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Publication numberUS2578600 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 11, 1951
Filing dateJan 4, 1949
Priority dateJan 4, 1949
Publication numberUS 2578600 A, US 2578600A, US-A-2578600, US2578600 A, US2578600A
InventorsJay Rose
Original AssigneeJay Rose
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Insulation device
US 2578600 A
Images(2)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Dec. 11, 1951 J. ROSE INSULATION DEVICE 2 SHEETS-SHEET 1 Filed Jan. 4, 1949 IN VEN TOR.

Dec. 11, ROSE INSULATION DEVICE Filed Jan. 4, 1949 INVENTOR Patented Dec. 11, 1951 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE INSULATION DEVICE Jay Rose, New York, N. Y.

Application January 4, 1949, Serial No. 69,179

Claims.

This application relates to thermal insulation and more particularly to insulating devices designed for preventing heat loss from heated surfaces.

The present application is a continuation in part of my applications Ser. No. 661,318 filed April 11, 1946, now abandoned, Ser. No. 661,319 filed April 11, 1946, now abandoned, Ser. No. 741,836 filed April 11, 1947, now abandoned, Ser. No. 37,934 filed July 9, 1948, now abandoned, and Ser. No. 46,571 flied August 26, 1948.

In my prior application Ser. No. 46,571, I have shown how fragile strips of brittle and friable heat insulating material, for example, diatomaceous earth,- expanded vermiculite, rock wool, glass wool, 85% magnesia, polystyrene foam block, etc., cut from common blocks of heat insulation, or moulded from like materials, may be used for making frames which may be handled and processed without easy breakage by re-enforcing the frame strips with strips of hard material, longitudinally and/or laterally, the hard strips imbedded in grooves cut out of the frame strips, along their lengths. I have also stated in this prior application that the frame sections may be tached to one side of my frame structure. It is obvious that the hard covering or closure piece will provide considerable re-enforcement to the fragile frame strips.

My present invention is for a similar device as shown and described in my prior application Ser. No. 46,571, the present invention having improvements in design, construction and assembly.

An object of my present invention is the making of a frame structure for supporting heat insulating material within the frame perimeter, the frame structure made from fragile strips of brittle and friable low thermal conductivity material, the same as is used in the making of common block heat insulation, and having re-enforcing means attached to the strips to prevent their easy breakage in handling and processing.

Another object of my present invention is the making of a device for insulating, the device having a frame made from strips of heat insulatingmaterial which strips may or may not have reenforcing means, and provided with new and novel means for supporting metallic fell as a heat insulating means within the perimeter of the 5 frame.

Another object of my present invention is the provision of means for preventing excessive bulging and possible breaking of metallic foil, if used as a heat insulating means within my frame, the

bulging or breaking due to increased air pressure within the frame from rising temperature of a heated surface which may be insulated with my devices, especially if the device is sealed to the surface.

Another object of my present invention is the utilization of a frame structure made from strips of heat insulation material and having means on the inner sides of the frame sections for support-v ing a base or flooring and a covering or roof for unbound heat insulating material within the perimeter of the frame, the unbound material having a better K factor than bound material.

For a more complete understanding of my present invention reference should be had to the accompanying drawing in which Fig; 1 is an end view in perspective of a frame strip of thermal insulating material, part being broken away.

Figs. 2, 3'and 4 are similar views showing different means for supporting heat insulating material within the frame.

Fig. 5 is a view of the insulating device'in the form of a finished frame containing heat insulating material.

5 Fig. 6 is a sectional view taken on the line 66 of Fig. 5,

Fig. 7 is an enlarged detail view of parts shown in Fig. 6.

Fig. 8 is a view, partly broken away, of a metal- 40 he foil heat insulating element.

