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Publication numberUS2574848 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 13, 1951
Filing dateMay 18, 1946
Priority dateMay 18, 1946
Publication numberUS 2574848 A, US 2574848A, US-A-2574848, US2574848 A, US2574848A
InventorsSchroeder Arthur M
Original AssigneeSchroeder Arthur M
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Feather drying system
US 2574848 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

N0V 13, 1951 A. M. SCHROEDER' FEATHER DRYING SYSTEM 2 SHEETS-SHEET l Filed May 18, 1946 IN V EN TOR.

@w/uff M 56% woede?" Nov. 13, 1951 A. M. SCHROEDER FEATHER DRYING SYSTEM 2 SHEETS---SHEET 2 Filed May 18, 1946 INVENTOR.

Patented Nov. 13, 1951 UNITED "STATES PAT-ENT .OFFICE FEATHERDRYINGSYSTEM .Y Arthur Schroeder, ..Chcago,.1ll.

lApplicationMay18, 1946, 'Serial-No. 4'670,6'61

i :Claims This invention relates todriers andimorerspecically tofeather-driers arrangedffor'continuous performance at high eiciency operation under substantially automatic performance l in :a system that can be Vreadily oon'trlledfor uniform fout- ;put of driedfeathers.

One cf themain objects of'ftliislinventionisfto provide an f arrangement 'o'f-` connected :units-each lcontributingksuc'cessivelyto the cycle (if-'handling 'feathersifrom' a'wet state yto a-'perfectly dryi state, ,and which arrangement of units Lsimultaneously permits continuous operation vas long Aas Wet feathers are introduced for drying.

Feather drying Aequipment in the past "has generally utilized driers'havingforcedairblowers at the Ientry end-thereof to A ej ect thewet :feather and:airmixiintoitheinlet end' offthe'driers. This has 'not been `satisfactory because Wet feathers or bunche'd groups `thereof 'would be Ieffected -at times from the drier through the .direct-action V6j. fthe blower"fanblades. Also, 'attimes during thepassage of feathers to the blower 'and into the .drying chamber, wet Jfeathers "would be brought inballs Qrgroupsbythe air stream from Athejeed inlet, .and upn.contacting"the*Ian"blades of .the blower, suchgroupsrorballs would be forced against .the sides .of the .drier by tangential or radialejectionfromthe"blowerffanblades This is. noisyiand valso .causes `deformations of the drier Walls .from Ithe Vim-pact.

Inaddition, `When the .bloweris housed `Within or forms a part -of the inlet end .of vthe L'dfier, feathers will `stick or A pack lto @the .Lian blades `vof the blower under certainconditions ofxoperation. Thisicreates an unbalanced relation'inducingan oi center load uwhich :sets .up vibration in ythe blower and .the entire `.drier 4-iinit Yas Vthe fan ro- .tates producing undesirable results that .are Ybvious.

V,The `:system .and units of Athe vpresent design have .been .so Iconstructed and .arranged .as vto overcome the above obections and "limitations thereby providing advantages 'that are selfevident. :The system iis mainly -operated under suction with certain pressure zones for definite purposes. The drying chamber'is acted uponby suction 'from above /to draw the .air and .feather mix outof. such chamber. 'Thebag filler-"isalso subjected to suctionas an efficient attribute to completely 'filling .a "bag in :a relatively "short 'interval.

'.One pressure Lzone is established ahead 'of the heater :and feeder, :but 'such air streamwilllose some of its kinetic venergy 'at the time reaches the 'drier although itwill still blow `Wet feathers into the drier to pile `up in 'the bottom thereof, While advancing -dried *feathers `up the :chamber tof-be drawn koiitiby *the yVacuum 'at'the'top thereof as createdby 'itheisuctionisideiof -a blower. :Another pressure .fzone @created `dieyond the elast inamed blower vto convey `v`the `dried f'feathers .to

vza bag llerror "other storage fplace as the case t-may be. Pressurei'inzthe latter zone is dispersed Eby "novelimeans .substantially .automatic i in oper- 'ationlasfthebags areibeing filled.

.it iis xanother 'object l:of Ithis invention, Vtherezfore, to 'provide such lautomatic pressure relief :means to allow loss 'of free Lair ffrom fthe inlet side :ofthe filler and from Withina bag being filled 'lto accommodate `air dispersion which is normally reduced as 'a bag :'lls with lmore and rmore lfeathers 4until full.

