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Publication numberUS2574599 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 13, 1951
Filing dateApr 28, 1947
Priority dateApr 28, 1947
Publication numberUS 2574599 A, US 2574599A, US-A-2574599, US2574599 A, US2574599A
InventorsStieber Frank C
Original AssigneeStieber Frank C
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Sighting device for bows and arrows
US 2574599 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

NOV. 13, STIEBER SIGHTING DEVICE FOR BOWS AND ARROWS Filed April 28, 1947 2 SHEETSSHEET l Patented Nov. 13, 1951 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE SIGHTIN G DEVICE FOR BOWS AND ARROWS 4 Claims.

My invention relates to a novel sighting device and range finder for use on archery bows and the-like.

An important object of my invention is the provision of a plurality of gauge-acting sighting apertures. associated with the intermediate portion of the bow and which are generally longitudinally spaced with respect to the bow and of progressively smaller size from the upper to the lowermost thereof. These gauge-acting sighting apertures, when associated with indicia, indicating progressively greater distances, may be effectively used as sighting and range finding apertures when used in. locating a target of a given size.

Another highly important object of my invention is to provide a sight which will automatically allow for veerage or lateral deflection of the arrow in its flight.

Another object of my invention is to provide a sighting device which is adjustable in any direction to compensate for various bow characteristics and also to compensate for weakening of a bow-after. long periods of use.

A still further object of my invention is the provision of an adjustable sightingbead on the bow string which, when utilized in cooperation with my novel sighting means, will greatly increase the efficiency and accuracy of. the archer.

A still. further object ofmy invention is the provision of a novel sighting plate incorporating my novel arrangement together with novel means for adjustably anchoring the same to a bow.

A still further object of my invention is the provision of a sighting means and range finder for archery bows and the like which. is inexpensive to manufacture, rugged in construction, and durable inuse.

The above and still further objects and advantages of my invention will become apparent from the following detailed specification, appended claims, and attached drawings.

Referring to the drawings, wherein like characters indicate like parts throughout the several views:

Fig. 1 is a diagrammatical, View of the relative directions of the line of sight and the flight of the arrow when utilizing my novel sighting arrangement;

Fig. 2 is a fragmentary perspectivev diagramma-tical view showing a. bow and arrow having secured thereto the preferred embodiment of my invention;

Fig. 3' is a rear elevation of. the; intermediate portion of the structure of Fig. 2 on an enlarged scale, some parts being broken away;

Fig. 4 is a fragmentary side elevation of the parts shown in Fig. 3 on a still further enlarged scale;

Fig. 5 is an enlarged transverse section taken on the line 55 of Fig. 2;

Fig. 5 is a view in perspective of the anchoringbracket of my sighting device;

Fig. 7 is a front elevation of a sighting plate incorporating a modified embodiment of my invention; and

Fig. 8 is an enlarged View in section, taken on the line 88 of Fig. 7.

Referring with great particularity to the drawings, the numeral i indicates, in its entirety, a conventional archery bow having an intermediate portion or bow handle 2, and a bow string- 3 secured to opposite ends thereof. An anchoring bracket 4, having spaced longitudinally-extended slots 5, is provided at its opposite ends with cfiset mounting feet 5 which are adapted to rest upon the forward surface l of the bow 5 immediately above the bow handle 2. The anchoring bracket l may be fastened to the bow by any suitable means but, as shown, is fastened thereto by means of bands 8 of any suitable material such as adhesive tape. The anchoring bracket 4 is provided with a plurality of longitudinally-extending laterally-spaced parallel marking grooves 9 adjacent one edge thereof and is provided with a plurality of longitudinally-spaced laterally-extending parallel marking grooves If] adjacent the lower end portion thereof.

A sighting plate H is provided with a pair of open-ended slots 52 which extend i wardly from one side edge thereof. pair of headed mounting screws 13 extend outwardly through the slots 5 in the anchoring bracket and the slots E2 in the sighting plate ii, for adjustably locking the sighting plate H to the anchoring bracket 4, and are provided with washer-equipped knurled thumb nuts 14. A slot-engaging shank portion IE on the screws 23, immediately under the heads thereof, are seated in the slots 5 of the anchoring bracket 6 to prevent the mounting screws from turning when the thumb nuts it are tightened thereon.

