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Publication numberUS2573698 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 6, 1951
Filing dateMar 25, 1948
Priority dateMar 25, 1948
Publication numberUS 2573698 A, US 2573698A, US-A-2573698, US2573698 A, US2573698A
InventorsEllery Emmett C
Original AssigneeEllery Emmett C
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Stirrup for orthopedic braces
US 2573698 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Nov. 6, 1951 E. c. VELLERY STIRRUP FOR ORTHOPEDIC BRACES Filed March 25, 1948 INVENTOR EMMEN c. ELLERY myl gl Z ATTORNEYS FlG. 2.

FIG. 4.

Patented Nov, 6, 195i UNITED erstes ear asians l' FFICE 11 Claims.

The present invention relates to orthopedic brace construction, and more particularly to a stirrup portion for an orthopedic brace having a leg portion and a portion adapted to be secured to a shoe.

In the making of orthopedic braces for leg and foot support, it is customary to secure a stirrup portion, as the part forming the bottom of the brace is known, to a wearers shoe. Since the muscular foot action of most wearers of this general type of brace is not normal, the shoe on the brace frequently tends Vto wear down excessively at some particular point, such as at the toe or one siderof the sole. Such uneven wear indicates need for correction, but adjustment is usually possible only by bending the metal members from which the brace is made, by cutting and rewelding these members, or by the use. of special shoes.

The angle of the foot with respect to the lower leg at the ankle joint also frequently affects ones ability touse the brace satisfactorily. For eX- y ample, in a brace having a fixed ankle joint, or one in which the ankle joint is movable, but having a spring-held normal position, a difference of even one degree in that position. may materially aiiectthe wearers ability to use the brace, and the Wear on his shoe.

It usually is not feasible for the wearer of this type of brace to remove the shoe from. the brace when itl is` desired to send the shoe out for repairs or to have it replaced. This means. that he must send they entire brace along, with the shoe attached, and wait until-the required work has been completed and the brace returned before he can Walk again.

Some braces have been made wherein the lower ends of the side frame members extend inwardly at right angles and clamp by spring ac.- tion into holes inthe sides of the heel of a shoe. Such braces, however, are subject to springing out of the holes when the wearer turns his ankle, and for this reason are not recommended by many doctors.

In some cases, it is desirablel for` one to start using abrace While an incapacitated leg is still heavily bandaged, or in a cast. In such cases, it has been necessary with previous brace: structures either to make a temporary brace for use during the wearing of the bandage or cast,. or to make the. permanent brace large enough: to receive. the bandage or cast, and then alter it to t the leg after the bandage or castV has been'V removed.

In either case, considerable.additional expense is .il

2 involved, and the diiculties encountered in securing a proper it must be duplicated.

In my copending application for patent, Serial No. 652,016, iiled March 5, 1946, now Patent No. 2,567,195, for Orthopedic Drop-Foot Brace, I have disclosed a brace stirrup having some advantages over previous structures, and the present application is a continuation in part of the subject matter thereof.

An object of the present invention is to make an improved stirrup for orthopedie braces.

Another object is to make a stirrup for orthopedic braces which has cooperative lockingengagernent with brace side portions.

Another object is to make a brace stirrup which is adjustable as to width oi a shoe or leg on which it is to be mounted.

Another object is to make a brace stirrup with angular foot adjustment facilities.

In order to attain these objects, there is provided, in accordance with one feature of the invention, a brace stirrup having side portions adapted to have interlocking supporting relation with straight brace side portions, the stirrup being adjustable laterally with respect to the brace side support portions, and having a shoe supporting platform' with angular sole positioning 4means associated therewith.

These and other features of the invention are set forth in the following description and the accompanying drawings, comprising one sheet. vIn the drawings:

Fig. 1 is a fragmentary view in side elevation of a brace stirrup incorporating the present invention as it would appear connected to a. brace and mounted on a wearers shoe;

Fig. 2 is a fragmentary sectional View through the stirrup taken in the plane of the line 2-2 of Fig. l, brace side portions being shown in dot-dash lines;

Fig. 3 is a plan view of the stirrup shown in Figs. l and 2; and f Fig. 4 is a sectional view taken in the planes of the broken line ll-4 of Fig. 3.

Referring to the specific embodiment of the invention illustrated in the drawings, a shoe l0 and the ankle I l of a wearer, are shown with one form of orthopedic brace l2 applied thereto. The brace as illustrated has an ankle joint i3 somewhat similar to that set forth in my pending application for patent referred to above. Brace side members it and l5 terminate in substantially straight lower end portions for connection to the ,stirrup in amanner to bebrought out later herein.