Another object jof vthe .present invention is jto `provide 4a multiple bag filling chamber wherein the feathers are forced under rpressure into the receiving bagsand'atthe'same time aloWer pressure or partial `vacuum 'as explained above is maintained-aboutthebag being filled to greatly minimize Vthe fiilling -time land to introduce 'a greater concentration and weight Jof feathers into the bags in comparison with past practice and experience. By reason ofthe multiple Vbag filling chamber, the bags may be changed providing continuous lling and replacement of bags.

There are other bjectsand advantagespresent in the'feather drier 'design representing a preferred construction thereof which will hereinafter yappear in the follo'vving detailed description thereof 4:having reference to v the 'accompanying drawings forming 4a part of 'this specification.

In the :drawings:

-Figf1 is affront elevationaliview of apreferred arrangement'of connected units diagrammatically illustrated 4and adapted to carry out the-function of ;drying'feathers; and i Fig. "2 is a planview of 'the general arrangement shown "in Fig. 1 .and diagrammatically i1- lustrating `further details of construction 'of the same'system which .contribute to thesuccess of the drier.

The `preferred .design of feather drier asportrayed .in .the drawings begins with a heater ,i adapted for v,heating vair supplied thereto through asuitable inlet duct .2, such airybeing heated to a selected temperature best suited rfor the amount Vof .feathers .being dried. From experience it `has ,been found .that 300 F. isa good temperatureat .which to discharge .air .through the outlet Lduct -B-of the theater l and yinto .the feeder 4 through which the .Wet 4featbersare introduced-intothesystemforsdrying.

The heater I may be heated in any manner feasible -for .supplyingheat to .the lcirculating air of the system. In-Fig. 2a steamcoil^5;isiused to jprovide `the ,necessary heat FGas, oil, @electricity or: anyother Aenergyproducing means .may be fused 1kto .supply heat to the isystem, :and con- Ventiona'l thermal responsive lmeans may beused to.hold .theexhaustrarin duelli-,3 at 300 :F.orat azpredetermined'rtemperature that may be ,desired and controlled through manual setting of the conventional thermal responsive means.

From the heater I, the air enters duct '6 which is arranged vfor vertical discharge along an offset path by means of a bottom inlet duct 1 leading into one side of the bottom of a vertically disposed feather drying chamber 8 that is narrowi but relatively long to give the feathers a turbulent and tumbling action. The feathers enterchamber 8 with the heated air coming from the heater I when the feathers are fed into the system through the feeder 4. In chamber 8 the wet and partially wet feathers tend to drop or descend at various rates toward the bottom end portion 6a of the chamber 8 as in Fig. 2 and to- Ward the inlet duct 1, while the. drier feathers tend to rise upwardly toward the outlet duct 9 leading from the expansion chamber I forming the upper end of the chamber 8. Thus, wet and dry feathers or partially wet and partially dry feathers pass each other or collide at different altitudes within the drying `chamber 8, but in all cases the strictly dry feathers will rise and pass through the expansion chamber I0 and out through the outlet duct 9 into the suction side of the hot air blower I I. The general turbulence and intermingling of the feathers can be viewed through either of the glass windows I2 and I3 on the side of the drying chamber 8 by shining a light through the other glass window. The violence of the action observed will permit adjustments to be made for reducing or increasing such action by changing motor speeds or the drives to the blowers or by regulating ,the dampers of the system and more particularly the damper 51 in duct 54.

The action of the expansion chamber I0 is to provide a chamber having a larger transverse cross-sectional area than the transverse crosssectional area of the main chamber 8 to momentarily decrease the flow of air carrying mostly dry feathers to the outlet duct 9 thereby giving feathers that may still be wet or slightly damp which reach this part of the drying chamber an opportunity to descend again a suicient amount to become completely dried and to be subsequently carried upwardly and out of duct 9 to blower II.

From blower II the air and dried feather mix is discharged into duct I4 to be conveyed to the bag ller I5. The air is now at about a temperature of 200 F. which is approximately the temperature at which the feathers are forced, under pressure of the blower II, into the feather'receiving bags disposed in the ller I5.

To provide a filler capable of continuous reception of feathers and having bags disposed to always accommodate the feathers coming through duct I4, the filler I5 has at least two compartments I6 and Il, each having appropriate releasable bag holding means I8 and I 9, respectively', to receive bags such as 20 shown in operative feather receiving position with the holding means I8 and in compartment I6. Each compartment I6 and I1 has corresponding doors 2| and 22 for loading purposes hinged to the filler I5, with suitable handles 23 and 24 placed in positions for the convenience of the operator of the filler I5.

