciently high daily volume of telegraph business to justify the costof installing and maintaining send-receive telegraph printers or conventional facsimile sendreceive apparatus in their oflices, and yet their telegraph business is too large to rely on messenger'pickup and delivery for telegrams transmitted and received. The present invention enables transmitting and/or recording facsimile apparatus to be employed for such classes of service,' which apparatus is suificiently simple and inexpensive as to justifythe use 'of the same to handle the business of patrons having comparatively small telegraph accounts. Moreover, the invention provides a facsimiletransmitting blank which may be utilized not only with alternating current pickup but also with low voltage direct current pickup. The-blank may be prepared with a minimum of skill and experience; any typist can prepare the facsimile transmitting blank in the same manner as in making carbon copies of letters on a typewriter,simultaneously with the production of a ribbon copy and carbon copies of a "messages A standard" typewriter, without any changes or additions thereto and without requiring special ribbons or inking devices, may be used to prepare the transmitting blank by usual typing "methods. For thereception of facsimile messages on the transmitter recorder conventional electrosensitive recording blanks may be utilized. l '-Amon the objects of -the*-invention are to produce facsimile transmitting signals ina more facile and inexpensivemanner; to enable simple, low cost apparatus to be employed both for the transmission and reception of telegrams or other messages; to prepare a suitable inexpensive facsimile transmitting blank by conventional writing or typing procedure; to enable the production of an original and, if desired, the usual carbon copies, of either a handwritten or a typewritten message simultaneously with the preparation of a facsimile transmitting b1ankcon-" taining the message; and to producesuch a blank which may be used for the repeated transmission or retransmission of a facsimilemessage.

Other objects and advantages will be apparent from the. following detailed description of theiinvention, taken in connection with the accompanying drawings, in which; r 1;

9 Claims. (Cl. 178-5);

' Fig. 1 diagrammatically a send-receive facsimile system suitable for utilizing transmitting blanks prepared in accordance with the invention; i

Fig. 2 shows a method of writing by hand to produce a transmitting blank of the character disclosed herein; and 8 Fig. 3 shows how the transmittingblank may be prepared on a conventional typewriter.

In the instant method of transmitting facsimile signals representing the handwritten or typewritten message, the characters or other subject matter are formed by impressing a suitable dielectric substance, having certain characteristics hereinafter set forth, upon selected elemental areas of a transmitting blank which may comprise a sheetof paper or other suitablefiexible material. In accordance with one embodiment, the paper sheet, or at le'ast the transmitting surface portion thereof, is inherently a good paper or the surface thereof, after which the characters comprising the message are impressed on the surface of the blankso that they form insulating characters on a conductive background. I

In another embodiment; the blank initially may be nonconductive, as in the case of ordinary paper s tock, and after the insulating characters areimpressed thereon, the blank is made con: ductive by applying thereto a suitable electrolyte prior to or during a transmitting operation. The nature oflthe material of which the impressed characters are composed is such thatit repels the electrolyte and causes the characters to remamas insulating elemental areas on a conductive background during transmission of the mes sage. In both ,of the foregoing embodiments, so long as the transmittingstylus is in contact with the conducting background of the blank during a scanning operation, signal current will flow in the stylus circuit, but whenothe stylus is traversing the dielectric characters, the stylus circuit is effectively opened and no signal current flows therein. The facsimile signals transmitted are in accordancewith the alternate presence-and absence, of current flow in the stylus circuit as the blank is being scanned. These signal currents are; amplified or are caused to modulate or control other currents to produce increasedsignal strength; preferably, although not necessarily, the signals are passed through a signal inverter in order. that at'the receiving end the recorded message will be a black on white copy of th V messageon the transmitting blank. 7 I

apparatus at stations A and B interconnected by a transmission line L. Station A may be" lo:

