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Publication numberUS2575008 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 13, 1951
Filing dateMar 16, 1949
Priority dateMar 16, 1949
Publication numberUS 2575008 A, US 2575008A, US-A-2575008, US2575008 A, US2575008A
InventorsAbraham L Dorgin
Original AssigneeAbraham L Dorgin
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Method of creping nylon
US 2575008 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Patented Nov. 13, 1951 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE METHOD OF CREPING NYLON Abraham L. Dorgin, New York, N. Y.

No Drawing. Application March 16, 1949, Serial No. 81,845

14 Claims. 1

This invention relates to the formation of a nylon crepe fabric.

An object of the invention is to provide a creped fabric without embossing or similar process and which, in its finished state, consists solely of nylon or any other similar synthetic yarn.

A further object is to provide a yarn of the character hereafter described which may be woven into fabrics along with other yarns to produce novel effects in the cloth.

I use a yarn which comprises nylon or similar synthetic yarn combined with raw silk in one thread. It may be thrown with half right twist and half left twist or with a one way twist. The number of turns given the yarn is determined substantially by the size of the thread desired. For example, the combination of a 40 denier filament yarn with one end of 20 to 22 denier raw silk would be given about 60 to 65 turns per inch. The silk would constitute about 25% to 50% of the yarn by weight.

This yarn is then used in the manufacture of fabrics either for warp, or filling, or both, depending upon the construction of the cloth desired.

The woven or knitted fabric is boiled off in the usual manner. This boiling off process causes the silk to shrink or contract. In shrinking or contracting, the silk contracts or crinkles the nylon or similar synthetic yarn with which it has been thrown imparting a creped or crinkled effect to the fabric. The nylon or similar synthetic yarn is then set in the aforementioned contracted positi n by the application of heat. The degree of heat applied depends on the type and construction of the fabric but for the reasons set forth below it is desirable that in all cases this degree of heat exceed the boiling point of water.

I have found that the boiling off process supplies sufficient heat to the nylon or other similar synthetic yarn to set it without the necessity of the setting procedure described above. However, the setting by the boil off process sets the nylon or similar synthetic yarn only to the extent of the degree of heat of boiling water, viz., 212 F. I prefer, therefore, after the boil off to set the nylon or similar synthetic yarn at a temperature in excess of the boiling point of water to avoid any possible damage in the laundering process of the finished garment.

The nylon or similar synthetic yarn having been set, it will retain its creped position and is no longer dependent upon the silk for this purpose.

the fabric in a hot caustic solution, the strength Accordingly, the silk is dissolvedby immersing of which depends upon the construction of the cloth itself. The fabric is then treated with an acid bath which neutralizes any of the caustic solution which may remain on the fabric. This caustic solution and acid bath may, if desired, be employed before the setting by the application of heat described above because as shown above, the boiling off process supplies a sufiicient setting to the nylon or other similar synthetic yarn to allow for the removal of the silk after such setting.

The silk having been completely dissolved and removed from the fabric, the result is a fabric which is nylon or similar synthetic yarn with a permanently set creped effect.

Fabrics, when made and finished as set forth above have all of the advanta es of nylon or similar synthetic fabrics as heretofore made with the added advantage that the creped structure forms air pockets and therefore prevents the clinging of the garment to the body of the wearer.

A spun nylon may be used instead of a continuous filament with the same results.

It will be appreciated that many uses may be made of a fabric constructed in accordance with the aforesaid invention but the essential feature of the invention is the contracting and setting of the nvlon or similar synthetic yarn so that it imparts a creped effect to the fabric.

Thrown silk may be used in the place and stead of raw silk.

It is of course possible to form the com osite threads of n lon material and silk and treat them to contract the silk on the nylon thread to produce the creped effect, then treat the thus cre ed composite thread to remove the silk, and then form a fabric of the creped nylon threads, if desired.

I claim:

1. A method of making a fabric wholly of nylon which comprises forming a fabric with yarn consisting of nylon combined with silk. shrinking the silk to give a creped position to the nylon, setting the nylon in this creped position by the application of heat, and dissolving the silk to remove it from the fabric.

2. A method of making a nylon fabric which com rises forming a fabric with yarn consisting of nylon combined with silk, shrinking the silk to give a creped position to the nylon, and dissolving the silk to remove it from the fabric.

3. A method of making a fabric wholly of nylon yarn which comprises forming a fabric comprising nylon yarn combined with silk, shrinking the silk to give the nylon a crinkled effect, and dissolving the silk to remove it from the fabric.

4. A method of making a creped fabric wholly of nylon which comprises forming a fabric with' a yarn comprising nylon combined with silk in one thread, boiling off the fabric and shrinking the silk which in turn gives a crinkled position to the nylon, setting the nylon in this crinkled position by the application of heat and dissolving the silk and removing it from the fabric by 'mmerslng the fabric in a hot caustic solution and then in a neutralizing acid bath.

5. A method of making a fabric wholly of nylon yarn which comprises forming a fabric comprising such nylon yarn combined with silk in one thread, boiling oil the fabric and shrinking the silk which in turn gives a creped position to the nylon yarn, setting the nylon yarn in this creped position by the application of heat and dissolving the silk and removing it from the fabric by immersing the fabric in a hot caustic solution and in a neutralizing acid bath.

6. A method of making a creped fabric wholly of nylon which comprises forming a fabric with a yarn comprising nylon combined with silk, immersing the fabric in boiling water to shrink the silk which in turn gives a creped position to the nylon, heat setting the nylon in this creped position, and dissolving the silk and removing it from the fabric by immersing the fabric in a hot caustic solution and in a neutralizing acid bath.