The compartments I 6 and I7, and their respective bag holding means I8 and I9 are served by a manifold 25 into which the duct I4 discharges the air feather mix. A damper 26 is located centrally of the manifold 25 and functions to divert the air feather mix to either of the filler compartments depending upon its position. As shown in broken lines in Fig. 1, the damper 26 is diverting the air feather mix into the compartment I6 and into bag 20 there shown. By moving damper 26 into the dot and dash line position in Fig. 1the air feather mix would be diverted to a bag supported in compartment Il.

Damper 26 may be suitably operated by a chain, wire or `cord 2l passing over and secured to a pulley 28 carried by the damper shaft 29 as best seen in Fig. 1. Convenient hand grip balls 30 and SI painted a striking color or colors may be secured to the loose ends of the cord 21, and the latter may be of such a length as to cause one of the balls to always occupy a position adjacent one of the door handles as a visual means to indicate to the operator which compartment of the filler i5 is in operation. As seen in Fig. l, ball 38- is down next to the door handle 23 to indicate that compartment I6 has a bag in receiving position and damper 26 is automatically tilted to serve the bag 20 in compartment I6.

As bag 20 is being filled in compartment I6 with feathers under pressure from blower I I, a second blower 32 is employed for exhausting the air from the compartment I6 and from about the bag 20. Exhaust blower 32 is connected with the compartments I6 and Il of ller I5 by means of a common duct 33, through a manifold 34, and through the dual ducts 35 and 36 as best illustrated in Fig. 2. Suitable screens 31 and 38 are vertically positioned within and rearwardly of the chambers I6 and I'I respectively to prevent feathers, foreign materials or other matter from entering the drying system through means of the suction created by the blower 32 in either of the ducts 35 or 36.

Manifold 25 provides a feather receiving chamber which generally covers the top of the filler I5 and has a solid central top section I4a to receive duct I4, and suitable screens I6a and Ila, as best shown in Fig. 2, flank section I4@ and cover the upper ends of the manifold portions above the compartments I6 and I'I. The screens I6a and I'Ia are selected according to conditions of operation and may be carried in interchangeable frames. The screen sizes may also be varied to suit operating conditions effected by the location of the drying systems and/or the humidity variations at the site of installation.

Suction through either of the ducts 35 or 36 is controlled by a damper 39 in manifold 34.

When damper 39 is in the broken line position in Fig. 2, suction prevails in compartment I6, but if moved into the dot and dash line position, compartment I'I will be under suction. The action of damper 39 is synchronized with the action of damper 26. This is done by extending the shaft 29 of damper 26 to drive a vertical shaft 40 through gears 4I and 42 and by means of the drive being transmitted from shaft 40 through a belt 43 connected with a pulley 44 secured to the shaft 45 of damper 39.

Each compartment I6 and I'I has air intake ducts 46 and 4l' with dampers 48 and 49 controlling the inlet openings of each of the ducts respectively. Deflecting baiiles 58 and 5I direct the cooler inlet air downwardly into the compartments of the iiller I5. 'I'he inlet air that enters either of the compartments will mix with the air forced and sucked through the feather bags 20 reducing the temperature in the compartments to approximately F. In this manner, the air in the compartments is cooled, dropping the pressure in such compartments to aid the exhaust blower in producing the pressure differential between the interior and exterior of the 5i bags' 211;. theeair: coming in: through; duets'.V 4.5:rv and 4dr: a'lsoin replenishiiigtain lossefronuthee sys-temapressure' differential'f` is; alsof. established thrnugh.: ai differential .I speed operatiomor .by the selectionrof. capacity ratings-bfi thetwo; bldw= f LLL andan Blower |.l121,.drivem byrawmoter-521 delivers. approxmrately: 3R00? cubic feet of". airf per minute. in; installation; whilevthe' blower 32', driverr by a. motor 6:33. exhausts. approximately 400D; cubic: feetrof ain pen minute..v Theselfigurfes aswell'. others:` than may: be2: statedf are exemplaizyl do. not rcpresentzany limitationseiny thel opeiationof the feather drier: ofi-"thee design:- herei-nz. disclosed. Also.. while the;l device:` has been shown having two bag-.'iillinge-compartments; it is contemplated: tuse. threce-or more such compartments with multiple damper controls to regulate the feather delivery andthe evacuation of air: from each selected: bag;v filling, compartment.