.cated, for example, ina patrons office, and sta tion B either at another patrons office or it may represent the receiving position of: a telegraph company which retransmits the received-message over commercial lines to its destination. I As shown, the facsimile units at the two stations may be identical, and each is adapted both for transmitting and receiving messages by electrical pickup and electrical rebrdingmethods respectively, EaQhLoI, the facsimile units comprises a transmitting andrecording metallic cylinder or drum, It; carried by. a ce t l d spo e riv n shaft I [which is journalled in frame members, I? d: ll; In; r nsmit and c in ign the, cylinder is rotated, in the directionindicated by the arrow, by any suitable means such as an electricmotor 15, preferably of the alternating current snychronous type which is connected in the illustrative, form shown by; adriving pulley L6 andlabclt- "12 20 riv n u l y I8 ii t hesshait l- T -prcvent slippage t e pulley have pins thereonwhich are received in slots in thebelt -asindicated; i

-The;cha racters or images 20 comprising the subjectmatten such as a telegram, to be transnitia v are m res ed b m n o a Subs here a ter i c o ed wh h re ra is, a clect GSUPUBJIICQ,IOD a SheetZI, for example, a pape telegraph blank, afterwhich the sheet is wra ped pn e m nd the a i y n r in hamaxmetshovn n, h re id lieleasably ecur d iQ hew imie ne yy ired ma r as by elastic retaining, bands such: as disclosed in Eatent No, 225;},868, issued September 16, 1941.

, A scanning electrode or metal stylus;22, w hose point bears on the surfaceof the paper sheet 2| 1 1 3 9 grams; is eieawr i e li s ed for mey e itl e 'iii ie r 19 rot a t H screw-threaded throughout the greaterpart oi its length the shaft ,being rotated, by driving 2' keyed to'tlie shafts H and, resp tivelv w never 'thegcylinder, is rotated.

the,stylusflflfisicaused. to traverse the cyl- "a longitudinal direction as the cylinder ,fthepitfc'hof the thread on the shaft 2,4

d eteririiningtheiextent of longitudinal traverse of the' stylus duringeach rotation of the cyl iriderandihence. the numberof scanning lines per inch! n this manner the stylus point will des se helicalpath as it moves over the surface of the telegraph blank and thus producea sqan iinsac n- 1 fAitei the-blank has been scanned it is taken oil-the cylinder andanother blank placed thereon either for sendinglanother telegram or for receiving a telegram, means being provided whereby the traveling carri'a'ge 23maybe manually returnedto-its starting-position. Thefore going method of obtaining-a scanning movement per se islwell known, as are various other methods of -electrically scanning a given field in facsimile-transmission systems, and it is to beunderstoodthat any of theknown methods of scanninglby meansof an electric stylus and suitable for the purpose. maybe employediin lieu of the foregoing method described. V

The metallic cylinder 1 0 is-electrically insulated fromlits associatedaiaparatus, the electrical con? nection to the cylinder being made by means of a, stationary brush or other. contact member 28 g which bears against the, cylinder and electrically connects the cylinder to the ground leg of the signal circuit. The metallic leg 30 of the signal circuit is connected to the scanning stylus 22 which nected to a transmitting amplifier 34 for raising the signal level to any desired value. The signals in. the output of the amplifier are transmitted over a circuit comprising conductor 35, switch 31,

' r sm sion in sw tqh a sta i n B; a

conductor 3iiatothereceiving amplifier til where the, i nal ereei i if fl and, p i b means. of tharswitch- 3i, conductor 38?, and electrical ,stylus;;22i, to; an electrosensitive; recording blank '43.; When synchronismof; the rotating, partsat stat ns andl pro e y ma n a n in n of the various Ways knownin the art, the message or image uppn' the blank 2i will be repro ducediin facsimileupon the receiving blank 40 as scanning proceeds. Any suitable type of elecr e s tir r c r in l nk ma be e rior example, a blanksuch-as disclosed in PatentNo 2,251,142, issuedAugust 5, 1941. i

Various of the known typesof vacuum tube signal-inverters may, be; employed at the station which is at the time transmittinga message, A simple form, of such an inverter 32 mayhave connectedthereto, through a potentiometer or tapped resistance unit, both positive'and negative grounded battery so thatwhen the stylus 22; is incontact with, the conductive background; of the transmitting blank zl, the positive potential is shunted from the grid circuitoi the inverter tube by; the conductive path through;thestylus-circuit, at; which time the: negative biasing potential on the gridof the invertertuberenders the tubenonconducting, butwhen the styluspointis-incontact wi ny of the: m ula ns r h g e anc chara ers 101 he me a e th s lu ui her so en it$ l it al q 5 lTfi i'ly 333 n ths:pos tiveotenti l i -a p ed;- iqihe i the inverter tube to render thetube conductin and itsplategcircuitcauses signalsto be impressed uponthe input circuit of the amplifier 34;: The

