Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS2577642 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 4, 1951
Filing dateSep 25, 1948
Priority dateSep 25, 1948
Publication numberUS 2577642 A, US 2577642A, US-A-2577642, US2577642 A, US2577642A
InventorsLuttgen William H, Woolslayer Homer J
Original AssigneeMoore Corp Lee C
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Oil well derrick
US 2577642 A
Images(4)
Previous page
Next page
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Dec. 4, 1951 H. J. WOOLSLAYER EI'AL 2,577,642

OIL WELL DERRICK Filed Sept. 25, 1948 4 Sheets-Sheet 1 VENTORS.

W 4%. Q ZQWAWJ 8620/9444,

W A 7' TORNE Y5.

Dec. 4, 1951 H. J. WOOLSLAYER ET AL OIL WELL DERRICK 4 Sheets-Sheet 2.

Filed Sept. 25, 1948 Dec. 4, 1951 H. J. WOOLSLAYER ETAL 2,577,642

OIL WELL DERRICK Filed Sept. 25, 1948 4 Sheets-Sheet 3 Dec. 4, 1951 H. J. WQOLSLAYER ETAL 2,577,542

OIL WELL DERRICK Filed Sept. 25, 1948 4 Sheets-Sheet 4 M a 7- ropxvs rs.

Patented Dec. 4, 1951 H. Luttgen, Tulsa,- Okla., assignors to Lee G. Moore Corporation, Pittsburgh, Pa., a corporation of Pennsylvania Application-September 25, 1948, Serial No. 51,226

; This inventionrelates to portable oil well-derricks, and more particularly to those which include masts that can be divided transversely into long. sections for transportation on'trucks andthe like. When such masts are taken down and loaded upon trucks or are unloaded'and assembled, they have required, inaddition to the trucks that transport them, the services of other trucks equipped with gin poles and winches.

It is among the objects of this invention to provide portable oil well derrick equipment including a mast which can be transported from one location to another by a single truck and which can be loaded thereon and unloaded without the services of a gin pole truck. Another object is to provide a new method of loading such a mast on a vehicle and unloading it therefrom. c

Inaccordance with this invention an oil: well mast has an upper section and a lower section detachably connected together. The upper section may be further subdivided if desired. At least the lower section has an open front. A track extends lengthwise of the outside of the back of the upper section, while bearing members are carried by the. upper end of thelower section. Means are provided for "pivotally' connecting the lower end of the mast to a substructure so that the mast can be swung forward and downward from 'an upright position to a prone'position to permit its upper section to rest on-a vehicle that is to transport it to another location. Means, such as a winch on the vehicle, is provided for lifting the front end of the prone lowersection after it has been disconnected from the prone upper section to set the bearing members on the track. Movement of the'vehicle toward the substructure will then telescope the upper section of the mast into" its lower section which isnot disconnected. from the substructure until the mast sections have been nested on the vehicle-The lower end of the mast preferably is pivotally connected to the rear end of an arm means which is pivoted at itsfront end on a horizontal axis to the top of the substructure of which it forms a part. When the mast is swung down onto the vehicle, the arm means can swing upward to permit' the lower end of the mast to rise so that the mast can lie flat onthe vehicle while still attached to the substructure.

' The invention is illustrated in the accompanying drawings in which Fig. 1 is a plan view of the substructure; Fig. .2 is, a side view thereof with one of the side members broken away; :Figs.'3

8 Claims. (of. ice- 15) to 6 are line drawings of the 'side. of :the derrick showing the mast in several successive positions as it is loaded on a truck; Fig. '7 is a fragmentary side view of. the connected ends of the upper and lower sections of the prone mast; Fig. 8 is similar to the preceding viewbut with the lower section of the mast disconnected from and straddling the upper section;v Fig. 9 is a cross section of the masttaken on the-line IX,-IX of Fig. 8; and Fig. 10 is a. crosssection of the mast taken on the line X-X of Fig. 6.

Referring to Figs. land 2 of the drawings, the substructure I is, a strong framework formed from structural steel members suitably connected together, and has two vertical side frames 2 connected by cross members 3 and by a remov able horizontal frame 4 atits front end. The substructure is provided'with arm means which consists of a pair of horizontal arms 6 connected at. their front ends to horizontal pivots lin the upper part ofthe side-frames. The upper surfaces of'the arms preferably are flush with the upper surface ofthe rest of the substructure.