Screens IBa and Ha function: -astameans for diverting free. air. from. withinthe. bags within the compartments ISand" ITduring the time the bags.are being filled. A bag such as 20 in compartmentl I5 willN allow most! of' the air-carrying feathers through-duct--l-d-tcpassithroughftheibag fabricfandi to-be withdrawn by-tlieexhaust blower 32.. Very' little will-initially pass through the manifold screen` I6a-K. sir-icel the'featherl airmi-x wiIli'folloW-"the cou-rse ofleast'resis-tance. A's the bag: begins.: to fill-,- the featlrerswill gradually" fill tliebag closingthe fabric to air'passage--so that the. airL fromduet ldwill-- automatically be released through: screen Illa.: steadily increasing arrnmmts':y Part ofVV the'V air' still go intoV the bag delivering feathers thereto and such air is drawn off through the suction of blower 32, depositing a concentration of feathers within the big until such bag is completely filled.

Obviously some feathers will cling to the screen 16a because of the bypassed air bleeding therethrough, but the area and mesh of the screen is made large enough to permit the passage of free air to efliciently carry out the bag filling operation. Such feathers will drop oif of the screen when the air is diverted to the other compartment. Any feathers left on the screen will subsequently be drawn into an empty bag when the immediate compartment is again set in operation.

To complete the cycle of operation of the system, exhaust blower 32 withdraws air from the filler l5 or from the respective compartments thereof and forces such air through a duct 54 back to the intake duct 2 of the heater l. This air will carry some moisture due to the lower temperature of about 140 F. from the initial 300 F. in the drying chamber 8 due to natural condensation so that a suitable vent means is interposed in the last part of the cycle of operation of the drying system to allow for diversion of some of the moisture and air prior to reentering the heater I.

This is accomplished by means of the vent duct 55 that connects with duct 54 between blower 32 and heater l and this vent duct may be arranged to discharge bypassed air and moisture through a wail or ceiling of the building to atmosphere. A damper 56 is shown in Fig. l having suitable regulatory mechanism 51 for controlling the angular position of the damper to regulate the amount of air and moisture diversion necessary to obtain the best results for continuing the feather drying process described.

Duct 55 will also serve to permit air to reverse therethrough and enter the drying system if the iii? 6) suction.. ofi airfl is: interrupted from thee filler;N to blowen' orv through. ai. blower breakdown as thee case manv be'.. It isi' possible. that oneof the screens: 37; or.l 358i may' become.- clogged with feathersrsasamay; occurY from. a-breakH in the Yf abrio of'abag being filled;` Ehesuction of blower 32 'would tlien draw` the feathers out of: the bag and upagainst the vertical: screen.. Screens 31." and were made large enough tozforestall any blockage. that: would cause serious interference with. he operation; of the. dryingsystem. Atany tlfieisystem may be kept' in operation long enough: to clear the feathers outl of the ducts and drieriff necessary, or to' switch'the filling .f operation to-aniother filler compartment-.until the condition causing;V air.' flow. retardation is found andi remedied:

Ghangesandmodificationsin the exact design, construction and.'V combination of units or parts asiwelli as substitution of: equivalent mechanisms are contemplated in the feather drying; system. Stich. deviations# inf the design of' this' invention shall-i be: governedl bythe scope ofthe appended claims :r directed.` thereto.

What@ If claimv is :l

1i. A: featherdfryingsystem comprising: a drying chamber; a heater;y a first blower toforce air through said heater intensa-ide drying chamber; aafecd meansftd feedwetfeathers inte the hot streams ii-i-y ad-.vance of said d'r-ying-f chamber; alsecond-'blowcr to draw dry feathers and hota-ir outfof saidf chamber, a-` bag filling compartment connected fio-receive saidv airsfeather mix; means said co-iripart'rnentv forv reieasably supporting'V a bag in a position to catch the feathers from said second blower, and a conduit connected between said filling compartment and said first blower to exhaust air from the space within said compartment and surrounding said bag, said first blower having a greater volumetric capacity than said second blower to produce a lower pressure in the filling compartment space surrounding the feather receiving bag than in the interior of said bag.