It will be observed that the laterally-projecting side edge It of the sighting plate H is provided with a plurality of open-ended vertically-spaced gauge-acting sighting slots H, the distance between the side edges of which decreases progres-v sively from the uppermost thereof to the lowermost. At its intermediate portion, the plate It is provided with vertically-spaced distance-indicating indicia i8, each indicium being adjacent to and associated with a sighting slot or aperture, the width of which coincides with the apparent diameter of a circle of given diameter when viewed by the archer therethrough at the distance indicated by said associating indicium. To illustrate, the normal buils-eye of an archery target is 8 inches in diameter. This bulls-eye has an apparent diameter at any given distance, which, of course, is a great deal less than the actual diameter. At 90 feet for instance, the bulls-eye has an apparent diameter to the eye of the archer, measurable in fractions of an inch. The sides of one of the gauge-acting slots I! (see Fig. 3) are spaced apart to coincide with this apparent diameter of the 8 inch bulls-eye when viewed by an archer therethrough (while the same is held at normal average arms length from the eye) from a distance of 90- feet. The same is done for a number of other spaced distances within a given range. Thus, it will be seen, by reference to Figs. 2 and 3, that in the uppermost gauge-acting slot Ii, the sides thereof are spaced the farthest apart, because the apparent diameter of the 8 inch target will be greatest at the shortest distance, there measured, to wit, 60 feet. Likewise the distance between the sides of the lower most slots I? is the least, because the apparent diameter of the 8 inch bulls-eye is the smallest from the 160 feet indicated. From the foregoing, it will be seen that, with a bulls-eye of known diameter, it is possible by sighting through different of the sighting slots IT, to determine the distance of the target from the archer. Obviously the substantially vertical arrangement of the sighting apertures, with the widest thereof at the top, provides the proper elevation of the bow for any one of the indicated distances, as the proper sighting aperture is interposed between the eye of the archer and the target.

It will also be observed that the edge I6 is so associated with the anchoring structure that it conforms to a plane downwardly diverging from the adjacent longitudinal edge I9 of the bowl I when the plate I I is secured thereto. This divergence of the edge I6 with respect to the longitudinal edge I3 of the bow is designed to compensate for veerage or lateral deflection of the arrow at in its fight caused by the normal offcenter relationship of the arrow to the bow during projection therefrom by the bow string 3 (see Fig. 3).

As a further aid to the archer in the utilization of my novel sighting plate, I provide an adjustable sighting bead 29 on string 3 which is interposed between the eye of the archer and any given one of the gauge-acting sighting apertures I 7 and aligned therethrough with the target.

For adjustment of the sighting plate II with respect to the bow I, to compensate for peculiarities of a given bow or weakening of a given bow during use, the thumb nuts I l-i are loosened and the plate I I is moved either longitudinally of the bow I or laterally thereof, the marking grooves 9 and It being used as guides for the edges 2| and 22 respectively of the plate II.

In order toprovide sharp definition of the gauge-acting sighting apertures I'I, it will be noted that I preferably taper the edges thereof as indicated at 23 from the back side of the plate II to provide relatively sharp edges to the side edges of the slots H.

'In the modified form of sighting plate shown in Figs. 7 and 3, a sighting plate 24 is shown having laterally-extended mounting slots 25 and a tapered sighting slot 26, the sides of which converge from the upper end portion to the lower end portion thereof. The sighting slot 26 is adjacent the laterally outwardly projecting edge 21 of plate 24, and spaced range or distance-indicating indicia 28 are vertically arranged on the intermediate portion of the plate 24. Marking lines 29 are associated with the indicia 28 and extend laterally across the sighting slot 26. The side edge portions 30 and 3I of the sighting slot 26, adjacent each marking line 29, form sighting apertures and are spaced apart to coincide with the apparent diameter of a given circle when viewed by the archer at the distance indicated by the indicium. In other words, the primary difference between the sighting plates II and 24 is that, in the former, the side edges of the sighting apertures are vertically spaced, whereas in the latter they are substantially horizontallyspaced.

It will be observed that a line drawn through the longitudinal center of the slot 25 conforms to a plane downwardly diverging from the adjacent longitudinal edge I9 of a bow when the plate 24 is operatively attached to the bow in the same manner as the side edge I6 of sighting plate II. Here again, this divergence compensates for veerage or lateral deflection of the arrow in its flight. As shown in Fig. 8, the side edges 30 and SI of the slot 26 are beveled or tapered, as at 32.

It should be obvious that my sighting plates I I and 2 could be made of any suitable material, even glass or other transparent sheet material, which will render visible a maximum of the area surrounding the target.

My invention has been thoroughly tested and found to be completely satisfactory for the accomplishment of the above objects.

What I claim is:

1. In a sighting device for archery bows, a I

sighting plate, means for anchoring said plate to the longitudinal intermediate portion of the bow in a vertical plane with a portion thereof projecting laterally outwardly of one side of the bow, vertically-spaced indicia on said plate indicating from the uppermost to the lowermost thereof progressively greater distances forwardly thereof, the laterally-projecting side edge of said plate being provided with a plurality of open-ended vertically-spaced gauge-acting sighting slots the dis tance between the side edges of which decrease progressively from the uppermost thereof to the lowermost, each of said slots being adjacent to and associated with one of said indicia, the inner ends of said slots from the uppermost thereof to the lowermost thereof being spaced progressively a greater distance from the adjacent side of the bow whereby to compensate for lateral veerage of an arrow by the bow.

2. The structure defined in claim 1 in which the laterally-projected side edge of said plate is substantially parallel to a line drawn through the inner ends of said slots whereby to produce sighting slots of substantially uniform depth.