Mounted on the rear end of each arm isa shoe vblock need not be described here because by now it is-well known in this art. Themast is formed from upper and lower sections l1=and I8 which'are detachably connected together by removable fasteners [9 through their. legs,- as shown in Fig. 7. At least the. lower section has an open front which faces down when the-mast isprone, as shown in Figs. 9 and 10, and the front'of the mast preferably is wider than its back for a-reason that soon will appear. The upper section may be formed from shorter sec: tions detachably connected end to end if desired.

It is a feature of this invention that a track extends lengthwise of the outsideof the back of upper section I! of the mast. The track may be formed from a pair-of parallel angle'bars 2| secured to the back girts 22 of the mast. Mounted inside-the upper or front end of lower section l8 of the prone mast is-a pair of bearing members, such as rollers 23 shown in Fig. 7, which are carried by side girts 24. These rollers are spaced apart such a distance that they can roll on the track. The rear ends of the track rails have extensions 26 that are inclined downward and toward the substructure and are provided with upwardly curved ends 21 in which the rollers normally are disposed. When-the mast is in its prone position and fasteners I9 are removed, the rollers can be supported by these curved ends of the track. Between the substructure and the side girts 24 that support the rollers the front legs of the mast are provided tension 26 until they rest in the curved lower ends 21 of the rails. This leaves the two sections of the mast in position to be connected to- I gethenby fastening members 19 (Figs. 3 and 7) with perforated lugs 28 towhich the endsf of .a',

bridle line 29 can be detachably connected after the mast has been let down onto the truck.

The line then is passed over sheaves 3| mounted tion of the mast near its rear legs, and the loop to form a unitary mast that can be swung up into upright position in the usual manner. When the mast is upright the arms 6 are in their lower; horizontal position in the top of the substructure, and the front legs of the mast are connected to the; front shoes I2.

at the front end of the line is connected-toenother line 32 (Fig. 3) which is attached to a winch 33 mounted'on the .truck'directly behind the cab.

When it-is desired to lower the mastrfromupright operative position its front legsare disconnected from the front shoes l2 onthe'substructure; the lower sectionsof the front legs either then being swung back out of" the way or being disconnected from the mast.' The horizontal frame 4 is removed'from the substructure to form a bay for receiving the mast when necessary.

The mast then is swung forwardand down'in' a well known manner until its upper section rests prone on the truck. Regardless of the elevation of the truck relativeto the substructure, the mast will rest'flat on the: truck because the pivoted arms 6 permit thelower end-of the mast to rise above the substructure the-amount necessary to level the mast, as shown in Fig. 3'. Yet, the mast remains-connectedto the substructure through the arms. Fastening members l 9'then are removed in order to disconnect the upper andlower sections of the mast, and the bridle line 29-is connected to lugs and to the winch line 32 which then isreeled in to lift the upper or front end of the prone lower section [8 while the truck is being backed a short distance toward the substructure. This causes rollers 23 to roll up the inclined track extensions 26 and onto the main track as'shown in Figs; 4 and" 8. The bridle line then is disconnected from lugs 28'because the frontend oflower-section-IB now is supported astraddle of'the other section l-l by means of therollers and track, as shown in- Fig.

9. The taper of the mast from front to backpermits this straddling withouthaving to'lift the front-end of the lower-section as-high-as otherwise would be necessary. The truckthen is backed againso that the uppersectionl! of the mast'onthe truckwill move back through the lowersection which is prevented by the arms from moving; backward, as shown in'Fig.-5. In this way the upper section of the mast is telescoped into the lower section until thetwo=sections are nested with their front legs all resting on the truck as shown in Figs. '6 and 10; The rear legs of the lower section then -are-'disconnected from the substructure arms- 6 so that the truck can be driven away with the nested mast sections on it;

In erecting the'mast this'procedure is just reversed. That is, thetruck with themested-"mast sections on it is-backedup to the substructure and arms 6 are raisedso that their shoes 8 can be connected to the rear legs 9 of the lower section of the mast, ShOW-n"in' :Figi The It, will, be seen that this invention enables a mast'to be mounted insections on a single truck, or to be unloaded therefrom, without the use of atgin pole truck or any winch additional tothe oneon the truck carrying-the mast;

According to the provisions of the patent'statutes, wehave explained the principle of ourinvention-and have illustrated and described what we now consider to represent its best embodiment However, we desire to'haveit understood that, within the scope of the appended claims, the invention may be practiced' otherwise"than as specifically illustrated and described;

We claim:

1'. An oil wellderrick comprising a substructure, amast having an'upper section and; an open'front lower section'detachably connected together, said sections being of suchshape that the upper section is capable of being-telescoped' into the lower section when they-are disconnected from each other, a track extending lengthwise of the outside of the 'baok of said uppersection, bearing members carried by the'upper end of said, lower section, means pivotal'ly' connecting the lower end of the mastto the; substructure so that the mast can be swung forward "and down 'fromyan upright positionito'a prone position thus permitting its upper section, to restlon. a, vehicle, and means lifting the upper end. of, the, prone lower. section afterithas been disconnected from the prone upper section andseating; said hearing members on the. track, whereby movement of the vehicle toward thesubstructure will. telescope theuppersection; of the mast into its lower section, after whichv the-lower end of the-mast can be disconnected-fromthe substructure to permit the nested mast sections tocbe carried away by the, vehicle.v

2. An oil "well; derrick comprising a substructure, an. upwardly tapered uprightrmast, mounted thereon .havingwan upper; section and an open front lower; section. detachably connected: 'together, a tracki'extend-ing'lengthwise: oftheoutside; of the back of said upper section, Io1lers mounted" in the-,upper end: of said" lower section, meanspivotallyconnecting the lower'end of the mast tothe substructure so that the. mast: can berswung forwardxand down to aprone position thusv permittingiits upper section to rest-hon a vehicle, and means lifting the upper end ofthe prone lower-section after it has been disconnected from-the prone upper section and seating said rollers on the track, whereby movement or the vehicle towardrthe substructurewilltelescope the upper section of themast into its lower section, after which the lower end of the mast 'canbe disconnected from the substructureto permit the nested mast sections to be carried away by the vehicle;

'3. An oil'well derrick comprising a'substructure,.anuprightmast having an upper section and an'open front lower section detachably consnected together "and having front and rear legs .detachably ,mountedon the substructure, the masthaving forwardly diverging sides, ,a track ,extending lengthwiseof the outside of the back (of: said upper section, rollers mounted on opposite sides of the mast inside the upper end of said lower section about midway between said legs, means pivotally connecting said rear legs to the substructure so that the mast can be swung forward and down to a prone position movement or the vehicle toward the"--s\ib'striic-- ture, an upright mast mounted thereon having an upper section and an open front lower section thus permitting its upper section to rest on a vehicle, and means lifting the upper end of the prone lower section after it has been disconnected from the prone upper-section and seating said rollers on the track, whereby movement of the vehicle toward the substructure will telescope the upper section of the mast in its lower section, after which the rear legs of the mast can be disconnected from the substructure to permit the nested mast sections to be carried away by the vehicle.

4. An oil well derrick comprising a substructure, an upright mast mounted thereon having an upper section and an open front lower section detachably connected together, said sections being of such shape that the upper section is capable of being'telescoped into the lower section when they are disconnected from each other, a main track extending lengthwise of the outside of the back of said upper section, a track extension extending from the lower end of said main track forward into the mast, rollers mounted in the upper end of said lower section adjacent said track extension, means pivotally connecting the lower end of the mast to the substructure so that the mast can be swung forward and down to a prone position thus permitting its upper section to rest on a vehicle, and means lifting the upper end of the prone lower section after it has been disconnected from the prone upper section and rolling said rollers up said track extension to the main track, whereby movement of the vehicle toward the substructure will telescope the upper section of the mast into its lower section, after which the lower end. of the mast can be disconnected from the substructure to permit the nested mast sections to be carried away by the vehicle.

5. An oil well derrick comprising a substructure, an upright mast mounted thereon having an upper section and an open front lower section detachably connected together, said sections being of such shape that the upper section is capable of being telescoped into the lower section when they are disconnected from each other, a main track extending lengthwise of the outside of the back of said upper section, a track extension inclined from the lower end of said main track forward and downward into the upper end of said lower section, rollers supported by the opposite sides of said lower section in engagement with said track extension, means pivotally connecting the lower end of the mast to the substructure so that the mast can be swung forward and down to a prone position thus permitting its upper section to rest on a vehicle, and means lifting the upper end of the prone lower section after it has been disconnected from the prone' upper section and rolling said rollers up said track extension to the main track, whereby detachably connected togethe'rysaid' sections being of such shape that the upper section is capable of being telescoped into the lower section when they are disconnected from each other, a main track extending lengthwise of the out side of the back of said upper section, a track extension extending from the lower end of said main track forward into the mast and having .a downturned front end, rollers mounted in the upper end of said lower section behind said downturned track end in engagement with it, means pivotally connecting the lower end of the mast to the substructure so that the mast can be swung forward and down to a prone position thus permitting its upper section to rest on a vehicle, said rollers being supported by said downturned track end when the prone lower section of the mast is disconnected from the prone upper section, and means lifting the upper end of the disconnected lower section and rolling said rollers up ,said track extension to the main track, whereby movement of the truck toward the substructure will telescope the upper section of the mast into its lower section, after which the lower end of the mast can be disconnected from the substructure to permit the nested mast sections to be carried away by the vehicle.

