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Publication numberUS2574929 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 13, 1951
Filing dateDec 9, 1949
Priority dateDec 9, 1949
Publication numberUS 2574929 A, US 2574929A, US-A-2574929, US2574929 A, US2574929A
InventorsJohn R Mcclain
Original AssigneeJohn R Mcclain
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Automatic electric circulation heater for automobiles
US 2574929 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Nov. 13, 1951 J MCCLAIN 2,574,929

AUTOMATIC ELECTRIC CIRCULATION HEATER FOR AUTOMOBILES Filed Dec. 9, 1949 IN VEN TOR.

BY Jahn RM Clai/z 9 WQQ QZ A TTORNEYS Patented Nov. 13, 1951 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE AUTOMATIC ELECTRIC CIRCULATION HEATER FOR AUTOMOBILES John R. McClain, Wooster, Ohio Application December 9, 1949, Serial No. 132,003

Claims. 1

The invention relates to heaters for the circulating cooling fluid in automobile motors and radiators, and more particularly to an automatic, electric, thermostatically controlled heater.

It is an object of the invention to provide a simple, economic heater which may be quickly and easily mounted in the hose line between the lower end of the radiator and the water pump of the motor.

Another object is to provide such a heater which is easily adapted for installation upon the motor of any automobile.

A further object is to provide a heater of this character which is automatically and thermostatically controlled.

A still further object is to provide such a heater which is easily adjustable to maintain the desired temperature.

The above objects together with others which will be apparent from the drawing and following description or which may be later referred to, may be attained by constructing the improved heater in the manner hereinafter described in detail and illustrated in the accompanying drawing, in which:

Figure 1 is a fragmentary, side elevation, on a small scale, showin the radiator and a portion of the motor of an automobile with the improved heater mounted in the hose line between the lower end of the radiator and the water pump;

Fig. 2 is a side elevation of the improved heater, showing th same actual size; and

Fig. 3 a longitudinal, sectional view through the heater, showing the heating unit therein.

Referring now more particularly to the embodiment of the invention illustrated in the drawing, in which similar numerals refer to similar parts throughout the several views, a portion of an automobile engine block is shown at I0, with the corresponding portion of the cylinder head indicated at I I, the water pump I2 being mounted upon the front of the engine block.

The radiator is shown at I3, the upper portion thereof being connected by the usual flexible hose I4 to the cylinder head I I and the lower end thereof being connected by a flexible hose I5 to the water pump l2.

The improved heater to which the invention pertains, is indicated generally at I6, and as shown in Fig. 1 is installed in the hose line l5, between the lower end of the radiator and the water pump. Thi heater comprises a cylindrical casing, preferably formed of two similar halves I! having interlockin meeting edges I8 which may be sweated or otherwise rigidly connected together.

Each cylindrical section I 'I of the casing terminates outwardly in a frusto-conical portion I 9 upon which a reduced neck 20 is formed. The meeting edges of the cylindrical sections I! have spaced pairs of half-round notches 2| therein to accommodate the terminal posts 22 which are located through and brazed or otherwise rigidly connected within these notches and are attached to opposite ends of the heatin element 23. This heating element may be any conventional heating unit, preferably double protected by being sealed in magnesium oxide covered with a non-corrosive copper sheath. No claim is made to this particular type of heating element, which is obtainable upon the market.

A thermostat, which is also of conventional construction and obtainable upon the market, is indicated generally at 24, and is mounted upon the cylindrical casing I 'I-l 1, preferably by bending the terminal ears 25 thereof angularly, as shown in the drawing, and brazing or otherwise connecting them to the frusto-conical portions I9 of the casing.

An adjusting screw 26 is provided upon the thermostat for adjusting the temperature control,

and a pair of terminal posts 21 are provided upon the thermostat.

To install the improved heater in an automobile, truck, bus, tractor, or stationary engine, an intermediate section of the flexible hose I5 is removed and the ends of the remaining portions of this hose are slipped over the reduced necks 20 of the heater casing, and clamped thereon as indicated at 28 in Fig. 1.

One terminal post 22, of the heating unit, is connected to one terminal post 27 of the thermostat, as by a wire 29. Wires 30 and 3! connect the other terminal post 22 of the heatin unit and the other terminal post 2? of the thermostat respectively to a receptacle 32, which may be mounted at some convenient position upon the car outside of the hood, preferably upon the apron just back of the front bumper.

In order to operate the heater, an extension cord 33, connected to a v. A. C. or D. C. current outlet, and provided with a conventional connection plug 34, is plugged into the receptacle 32 as indicated in Fig. 1.

The heating unit 23 is thus activated, heating the water or other cooling fluid in the circulating system of the radiator and water jacket of the motor, the temperature being automatically controlled by the thermostat, thus not only protecting the motor and radiator from freezing, but guaranteeing dependable quick starting of the motor in the coldest weather, regardless of the length of time the car may have been standing, assuring heating of the inside of the car with the hot water heater much quicker than under ordinary circumstances and greatly prolonging the life of the battery.

All parts ofthe improved heater are, formed of brass, copper or other non-corrosive material so that the same is completely rust-resistant.