3 If used with a brace having but one side member, one only of the stirrup connections would be employed, and in such case would of course be made to project from a side or end, as required, to meet the brace member.

The stirrup illustrated has a relatively thin, rigid, metal plate Il' of general cross shape. This plate has a longitudinally extending body portion I8, and laterally extending arms i9 and 23 (see Fig. 3) which may be formed integrally therewith. l

The plate I'I is mounted on the shoe I3 with which it is to be used, with the laterally extending arms IB and 2i) substantially centered beneath the transverse axis of the wearers ankle joint. Metal guides 2I and 22 are provided beneath these laterally extending arms, and in these guides are inserted a pair of slidably adjustable brace side anchor members 2l and 23.

Each of the slidably adjustable anchor members has a straight portion, 23 and 24, respectively (see Fig. 3) with a longitudinally extending slot 23 therein through which the shank of an adjustment locking screw 33 is inserted. The adjustment locking screws 38 are screwed into threaded holes in the plate i7 to clamp the brace side anchor members 2 and 28 in adjusted position.

The outer end of each of the brace side anchor members 2l and 28 has an upwardly extending portion 3l thereon, in the upper end of which is a threaded opening to receive a screw 32 therein. The lower end of each of the brace side members I4 and I5 is of a shape and size to fit closely into a socket loop 33, formed integrally with, and projecting outwardly from, the lower end of the upwardly extending portion 3| of each of the adjustable brace support members 2l and 28. The shank of the screw 32 ts closely through a hole in each brace side member, and is screwed into the threaded hole in the upright port-ion 3| when the lower end of each brace side member is s inserted to a predetermined depth in its socket loop 33. The stirrup thus is firmly and rigidly connected to the brace side members, but can be removed readily when desired by unscrewing the two screws 32 and withdrawing the lower ends of the brace side members from their socket loops 33.

An angular adjustment plate 34, for distributing adjustment stresses over a substantial sole area, overlies the body portion i8 of the stirrup plate Il. This adjutment plate is mounted to overlie adjustment bushings or screws in the stirrup plate Il' for adjusting the sole of a shoe It worn with the brace at a required angle relatively to the plane of the plate body portion I8. The angular adjustment plate 34 preferably is of thin flexible spring metal, such as, for example, brass or steel shim stock. When the stirrup is mounted on a shoe, as shown in Fig. l, the angular adjustment plate 34 is interposed between the plate body portion I8 and the sole of the shoe beneath the instep or arch thereof. The rear end of the angular adjustment plate may be secured to the rear of the plate body portion I8 as by rivets 35 and 38.

A pair of externally threaded plate adjusting bushings 38, each having an axial opening 48 therethrough, are screwed into threaded openings in the forward end of the stirrup body portion I8. These bushings are each of a length to project above the plate body portion when screwed in their entire length to support the forward. end of the angular adjustment plate 34 in adjusted raised position relatively to the forward end of the plate body portion i8. Screws 4I for securing the stirrup to the shoe beneath the instep arch portion of the shoe sole 43 are of a diameter to pass through the axial opening in each of the bushings 38. As illustrated, these screws are adapted to screw into a threaded opening in anchoring nuts 43, mounted in holes in the sole 43 of a wearers shoe, to anchor the front end of the stirrup plate to the shoe. The rear end of the plate Il is gripped between the shoe sole 43 and a shoe heel 46 which is recessed closely to receive the portion of the stirrup between it and the sole.

By regulating the clearance between the front end of the angular adjusting plate 34 and the stirrup plate I'I, the angular position of the front portion of the sole which overlies it will also be regulated relatively to the plane of the stirrup plate. Thus, if the toe of the wearers shoe has a tendency to drag, or to catch on slight irregularities in the sidewalk, a slight raising of the toe of the shoe relatively to the brace frequently will correct the difficulty.

Such adjustment can be accomplished readily in the present stirrup by unsorewing the retaining screws 4I slightly to release the pressure on the bushings 38, and then screwing the bushings inwardly slightly to raise the forward end of the angular adjusting plate 34. The retaining screws 4I then may be retightened again to clamp the parts in adjusted position.

In case one side or the other of the sole of the shoe mounted on the stirrup shows excessive wear, the condition causing it can be corrected by screwing in the bushing 38 on the side of the shoe exhibiting excessive Wear to raise that side of the plate 34. This twists the thin flexible spring plate 34 slightly about the longitudinal axis of the shoe. The leather sole of the shoe, under the weight of the wearer, will conform to the contour of the plate 34, and the defect thus can be readily corrected.