7. An oil well derrick comprising a substructure, a mast having an upper section and an open front lower section detachably connected together, a track extending lengthwise of the outside of the back of said upper section, bearing members carried by the upper end of said lower section, said sections being of such shape that the upper section is capable of being telescoped into the lower section when they are disconnected from each other, a sheave mounted in the lower end of said upper section, means for pivotally connecting the lower end of the mast to the substructure so that the mast can be swung forward and down from an upright position to a prone position thus permitting its upper section to rest on a vehicle, and means connecting a line extending over said sheave to a point on said prone lower section below the sheave for lifting the upper end of the prone lower section after it has been disconnected from the prone upper section and seating said bearing members on the track, whereby movement of the vehicle toward the substructure will telescope the upper section of the mast into its lower section, after which the lower end of the mast can be disconnected from the substructure to permit the nested mast sections to be carried away by the vehicle.

8. In an oil well derrick, a substructure including a normally horizontal arm means pivoted at its front end on a horizontal axis to the top of the rest of the substructure, a mast having front and rear legs, and means pivotally connecting the lower ends of the rear legs of the mast to the rear end of said arm means so that the mast can be swung forward and down from an upright position to a prone position on 3, vehicle, said arm means being adapted to swing 7 upmi to permivsaid prone must to lie flat. on the -vehicm -HOMER, J WOJOLSLAYER.

CECIL JENKINS. WILLIAM H; LU'IYEGEN.

REFERENCES CITED 1 The following references are: of record in the me of this patent:

Number 8 U N ITED STATES. PATENTS Name Date:-v Grooms July "22, 1924 Barnes Jan. 23, 1934 Berner May- 14, 1940 Henry Aug. 6', '19'40 Selberg et a1. Dec; '7, 1943 Funk Mar-Q28, 1944 Lewis Apr. *18', 1944 St. John Jan. 18, 1949

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1501996 *Jan 22, 1923Jul 22, 1924Grooms George FVehicle for transporting poles
US1944833 *Oct 17, 1932Jan 23, 1934St Louis Structural Steel CoSupport
US2200589 *May 13, 1938May 14, 1940Hetherington & Berner IncPortable asphalt mixing plant construction
US2210407 *Sep 2, 1938Aug 6, 1940Lee C Moore & Company IncPortable derrick
US2336305 *Jan 27, 1941Dec 7, 1943Int Stacey CorpPortable derrick
US2345253 *Dec 28, 1940Mar 28, 1944American Steel Derrick CompanyPortable derrick
US2347115 *Oct 18, 1941Apr 18, 1944Frank N LewisDerrick construction
US2459198 *Aug 9, 1945Jan 18, 1949St John Erastus RTower structure
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2695081 *Apr 20, 1950Nov 23, 1954Moore Corp Lee CPortable well drilling apparatus
US2701039 *Jul 11, 1950Feb 1, 1955Moore Corp Lee COil well substructure for rotary drilling
US2742260 *Jul 17, 1953Apr 17, 1956Luther PattersonWell derrick
US2804948 *Sep 25, 1953Sep 3, 1957Moore Corp Lee CTelescoping portable mast
US2804949 *Mar 16, 1954Sep 3, 1957Moore Corp Lee CTelescoping portable mast
US2847097 *May 21, 1953Aug 12, 1958United States Steel CorpPortable mast
US4885893 *Sep 10, 1987Dec 12, 1989Imi Engineering, Co.Well mast structure
US5216867 *Nov 4, 1991Jun 8, 1993Sundowner Offshore Services, Inc.Well mast structure
US7306055 *Mar 1, 2005Dec 11, 2007Barnes R MichaelAutomatic method for installing mobile drilling rig at a drilling site
US7308953 *Mar 1, 2005Dec 18, 2007Barnes R MichaelMobile drilling rig
Classifications
U.S. Classification52/118, 52/111, 52/120
International ClassificationE21B15/00
Cooperative ClassificationE21B15/00
European ClassificationE21B15/00