kindpf inverterj employedganddikewise the kind of amplifier, hOWBVEIy-dQBs not comprise my inventign.- andrare notshown in detail since such devices: and; their manner of operation are well known in the art; Thereceivingamplifier 38' which amplifies the receivedsignalsyto a suitable levelcausesmarkin p te iakof t e pr per valu toflbe applied intermittently by thefstyluslii to properly mark; the electrosensitive recording la kfi l r I a When-itfis desired-itotransmit from station B to stationwA, a,-:transmitti-ng blank such as the blanks2- Lrisplacedi on theldrum Ill? at station B, andracrecording blank 511011335, 40 isplaced on thedruma l0;of,station A; theswitch 3 I is thrown to:;its lower, or-receiving; positionand switch 31 toits upper, or transmitting-position. Transmission from stationB'andreception at station Aoinv'olves. the same operations asabove described withirespect to transmission from. the. opposite direction,.the.apparatus atthe two stations being identical;

Instead of employingdirect current circuits foratransmission over line L; it is to beunderstood that the signals generated at the-stationwhich is transmitting may be used to modulate a carrier current in known manner for transmission of the signals between the stations, in which case a twoconductor metallic circuit preferably will be employed between the stations.

Fig. 2 illustrates how a handwritten transmitting blank embodying the invention may be prepared. Sheet 2| has a conducting surface 2 la which may be obtainedin various ways. For example, the body of sheet 2|, which may be a sheet of ordinary paper, is made cOnductive either by impregnation with an electrolyte or by having a finely divided metal powder or finely divided carbon such as carbon black uniformly distributed throughout the pulp from which the paper sheet is rolled, so that when the point of the transmitting stylus is traversing unmarked areas of the sheet, signal current in the stylus circuit is readily conducted through the sheet to the underlying metal platen, such as the cylinder l shown in Fig. 1, on which the sheet is placed during a transmitting operation. Various examples of such electrolytes and conducting powders are disclosed in Patent No. 2,425,742, issued August 19, 1947. Preferably, finely divided carbon is employed to make the sheet conductive. The thickness of the paper 2| will depend upon the kind of stock used, for example, the thickness may vary from .0015 inch for tissue to .003 inch for thicker stock which comprises ordinary manila paper.

The conductivity of the sheet 2| must be sufiiciently high to cause the transmitting stylus current readily to pass through the unmarked areas of the sheet. For example, a suitable degree ofconductivity of a carbon impregnated sheet, is such that if a metal plate is positioned under the sheet and an electrode whose area of contact surface is .5 sq. cm. is pressed on the upper surface of the sheet with a pressure of approximately 500 grams, the electrical resistance of the paper is approximately from 42 to 58 ohms. The resistance of papers impregnated with electrolytes will be found to be higher and may be as high ast several times that of the carbon impregnated paper. It will be appreciated by those versed in the facsimile art that the necessary conductivity of the paper may vary within considerable limits and yet produce suitable signals,

depending upon various factors such as the voltage of the stylus current, the thickness of the paper 2|, the speed. at which the transmitter is to operate, and the frequency of the signal current in the stylus circuit when alternating current is employed.

Superimposed on the conductive blank 2| is a sheet of paper 4| having on the undersurface thereof a coating 4| a which preferably is an insulatingcomposition having the characteristics 'Of, and compounded in accordance with, any of the various examples hereinafter given, Pressure exerted by means of a pencil or other marking stylus 42 when writing the message on the upper surface of sheet 4|, causes transfer of the coating 4|a to the upper surface of blank 2| and impresses thereon either insulating or high resistance characters 20 corresponding to the characters written on the sheet, 4|. When the transmitting stylus 22 engages dielectric characters or other subject matter impressed on the surface of the sheet 2|, the stylus circuit is interrupted and current does not flow therein so long as the stylus is in contact with the insulating characters, whereby there are transmitted facsimile signals 67 representative of the subject matterbeing seenned by the transmitter.