This is a much simpler and more natural type of correction than the securing of wedges of leather or Wood to the sole of the shoe, or by the making of a special shoe with built-in wedge, as is sometimes done in an attempt to correct uneven wear on the sole of the shoe in a brace.

The present stirrup with its attached shoe may be removed easily from its brace by removing the screws 32 and moving the stirrup downwardly to release the lower ends of the side brace portions I4 and I5 from their socket loops 33.

Adjustment of the width of the lateral separation of the side brace member from the stirrup plate can be accomplished by loosening the screws 38 to permit slidable adjustment of the brace side anchor members 21 and 28 inwardly or outwardly as desired. For example, if the brace initially is to be tted over a cast, the members 2'I and 28 may initially be secured in widely separated position. Then when the cast is removed the screws 36 may be loosened, the members 21 and 28 slidably moved inwardly to a newly adjusted position, and then secured in such newly adjusted position by again tightening the screws 30.

The stirrup illustrated can be used with any orthopedic brace of this general type simply by making the lower ends of its brace side anchor member or members of a size and shape to iit into a corresponding anchoring device on the stirrup, and securing it in position thereon. The stirrup also, of course, is adapted for use with braces having but one side or back vertical member. The adaptation for such use would be at once apparent to any skilled brace maker having the present disclosure of the invention before him.

The stirrup permits the use of any desired number of shoes interchangeablyl with a brace by providing an additional stirrup for each shoe. The present invention assures that eachfshoe, when replaced on the brace, willi be inthe same relative position thereto as when. it was. removed therefrom. It also permitsl individual` adjustment foreach shoe, as is frequently required by wearers ofj this general type of? brace, either.' due to.v a change in the physical` condition` of'` the wearer o'r by wear on the shoe itself.

While I have illustrated and described a preferred form of the invention, it will be understood by those familiar with the art that the device is capable of some changes without departing from the spirit of the invention. It is desired, therefore, not to limit the invention except as set forth in the following claims.

I claim:

1. In an orthopedic brace having a pair of brace side members, a stirrup member comprising a planiform member adapted to be secured beneath the instep portion of a shoe sole, a pair of laterally adjustable brace side receiving members mounted on said planiform member, locking means mounted to lock said adjustable members independently in adjusted position, each of said adjustable members having an opening adapted closely to receive a lower end of a brace side member therein, fastening means mounted at a predetermined position of insertion of each side member in said opening nrmly to secure the stirrup to the side members, and means mounted on said planiform member acting between predetermined areas of the planiform member and the shoe sole, adjustably to vary angular separation therebetween.

2. In an orthopedic brace having a pair of brace side members, a stirrup member comprising a planiform portion adapted to be secured across the instep portion of a shoe sole, a pair of laterally adjustable brace side receiving members mounted on said planiform portion, locking means mounted to lock said adjustable members in adjusted position, each of said adjustable members having a socket adapted closely to receive a lower end of a brace side member therein, fastening means mounted at a predetermined position of insertion of each side member in said socket firmly to secure the stirrup to the side members, a thin, strong exible plate interposed between the shoe sole and the planiform stirrup member, and means acting between forward areas of the planiform stirrup member and the thin interposed plate adjustably to vary angular separation between these members and thereby the angular separation between the planiform stirrup member and the shoe sole.

3. A stirrup for an orthopedic brace having an upright member, said stirrup comprising a rigid planiform element adapted to mount on a shoe sole beneath the instep portion of said shoe sole, means securing said planiform element to said brace member, means at one end of said planiform element for securing the same to the sole of a shoe, a thin spring plate interposed between the planiform element and 'the shoe sole, and adjustable spa-cmg means mounted on said planiform element and extending between the planiform element and said plate.

4. A stirrup for an orthopedic brace, said stirrup comprising a thin, rigid plate of substantial width adapted to be mounted to extend lengthwise beneath the instep portion of a shoe with the rear end of said plate closely beneath the sole of a shoe, means on said plate for supporting the front end of said plate in adjustably 6,2 spacedrelatiomtu saidsoleg, means carriedby.` said plate and, the: sole;l or. the. shoe. for; securing f the front; end of'. said plate tesaicl sole. in such adjustably spaced;relation-l thereto, and means for securing said plateto. an upright brace-,memberi 5;. A; stirrupfor 2in-.orthopedic brace; said. stirrup comprising/ a thin, rigid; plate adapted to,A be mountedto extend lengthwise -beneath;v the; instep portionof a1shoewith therear-'end of; Said plate closely beneath the sole of a shoe, meansi carried by. said., plate; andthe sole of the shoe for supporting the front endof saidplate in adjustably spaced relation to said sole, and means for securing said plate toA anupright brace member.