7. A method of making a creped fabric wholly of a nylon yarn which comprises forming a fabric comprising such nylon yarn combined with silk, boiling off the fabric and shrinking the silk which in turn gives a creped position to the nylon yarn, heat setting the nylon yarn in this creped position and dissolving the silk and removing it from the fabric by immersing the fabric in a hot caustic solution and in a neutralizing acid bath.

8. A method of making yarn wholly of nylon which comprises combining the yarn with silk, shrinking the silk to give a creped position to the nylon, heat setting the nylon in this creped position, and dissolving the silk to remove it from the yarn.

9. A method of making creped yarn wholly of nylon which comprises combining nylon yarn with silk to form a composite yarn, boiling off the composite yarn and shrinking the silk thus giving a creped position to the nylon yarn, setting the nylon yarn in this creped position by the application of heat and moisture and dissolving the silk and removing it from the nylon yarn by immersing the composite yarn in a hot caustic solution and in a neutralizing bath.

10. A method of making a creped fabric comprising nylon yarn which includes the s ps of boiling off a fabric formed of a combined yarn of nylon and silk thereby shrinking the silk to crepe the nylon, subjecting said fabric to wet steam at a temperature in excess of the boiling oif temperature. and then treating the fabric with an aqueous caustic solution to remove th silk.

11. A method of making a nylon fabric having a pebbly surface comprising the steps of boiling off a fabric made of a combined yarn of nylon and silk to shrink the silk and pebble the nylon, subjecting said fabric to wet steam at a temperature in excess of 212 F., and then treating the fabric in a caustic solution to remove the silk.

12. A method of making a creped nylon fabric comprising the steps of forming a composite yarn by throwing nylon and silk, forming said yarn into a fabric, immersing said fabric in boiling water to shrink the silk and crepe 'the nylon, then applying moisture at a temperature in excess of 212 F. to said fabric, and treating said fabric with caustic'solution to remove the silk.

13. A method of making a crinkled nylon yarn including the steps of combining silk and nylon into a composite yarn of high twist, boiling 01! said composite yarn to shrink the silk and crinkle the nylon, heat setting the nylon and treating the composite yarn in a caustic solution to remove the silk.

14. A method of making a creped nylon fabric including the steps of forming a fabric of a composite yarn of nylon and silk, boiling of! the fabric to shrink the silk and crepe the nylon, immersing the fabric in a boiling caustic solution to remove the silk. and treating the fabric with a neutralizing bath.

ABRAHAM L. DORGIN.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 2,006,542 Dreyfus July 2, 1935 2,020,907 Rubin Nov. 12, 1935 2,197,896 Miles, Jr Apr. 23, 1940 2,287,099 Hardy et al June23, 1942 2,290,253 Schneider July 21, 1942 2,332,738 Meade Oct. 26, 1943 FOREIGN PATENTS Number Country Date 552,138 Great Britain Mar. 24, 1943 576,050 Great Britain Mar. 15, 1946

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2006542 *Apr 15, 1930Jul 2, 1935Dreyfus HenryTextile fabric
US2020907 *Feb 20, 1933Nov 12, 1935American Silk Mills IncYarn and the fabric produced therefrom
US2197896 *Feb 15, 1937Apr 23, 1940Du PontArtificial wool
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GB552138A * Title not available
GB576050A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2711627 *Sep 2, 1954Jun 28, 1955Chadolon IncMethod of producing composite yarn
US2740183 *Dec 19, 1951Apr 3, 1956RhodiacetaMethod of producing creped fabric
US2771759 *Aug 3, 1954Nov 27, 1956Patentex IncTextile product and method
US2778187 *Sep 2, 1954Jan 22, 1957Patentex IncComposite yarn
US2806367 *Jun 25, 1957Sep 17, 1957Chadbourn Gotham IncLadies' full-fashioned hose having a non-bulky seam
US2810184 *Jun 17, 1953Oct 22, 1957Harold F ShermanMethod for producing a woven elastic bandage or like fabric
US2857651 *Apr 3, 1956Oct 28, 1958Collins & Aikman CorpCurled yarns, curled yarn fabrics and method for making same
US2919534 *Nov 2, 1955Jan 5, 1960Deering Milliken Res CorpImproved textile materials and methods and apparatus for preparing the same
US3189972 *Jun 20, 1960Jun 22, 1965Paul Vernier Valentin & Fils SProcess for the manufacture of elastic fabric
US3222859 *Apr 19, 1961Dec 14, 1965RhodiacetaCrimping of yarns based on thermoplastic polymers
US3268384 *Mar 23, 1964Aug 23, 1966Stevens & Co Inc J PNovelty glass fabric
US3340736 *Sep 15, 1964Sep 12, 1967Nihon Denchi KabushikiDevice for indicating specific gravity of liquids
US3377678 *Dec 27, 1965Apr 16, 1968Nihon Vinylon Co LtdHalf-soluble special fabric and a method of manufacturing embroidery lace thereon
US3377794 *Mar 30, 1964Apr 16, 1968Deering Milliken Res CorpMethod of forming textured yarn
US3399521 *Jul 7, 1966Sep 3, 1968Zwirnerei Und Nahfadenfabrik GProcess and apparatus for the texturing of yarns and the like
US4199633 *May 16, 1978Apr 22, 1980Phillips Petroleum CompanyNapped double knit fabric and method of making
US4485535 *Feb 11, 1982Dec 4, 1984Toray Industries, Inc.Methods of manufacturing pile fabric
Classifications
U.S. Classification28/155, 87/13, 57/239, 57/245, 66/178.00A, 8/DIG.160, 57/351, 8/114.5, 139/428, 28/168, 8/DIG.210, 66/202, 139/426.00R, 57/244, 8/114.6
International ClassificationD02G1/18
Cooperative ClassificationD02G1/18, Y10S8/21, Y10S8/16
European ClassificationD02G1/18