3. The structure defined in claim 1 in which said indicia is located on the laterally-projected portion of said plate intermediate said slots and the adjacent side edge of the bow.

4. The structure defined in claim 1 in further combination with a sighting bead on the bow string above the longitudinal center thereof, said bead being adapted to be visually aligned with the target through a selected one of said slots in Number said sighting plate. 1,818,381 FRANK C. STIEBER. 1,989,697

REFERENCES CITED 5 The following references are of record in the Number file of this patent: 171 1,505 UNITED STATES PATENTS 18,308 Number Name Date 10 72,284 766,658 Beal Aug. 2, 1904 102,697

Name Date Caruth Aug. 11, 1931 Knisley Feb. 5, 1935 FOREIGN PATENTS Country Date Great Britain 1852 Great Britain 1915 Great Britain 1914 Switzerland May 1, 1916 Australia Dec. 3, 1937

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US766658 *Dec 5, 1901Aug 2, 1904Latham Osborn BealRange-finding and sighting appliance for weapons.
US1818381 *Feb 10, 1927Aug 11, 1931Caruth William AGun sight
US1989697 *Sep 11, 1933Feb 5, 1935Knisley Andrew WLong range aerial gun sight
AU102697B * Title not available
CH72284A * Title not available
GB185200171A * Title not available
GB191418308A * Title not available
GB191501505A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2667692 *Nov 23, 1951Feb 2, 1954Leafstrand Douglas JBow sight
US2742702 *Apr 27, 1954Apr 24, 1956Williams Roger FBow sight
US2767472 *May 2, 1955Oct 23, 1956Kocur Joseph SCoordinated bow sight and range finder
US2771678 *Feb 15, 1952Nov 27, 1956Hansen Sr Fred CGolfing aids
US2909167 *Oct 19, 1956Oct 20, 1959Bert E FredricksonRepeating shot archery bow with double sight
US3084442 *Aug 9, 1960Apr 9, 1963Donald JacobsonBow sight
US3136063 *Aug 13, 1962Jun 9, 1964Stebbins Herve ASighting device for archer's bow
US3365800 *Aug 7, 1967Jan 30, 1968Richard F. CarellaArchery bow sight assembly
US3389695 *Mar 7, 1966Jun 25, 1968August F. RoloffSighting element for bow for archery
US3418718 *Oct 30, 1967Dec 31, 1968George C. CurrentBow and arrow sight
US3455027 *Aug 30, 1967Jul 15, 1969Perkins David JArchery bow sight
US3875674 *May 8, 1972Apr 8, 1975Davidson Wilbur JAutomatic range finding bow sight
US3977086 *May 5, 1975Aug 31, 1976Williams Jr Albert JRange estimating device for golfers
US4109390 *Oct 14, 1976Aug 29, 1978Smith Kenneth JBow sight
US4116194 *Oct 18, 1976Sep 26, 1978Fine-Line, Inc.Peep sight for archery bow
US4198949 *May 19, 1978Apr 22, 1980Cook Julian LSlingshot with adjustable sight
US4263718 *Feb 1, 1979Apr 28, 1981Smith Jimmie TArchery attachment bracket
US4309827 *Oct 12, 1979Jan 12, 1982Larson Marlow WAdjustable sighting device for archery bows
US4514907 *Jul 18, 1984May 7, 1985Saltzman Leonard FBow and arrow sighting device
US4570352 *Aug 22, 1985Feb 18, 1986Leal Manuel JBow sight
US4813150 *Jul 16, 1987Mar 21, 1989Richard ColvinArchery sight
US4819611 *May 23, 1988Apr 11, 1989Sappington Donald RArchery bow flexible sight pin
US4910874 *Jun 8, 1989Mar 27, 1990Busch Jeffery AArchery bow sight with ganged lateral pin movement
US4984373 *Jul 25, 1989Jan 15, 1991Forrest Richard MArchery bow sight
US6560884 *Nov 20, 2001May 13, 2003Abbas Ben AfshariFixed pin bow sight
US6634111 *Jun 28, 2001Oct 21, 2003Tru-Glo, Inc.Multiple pin sight for an archery bow
US6732727 *Aug 25, 2000May 11, 2004Bear Archery, LlcArchery bow with bow speed specific sight pin block
US6938349May 12, 2003Sep 6, 2005Abbas Ben AfshariBow sight with vertically aligned pins
US7100291 *May 12, 2003Sep 5, 2006Abbas Ben AfshariFixed pin bow sight
US7877885Jan 27, 2010Feb 1, 2011Davis Lewis ERange finder for an archery bow
US7886448 *Sep 8, 2009Feb 15, 2011Humpert Edward JArchery range finders and lenses
US8365423 *Jan 7, 2009Feb 5, 2013Humpert Edward JRemovable archery range finder and range finder insert
Classifications
U.S. Classification124/23.1, 124/87, 33/265
International ClassificationF41G1/00, F41G1/467
Cooperative ClassificationF41G1/467
European ClassificationF41G1/467