6. In an orthopedic brace structure, astirrup comprising a cruciform, thin but stiff member, the body portion thereof being of substantial width, relatively to the sole instep portion and being mounted lengthwise beneath the instep portion of a shoe sole, the arms of said cruciform member extending laterally to lie substantially beneath the transverse axis of the ankle joint of a wearer, a laterally adjustable brace side element secured to each arm of said cruciform member, an adjusting bushing threaded into each side of the forward end of said body portion and adapted to extend upwardly therefrom adjustably to support a shoe sole element thereon, and fastening means passing through each of said bushings and into the shoe sole to secure the forward end of said body portion in adjustably spaced relation to each side of the shoe sole, and to clamp the bushings against turning movement.

'7. In an orthopedic brace structure, a stirrup comprising a cruciform, thin but stiff member, a body portion thereof being mounted lengthwise beneath the instep arch portion of a shoe sole, the arms thereof extending laterally to lie substantially beneath the transverse axis of the ankle joint of a wearer, a laterally adjustable brace side element secured to said cruciform member, an adjusting member threaded through the forward end of said body portion and adapted to extend upwardly therefrom to support a shoe sole element thereon in adjustably spaced relation to the shoe sole, and fastening means passing through said adjustable bushing and into the shoe sole to secure the forward end of said body portion in adjustably spaced relation to the shoe sole, and to clamp the bushing against turning movement.

8. In an orthopedic brace structure, a stirrup comprising a thin but stiff planiform member mounted to underlie a substantial area beneath the instep arch portion of a shoe sole, a laterally adjustable upright brace anchor element secured to project from said planiform member, means for securing an upright brace member removably to said anchor element, an adjusting member mounted on each side of the forward end of said planiform member and adapted to project upwardly therefrom to support a shoe sole element thereon, and fastening means passing through said planiform member and connected to the shoe sole to secure the forward end of said body portion in adjustably spaced relation to each side of the shoe sole, and to clamp the adjusting members against movement.

9. An orthopedic brace as dened in claim 8 in which a thin spring plate is interposed between the adjusting members and the shoe sole.

l0. In an orthopedic brace structure, a stirrup comprising a thin, stiff plate adapted to be mounted to underlie a substantial area beneath the instep arch portion of a shoe, means on said plate for securing an upright brace member thereto, an adjusting member mounted on each side of the forward end of said plate and projecting from the upper side thereof, and fastening members extending through the respective adjusting members for connection to the shoe sole.

11. An orthopedic brace as defined in claim 10 in which a thin spring plate is interposed between the adjusting members and the shoe sole, said plate being apertured to receive the fastening members.

EMMETT C. ELLERY.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the le of this patent:

Number 8 UNITED STATES PATENTS Name Date Wood Aug. 30, 1870 Stillman Sept. 13, 1881 Burns Aug. 7, 1883 Brooks Aug. 9, 1927 Kolarik Dec. 31, 1946 Richards April 6, 1948 Burrows Dec. 14, 1948

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US106907 *Aug 30, 1870 Improvement in apparatus for treating club feet
US246984 *Apr 16, 1880Sep 13, 1881 Surgical brace
US282491 *Aug 7, 1883 Club-foot apparatus
US1638285 *Oct 27, 1923Aug 9, 1927Augustus Brooks AubreyLeg and ankle support
US2413634 *May 18, 1944Dec 31, 1946John KolarikCaliper brace
US2439100 *Dec 23, 1946Apr 6, 1948Richards Arthur ROrthopedic device
US2456046 *Mar 24, 1947Dec 14, 1948Burrows Glen ALeg brace
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3589359 *Jul 24, 1968Jun 29, 1971Us ArmyUnidirectional fiberglass composite drop-foot brace
US4408600 *Feb 1, 1982Oct 11, 1983Davis Edward PLeg aid device and method
US4628945 *Jan 25, 1985Dec 16, 1986Johnson Jr Glenn WInflatable ankle brace with porous compressible filler
US6102881 *Apr 23, 1999Aug 15, 2000Todd R. QuackenbushHinged drop foot brace
Classifications
U.S. Classification602/16, 602/10
International ClassificationA61F5/01
Cooperative ClassificationA61F5/0127
European ClassificationA61F5/01D5