Fig. 1 is a cross-sectional view of a strip cut from a common block of heat insulation which may be used for a section of my frame structure. The strip is indicated by the numeral 9. Fig. 2 is a cross-sectional view of a strip. indicated by the numeral 9a, the strip having a formed sheet-metal piece, angle shaped, along the narrow top of the strip and along its side. The formed metal is attached to the strip by screws preferably, through holes punched in the vertical flange portion, the screws indicated by the numeral II. The horizontal flange portion of the formed metal along the narrow topof the strip is indicated-by the numeral l0, and the vertical flange portion along the side is indicatedby essence 1.. the numeral its. l-loles indicated by the numeral 52, may be punched along the top flange it, the holes serving for later attachment, if preferred, of a roof or covering for the frame, which may be sheet-metal with corresponding holes punched along its edges and secured to the horizontal flange ID, with Parker screws through the holes in the covering and the holes H2, in the flange ill. The flange it], may also be tightened to the strip by holes punched in it for screws, the same as in the vertical flange Illa, the holes so punched as to allow the top screws to pass between the screws in the flange Ina. This formed sheet-metal piece along the top and side of the frame strip provides re-enforcement for the strip 9a. A similar metal angle piece may be attached to bottom of the strip. If two angle pieces are attached, the side flanges should be kept apart to prevent the heat from a heated surface, to which the device may be applied, from flowing through the metal to the top. Reenforcement may also be provided by a metal frame structure attached to the frame strips. For additional re-enforcement of the strip So, another sheet-metal angle piece may be attached to the side of the strip along its length,

as indicated by the numerals l3 and like, the numeral l3 indicating the vertical flange and l3a the horizontal flange of the angle piece. The

screws in the vertical flange through holespunched in it are indicated by the numeral Ila and holes'in the horizontal flange I30 by the numerals l2a. The holes [2a may serve for later attachment of a base or flooring whichmay be sheet-metal, for supporting unbound heat insulating material within the frame. If sheet-metal is used for the base or flooring, corresponding holes may be punched along its edges and secured to the flange l3a, by Parker screws through the holes in the floor piece and the holes l2a in the flange l3a. Instead of screws, rivets or other suitable attaching means may be used. If unbound heat insulating material is used within my frame structure alone or in combination with other material, another angle piece or other suitable means is attached to the inner sides of the frame strips to support a roof or covering for the unbound material, which may be expanded vermiculite, rock-wool, 85% magnesia, diatomaceous earth or glass-wool. Glass-wool is not suitable for temperatures above 1000 degrees F. The

other materials may be used for higher temperatures. Some block insulation from which I may cut strips for my frame sections are not suitable for temperatures above 600 degrees F. Other block insulation may be used for temperatures up to 1800 degrees F. Aluminum foil may not be used for insulating surfaces above 1000 degrees F. Rigid block insulation made from glass-wool is not suitable for high temperatures since the resin binders soften and loosen the glass filaments.

Fig. 3 is a cross-sectional view of a frame strip indicated by' the numeral 9b and which may or may not have re-enforcing means provided for increasing the modulus of rupture of the strips. As a means for supporting metallic foil within the frame, the foil being a heat insulating means, I imbed staples along the inner sides of parallel frame strips, the staples in parallel lines and not driven in entirely, I next attach thinwires to the staples and string the wires across the frame and attach them to opposite staples.

other suitable means, however, because it save time in the making or the finished product. Very thin metallic foil and more particularly aluminum foil must be carefully handled to avoid damage to the foil. It should be understood the thinner the foil the better is its value as a heat insulator. One factor which makes metallic foil good insulation material is a highly reflective surface and another is its low emissivity rate. It has been found that the elimination of the reflective surface lessens the efficiency of foil by not more than five per cent. It is therefore obvious that the thinnest foil which can be used offers the best value. Foil which may be .0005 of an inch thick may be positioned more quickly in my frame structure with some supporting means than if no such means are provided. The staples in Fig. 3 are indicated by the numerals i4. and the wires by the numeral I5.

Fig. 4 is a cross-sectional view of a frame strip the frame with or without re-enforcing means,

the practical application of which being dependent on the size of the frame. In this design I have devised a simple and practical method of supporting layers of metallic foil within the perimeter of the frame. After the strip is cut from a block or molded, I cut out parallel grooves in a side of the frame strips and the grooves are indicated by the numeral l6. Inorder .to position a layer of foil within the frame within its perimeter and in a groove, I first bend a stiff wire into the form of a frame 20 having the proper dimensions which correspond to the inner width and length of the frame to be processed into an insulation device. Approximately half the size of the depth of the groove I6 is added to each side of the wire frame 20., I next place the wire frame over a layer of foil 22 which may extend on all sides beyond the frame by approximately onequarter inch, and fold the ends of the foil over the wire frame. The wire frame carrying the foil is next inserted in the grooves l6 all the way, in a frame already assembled from three frame strips sections. As many layers of fell as are wanted are so inserted in grooves already cut out and the distance between foil layers is determined by the distance between grooves. It is understood that the polished side of the foil" is positioned to face the surface to be insulated. The fourth section of the frame is next positioned and attached to the other three sections holding the foil layers, the ends of thefoil resting in the grooves of the fourth section or end frame strip. Instead of a frame made of wire for carrying the foil layer, metal strips may be used. If a frame made from wire is large, for example, in excess of. twelve inches, cross-wires or flat metal strips may be used and attached to the opposite wire preferably across the narrow width of the wire frame and spaced apart as may be necessary for making the frame sufficiently rigid for handling. After a wire frame and foil layer is positioned in a groove and in order to make the foil layer air tight, a suitable cement may be packed in the groove along the edges of the first foil layerfrom theunderslde. A suitable cement may be rockwool heat insulating cement.