2. A feather drying system comprising a drying chamber, a heater, a first blower to force air through said heater into said drying chamber, a feed means to feed wet feathers into the hot air stream in advance of said drying chamber, a second blower to draw dry feathers and hot air out of said chamber, a bag filling compartment connected to receive said air feather mix, means in said compartment for releasably supporting a bag in a position to catch the feathers from said second blower, and a conduit connected between said filling compartment and said first blower to exhaust air from the space within said compartment and surrounding said bag, said first blower having a greater volumetric capacity than said second blower to produce a lower pressure in the filling compartment space surrounding the feather receiving bag than in the interior of said bag, and an atmospheric bleed duct for said filling compartment to allow cool air to enter the space around said bag reducing the temperature of the air in said space and to supply fresh air to said drying system, said bleed duct having adjustable control means to regulate the amount of air entering said filling compartment.

3. A bag filling device for a feather drying system comprising at least two bag filling compartments, a first blower to supply dried feathers and air under pressure to said compartments, a second blower to exhaust air from said compartments and from the space surrounding the bags in said compartments, cooperative dual duct means leading from said first blower to the compartments and from the latter to said second blower, and synchronized damper mechanisms for vsaid dual duct means connected to alternately serve one or the other of said compartments whereby a full bag of feathersI may be withdrawn from either compartment and replaced with an empty one.

4. A bag lling device for a feather drying system comprising at least two bag lling compartments, a first blower to supply dried feathers and air under pressure to said compartments, a second blower to exhaust air from said compartments and from the space surrounding the bags in said compartments, cooperative dual duct means leading from said rst blower to the compartments and from the latter to said second blower, and synchronized damper mechanisms for said dual duct means connected to alternately serve one or the other of said compartments whereby a full bag of feathers may be withdrawn from either compartment and replaced with an empty one, said second blower having a greater volumetric capacity than said rst blower to produce a lower pressure in either of said compartments in the space surrounding the bag than within said bag during the operation of a compartment.

5. A bag lling device for a feather drying system comprising at least two bag filling compartments, a rst blower to supply dried feathers and air under pressure to said compartments, a second blower to exhaust air from said compartments and from the space surrounding the bags in said compartments, cooperative dual duct means leading from said rst blower to the compartments and from the latter to said second blower, and synchronized damper mechanisms for said dual duct means connected to alternately serve one or the other of said compartments whereby a full bag of feathers may be withdrawn from either compartment and replaced with an empty one, said' compartments having individual doors for ingress thereto, and said synchronized damper mechanism having operating means connected therewith to provide visual means each disposed at a predetermined position with respect to said individual doors to indicate which compartment is in operation.

ARTHUR M. SCHROEDER.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the i'lle of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Huttner et al Mar. 2.1948

Patent Citations
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US1934410 *May 31, 1930Nov 7, 1933Celite CorpMethod of fractionally separating pulverulent materials
US1942868 *Apr 16, 1932Jan 9, 1934Mitchell John EMethod of and apparatus for drying cotton
US1945296 *May 29, 1933Jan 30, 1934Louis GordonApparatus for cleaning and sterilizing feathers
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US2347431 *Dec 24, 1942Apr 25, 1944American Laundry Mach CoFeather handling apparatus
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2688376 *Oct 27, 1951Sep 7, 1954Daniel T OertelAir scrubber
US2794454 *Jun 16, 1955Jun 4, 1957Moulthrop Le Roy ETick filling machines
US3432307 *Jun 15, 1965Mar 11, 1969Christiaan Marie Van GinnekenMethod and apparatus for preparing a mixed product
US3601955 *Apr 30, 1969Aug 31, 1971Luwa AgApparatus for separating fibers from a conveying air stream
US3693836 *Nov 10, 1970Sep 26, 1972York Feather & Down CorpFilling machine
US3964175 *Nov 11, 1974Jun 22, 1976Michael SivetzCoffee roasting system
US5199244 *Mar 12, 1990Apr 6, 1993Products Unlimited, Inc.Pillow filling apparatus
US5323819 *Jan 7, 1993Jun 28, 1994Shade Charles LOverhead vacuum assembly for recovering, storing and dispensing flowable packaging materials
US7886459 *Mar 8, 2007Feb 15, 2011John R. RuessApparatus for assisting in fluid removal from fluid storage bladder and the like
Classifications
U.S. Classification34/280, 55/467, 8/94.10R, 141/248, 8/94.10D, 141/67
International ClassificationF26B17/00, F26B17/10
Cooperative ClassificationF26B17/101
European ClassificationF26B17/10B