Fig. 3 is a fragmentary view of a typewriter in which the sheets 2| and 4| are inserted, the sheets passing between the typewriter platen 43 and a paper guide 44 and a line guide 45. The insulating characters 20 are impressed on the surface of the conductive sheet 2| as the letters or characters of the telegram or other message are struck by type bars 46 which pass between a typewriter bar guide member 41 to strike a conventional typewriter ribbon 48 against the sheet 4| and impress thereon the characters carried by the type bars. The resultant dielectric characters are impressed upon the blank 2| to cause facsimile signals to be generated and transmitted in the manner described above in respect to Figs. 1 and 2.

Commercial carbon and similar transfer papers, even though available in a variety of compositions and colors, were found to be unsuitable for use in impressing th dielectric characters 20 onto the surface 2|a of the transmitting sheet. Such commercial transfer papers usually have a relatively hard coating with a thickness of approximately .0002 inch, and the coating is formulated to be used over and over again so that only partial transfer of the coating results at each writing or typing operation. The coating 4|a, however, is softer than the coatings on commercial transfer papers and is approximately .0006 of an inch thick, and transfer of the entire coating to the surface 2|a to impress a" character thereon is effected in any elemental area to which force is applied either by the pencil 42 or the type on the type bars 46, thereby to cause each of the impressedpharacters 20 to have approximately this thickness and insure not only good legibility of the characters on the transmitting blank 2| but also good legibility of the characters when reproduced on a fascimile recording blank.

The dielectric composition which preferably comprises the transfer coating 41a and the characters formed thereby possesses a number of special characteristics which make the same suitable for the purposes of the instant invention, as follows: They insure good legibility in the facsimile copy reproduced from the transmitting blank 2|; the characters 20 should be substantially continuous throughout the area thereof; the characters should have good dielectric prop erties; the characters should have a sufficient thickness coupled with toughness and a low coefficient of friction as between the transmitting stylus point and the characters so that during scannin there will be no appreciable deformation of the characters and the transmitting blank ma be scanned repeatedly if desired; and the transfer material should be sufliciently yielding and impressible as to fill the surface irregularities of the paper transmitting blank and cling to the fibers thereof.

The following formula represents a preferred example of a waxy transfer material for forming the coating Ma and having the characteristics above set forth:

Parts Paraffinwax 15 Carnauba wax 10 Beeswax 10 Mineral oil, SAE 10 15 Zinc sulphide 50 In the above formula the paraffin provides a base; the carnauba wax increases the melting point and hardness of the composition; the bees.

Ethyl acetates-as required 2,181,533, issued November 28, 1939.

ta e-8n Wait gives the necessary tackiness thereto; the mineral oil or petrolatum-provides a plastio'izr; and the zinc'sulphide-gives a desired color and body to the composition, iinpthis'case producing a white transfer material so that the impressed dielectric characters 20 stand out in sharp, contrast to the black surface 21w of the carbon impregnated transmitting blank 2!. It will be understood that the composition may be given any desired color by employing other coloring materials in addition to or in lieu of the zinc sulphide. V

Either ahomogeneous mixture of waxes or a non-homogeneous mixture having more than one phase may be employed. A hardening wax such as ouricury may be used instead of the carnauba wax, and a microcrystalline hydrocarbon wax may be used in addition to or inlieu of the beeswax of the foregoing formula; also greases and solid fats, such as stearic acid and stea rates, palm oil, sperm oil, tallow and the like mat be use to replace the paraffin and the mineral oil,

if desired. Resins orgums may be used to replace the hardeners, such as the carnauba and ouricur waxes, which resins or gums may compromise dammar gum, Congo gum, kauri gum,

employed is as follows:

Parts Beeswax 2 Diglycol stearate 1 Titanium dioxide or zinc sulphide 2 Non-waxy compositions may also be employed, such as illustrated by the following formula:

'P'a'rts Cellulose nitrate (high viscosity) "1'0 Dibutyl phthalate; 45-50 Zinc sulphide -'40 for regulating coating viscosity i I n V In lieu of employing the various'electrolytes or' conductive powders hereinbefore referred to, thetransmitting blank 2 l' ma be made conductive by impregnating it during the scanning operation of the transmitting stylus,-. withsalts which are conductive in non-aqueous solutions,,such'las certain salts of sodium, potassium and ammoniurmand in which the solubility ofsuch salts in a volatile, liquid such as. an alcohol, makes possible their use, as disclosed in Patent No. A solution of one of these salts in an alcohol maybe applied locally ahead of the stylus in theinann'er set forth in the aforesaid patent. This methodis especially suitable when a waxy composition is employed for forming the dielectric characters since such composition has the property of 'repelling liquids such as alcohol and thereby the paper is made conductive except in thoseelemen- .tal areas where the insulating characters have been impressed. Thisenables aplain'paper such as manila message blank stock to be used for the transmitting blank 21, without previous treatment, and the samemachine and procedureused for alcohol-moistening recording as disclosed "in as casein, starch and polyvinyl alcohol.

the blank conductive, except in those elemental areas where the insulating characters have been impressed. The alcohol evaporates after a short interval of time andthe sheet dries out rapidly and therefore the tensile strength of the sheet is not affected. The-alcohol does not raisethegrain of the paper as would be the case if an aqueous solvent were employed, although for certain purposes or certain types of papers an aqueous sole vent could-be used, thesolventbeing applied dii rectly, or by humidification as disclosed in Patent No. 2,225,247, issuedDecember 17, 194-0. H

An important advantage of the transmitting blank is that low voltage direct current may be utilized in the stylus pickup circuit. For instance,

the :voltage may be appreciably less than fifty volts, and excellent results have been obtained with potentials from twenty-five to thirtyvolts in the stylus circuit. With the instant method of transmission the upper limit of linear'soanning speed has not yet been ascertained, but with the inherently conductive blank good results have been obtained at linear scanning speeds as high as 75 inches per second, in contrast to-the conventional scanning speed of 24 inches per sec-- and currently employed in commercialtraffic. if desired, alternating current of suitable frequencies, for example, 2500 cycles and highenmayw be used in lieu of direct current in the stylus. circuit, and the currentin the stylus circuit is employed to modulate a carrier to produce the signals transmitted over the line. s

In the illustrated embodiment. of the invention the entire body ofthe blank 2! is made conductive, but if desired only the surface=2 la need be conductive. Thismay be obtained by coating the sheet 2| with a suitableconducting layer incorporated in a suitable binder, for example, synthetic resins commonly used in lacquers, such as cellulose nitrate, or water soluble materialssuch Where the body 21 of the blank is non-conducting, the

electrode 28"shown' in Fig. 1 isinxcontact with the marginal edge of the conductive surface of composition should beconductive to some extent,

if the electrical resistance of the impressed characters is substantially higher than that of the conductive sheet 2il'or layer 2 la, thestylus pickup circuit can distinguish between themarked and unmarked areas of the transmitting "blankand thus cause proper signals tobe generatedfor'con trolling a transmitting circuit.

' For brevity, the expression is-made conductive is' employed in a genericsense in the claims, wherever applicable, to define a' blank or sheet which is made conductive either initially or after the message characters to be transmitted are applied thereto.

Various other substances having properties similar to those of the substances specifically mentioned herein for forming the dielectric characters or other component parts of the subject matter of the transmitting blank, and. various other embodiments of the invention, will occur to those skilled in the art and, therefore, the particular substances and embodiments disclosed herein are to be considered in an illustrative sense rather than in a limiting sense.

What is claimed is:

1. In the art of facsimile transmission, the method of producing facsimile message signals which comprises forming the characters of the message by transferring to selected elemental areas of the surface of a transmitting blank that is made conductive a composition having an electrical resistance substantially higher than the resistance of said blank to provide characters of relatively high electrical resistance on a conductive background, scanning the transmitting blank with an electrical stylus, and causing facsimile signals to be transmitted in accordance with the difference in resistance between that of the characters scanned by said stylus and that of the unmarked conductive background.

2. A facsimile message transmitting blank come prising a base sheet having a surface adapted to be scanned by an electrical stylus of a facsimile transmitter, the surface of said sheet having impressed thereon message characters composed of an insulating composition which adheres to said surface and provides insulating characters thereon, whereby if the sheet is made conductive the current in the stylus circuit is interrupted when the stylus passes over the insulating characters.