I claim:

1. As an article of manufacture, a heater for" the cooling fluid in internal combustion engines and radiators therefor, provided with a hose connecting the radiator and the water jacket of theengine, said heater comprising cylindrical casing, means at each end of the casing for insertion into said hose, a heating element of coil type located within the cylindrical casing, a non-corrosive metal sheath coverin the heating element coil, insulation surrounding the heating element,

coil and sealed within said non-corrosive sheath,

conductor means; connected .to opposite ends of the heating element coil, and an electric recepta:

cle connected to said conductor means and 10- cated at a point spaced from the enginawhereby a 110 volt source of electric power may be detachably connectedv to said heatingelementtcoil' through said receptacle;

2. As an article of manufacture, a heater for the coolingrfluid in internal combustion engines and, radiators therefor, provided withla hose con-,-

located within the cylindrical casing,;a non-corrosive metal sheath covering the heating element coil, insulation surrounding the heating element;

coil and sealed Within said non-corrosive sheath,

a thermostat associated with the casing, conductor mean connectin one end of the heating element coil to-one side of the thermostat, conductor means connected to the opposite end of the heating element coil and the opposite side of the. thermostat, and an electric receptacle connectedzto said last namedconductor'means andlocated at r a point spaced from the engine, whereby a 110.

volt source of electric power may be detachably connected to said heating :element coil through said thermostat and said receptacle.

3. As an article of manufacture'a heater for:-

the, cooling fluid in internal combustionengines and. radiators therefonprovidedwith a. hose con-; necting the radiator and the .water jacketof the,

engine, said heater comprising-a cylindricalacasing, said casing comprising two similar cylin drical sections having shouldered, interlocking meeting edges rigidly connected together, means ateach end of the casing for insertion into said hose, a heating elementof coil type located within the cylindrical casing, a non-corrosive metalsheath covering the heating element coil, insula-f tion surrounding the heating element coiland sealed within said non-corrosive sheath, conductor means connected to opposite ends of the.

heating element coil, and an electric receptacle connected to said conductor means and located at a point spaced from the engine, whereby a volt source of electric power may be detachably connected to' said heating element coil through said receptacle.

4. As anarticle of manufacture, a heater for the coolin fluid in internal combustion engines and'radia'tors therefor, provided with a hose connecting-the radiator and the water jacket of the engine, said heater comprising a cylindrical casing, said casing comprising two similar cylindrical sectionshaving shouldered, interlocking meeting edgesrigidly connected together, means at each end of the casing for insertion into said hose, a heating element of coil type located within the cylindrical ,casing, a non-corrosive metal sheath covering the heating element coil, insulation surrounding the heating element coil and sealed within said non-corrosive sheath, a thermostat associated with the casing, conductor meansconcoil and the opposite side of the thermostat, and an electric receptacleiconnectedto said last named conductor means and locatedyat ,-a point, spaced from the engine, whereby -a 110, volt source-of electric power may be detachably connected 'to said heating element coil through said thermostat and said receptacle.

5. As an article of manufacture, a heater-forthe cooling fluid in internal combustionengines and radiators, therefor, pli vided with-a hose C011? necting the radiator and the water Jacket of the.

engine, saidheaterloomprisin a cylindrical casin having a reduced neckdateeach endsof the. casing for insertion into said hose,.a heating ele.

ment of coil type located withinthe cy indrical casing, a non-corrosive 2 metal. sheathucovering, the heating element coil, insulation surrounding, the heating element coil and sealed Within,sai d non-corrosive sheath, a thermostat associated with the casing, conductor means connectingnone, end of the heating element coil to oneside oflthev thermostat, conductor means connected to the opposite end of the heating element coil and the opposite side of the thermostat, and an electric receptacle connected to said last named conductor means and located at;a point spaced from' the engine, whereby a 110 volt source of electric" power may be detachably'connected to said heating element coil through said thermostatand said receptacle.

JOHN R. MCCLAIN.

REFERENCE S CITED j.

The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

UN I ED ST TES, HPATE N'ITS Number Name Date 1,482,574 Meyer; Feb-5, 1924- 1,7l4,607 Manierre ,May 28,1929 1,727,959, 1 Bowen: Sept. 10,1929 1,759,969 Turnwald. May 2'7, 1930; 2,505,285 Gratsinger Apr. 25, 1950,

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1482574 *Feb 15, 1920Feb 5, 1924 Eleotbioal hea
US1714607 *Dec 19, 1924May 28, 1929Manierre GeorgeHeating device
US1727959 *Jan 2, 1929Sep 10, 1929Bowen Kenneth HerbertElectrical heating unit
US1759969 *Nov 29, 1927May 27, 1930Turnwald WolfgangEngine heater
US2505286 *Jul 19, 1946Apr 25, 1950Gratsinger PaulMotor heater
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4208570 *Sep 5, 1978Jun 17, 1980Canadian General Electric Company LimitedThermostatically controlled electric engine coolant heater
US4924069 *Nov 19, 1987May 8, 1990Teledyne Industries, Inc.Hot water supply for tubs
US6010076 *Aug 26, 1997Jan 4, 2000Winik; Charles DavidHeater core enhancer for use in warming up an automobile
US8933372 *Jun 10, 2009Jan 13, 2015Dynacurrent Technologies, Inc.Engine pre-heater system
US20130206744 *Jun 10, 2009Aug 15, 2013Ray KingEngine pre-heater system
Classifications
U.S. Classification392/489, 123/142.50E, 219/510, 219/208
International ClassificationF02N19/10
Cooperative ClassificationF02N19/10
European ClassificationF02N19/10