3. A facsimile message transmitting blank comprising a base sheet having a conductive surface adapted to be operatively connected in circuit with the electrical scanning stylus of a facsimile transmitter, the conductive surface of said sheet having impressed thereon message characters composed of an insulating composition which adheres to said surface and provides insulating characters on a conductive background, whereby the current in the stylus circuit is interrupted when the stylus passes over the insulating characters.

4. A facsimile message transmitting blank comprising a base sheet having a surface adapted to be scanned by an electrical stylus of a facsimile transmitter, the surface of said. sheet having impressed thereon message characters composed of an insulating composition which adheres to said surface and provides insulating characters thereon, whereby if the sheet is made conductive the current in the stylus circuit is interrupted when the stylus passes over the insulating characters, said insulating composition having a contrasting color with respect to that of said background to enable the message thereon readily to be read.

5. A facsimile message transmitting blank comprising a base sheet having a surface adapted to be scanned by an electrical stylus of a facsimile transmitter, the surface of said sheet having impressed thereon message characters composed of an insulating composition which adheres to said surface and provides insulating characters thereon, whereby if the sheet is made conductive the 10 current in the stylus circuit is interrupted when the stylus passes over the insulating characters, the thickness of the impressed characters formed from the insulating composition being approximately .0006 inch.

6. A facsimile message transmitting blank comprising a base sheet having a surface adapted to be scanned by an electrical stylus of a facsimile transmitter, the surface of said sheet having typewritten thereon message characters composed of an insulating composition which adheres to said surface and provides typed insulating characters thereon, whereby if the sheet is made conductive the current inthe stylus circuit is interrupted when the stylus passes over the insulating typed characters.

'7. In the art of facsimile transmission, the method of producing facsimile message signals which comprises forming the characters of the message by transferring to selected elemental areas of the surface of a transmitting blank that is made conductive a waxy insulating composition having an electrical resistance substantially higher than the resistanc of said blank to provide characters of relatively high electrical resistance on a conductive background, scanning the transmitting blank with an electrical stylus, and causing facsimile signals to be transmitted in accordance with the difference in resistance between that of the insulating characters scanned by said stylus and that of the unmarked conductive background.

8. A facsimile message transmitting blank comprising a base sheet having a surface adapted to be scanned by an electrical stylus of a facsimile transmitter, the surface of said sheet having impressed thereon message characters composed of a plastic insulating composition which adheres to said surface and provides insulating characters thereon, whereby if the sheet is made conductive the current in the stylus circuit is interrupted when the stylus passes over the insulating characters.

9. A facsimile message transmitting blank comprising a base sheet having a surface adapted to be scanned by an electrical stylus of a facsimile transmitter, the surface of said sheet hav ing impressed thereon message characters composed of a waxy insulating composition which REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 2,153,858 Wise Apr. 11, 1939 2,301,024 DHumy Nov. 3, 1942 2,340,317 Finch Feb. 1, 1944 2,425,742 Kline Aug. 19, 1947

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2153858 *May 28, 1935Apr 11, 1939Western Union Telegraph CoTelegraphic transmission of intelligence
US2301024 *Nov 1, 1940Nov 3, 1942Western Union Telegraph CoMethod of and apparatus for preparing facsimile master copies
US2340317 *Jul 31, 1937Feb 1, 1944Finch Telecommunications IncFacsimile recorder
US2425742 *Jul 29, 1942Aug 19, 1947Western Union Telegraph CoElectrosensitive recording blank
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2751310 *Jan 20, 1951Jun 19, 1956Western Union Telegraph CoTransferable marking composition for facsimile transmitting blanks and transmitting blanks
US3515572 *Dec 16, 1968Jun 2, 1970Tipp Ex FabrikationTransfer sheet for obliterating typed character
US4230938 *Feb 21, 1978Oct 28, 1980Centurion Data CorporationComputer input/output device
Classifications
U.S. Classification358/478, 106/31.61, 346/135.1, 106/271, 427/146, 106/272, 106/169.43, 462/69, 106/169.37
International ClassificationB41M5/20, H04N1/23
Cooperative ClassificationH04N1/23, B41M5/20
European ClassificationB41M5/20, H04N1/23