Figs. 5 to 8 illustrate a frame which may be made of reinforced strips similar to that shown in Fig. 2. The corners of the frame strips may be secured by suitably joining the reinforcingpieces l0 together as indicated at 25 in Fig. 5. The foil element shown in Fig. 8 may be supported on wires as shown at I! in Fig. 3, or upon ledges 43a as shown in Fig. 2 or in the grooves as shown in Fig. 4 at l6.

It is understood that changes may be made without departing from the invention.

I claim: 1

1. A thermal insulating device for application broadside to a surface to be insulated for prevention of heat transmission therefrom, comprising a box frame structure, the sides of said structure being made from fragile strips formed from a light heat insulation containing air cells and of a molded, inherently brittle and friable nature,

said sides extending from said surface, rigid reinforcing strips of a relatively hard and dense heat conducting material extending longitudinally of and substantially coextensive with said fragile strips and secured thereto along substantially the entire length of the fragile strips, said reinforcing strips also extending transversely of said fragile strips for a substantial distance so as to prevent flexing and breakage of said strips and structure, the transverse dimension of said reinforcing strips being less than the same dimension of the fragile strips so as to prevent heat flow directly through said reinforcing strips to the side of said/structure remote from said surface, supporting means on the inner sides of said fragile strips and a heat insulating element extending from side to side of said frame structure and supported by said supporting means, saidelement including a thin sheet of thermal insulative foil and a reinforcing wire frame supported by said supporting means and generally coextensive with said sheet and engaging and supporting the body thereof.

2. The thermal insulating device of claim 1 wherein the supporting means are a plurality of opposed grooves formed in the innersides of said fragile strips and the sheet of thermal insulative foil and wire frame extend into said grooves.

3. A thermal insulating device for application broadside to a surface to be insulated for prevention of heat transmission therefrom, comprising a box frame structure, the sides of said structure being made from fragile strips formed from a light heat insulation containing air cells and of a molded, inherently brittle and friable nature, said sides extending from said surface, a plurality of opposed means on the inner sides of an insulatingelement within said structure and intermediate said surface and the outside of said structure and a heat insulating element extending from side to side of said frame structure and supported upon said means for support by said fragile strips, said element including a thin sheet of thermal insulative foil and a reinforcing frame supported by said supporting means and generally coextensive with said sheet and engaging and supporting the body thereof.

4. The thermal insulating device of claim 3 wherein the opposed means are a plurality of opposed grooves formed in the inner sides of said fragile strips and wherein the reinforcing frame is formed of wire.

5. Thermal insulation for application over a surface to be insulated for prevention of heat transmission therefrom comprising a thin sheet of fragile insulative foil and a supporting, reinforcing frame for said sheet, the said sheet being coextensive with said frame, means retaining said sheet on said frame; the said frame being formed of a stiff, hard, heat conducting material so as to prevent flexing, collapse and damage of said fragile foil; and means for supporting and retaining said sheet in broadside position to said surface and spaced therefrom, said means comprising rigid strips of low thermal conductivity material, said strips extending from said surface and being provided with grooves spaced from said surface and receiving side portions of said frame and sheet.

JAY ROSE.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Kohl et a1 June 28, 1949

Patent Citations
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2791264 *Sep 26, 1955May 7, 1957Kibbey W CousePlastic board and method of making it
US2841203 *Jul 13, 1954Jul 1, 1958Mirror Insulation Company IncThermal insulation
US2993240 *Sep 28, 1956Jul 25, 1961Airson Co IncCeiling tile mounting construction
US3028278 *May 28, 1958Apr 3, 1962Mirror Insulation Company IncThermal insulation
US3106751 *Dec 16, 1955Oct 15, 1963Dow Chemical CoInsulated wall structure
US5265389 *Sep 16, 1991Nov 30, 1993Epcore Panel Systems Inc.Composite building panel
US5280689 *Nov 14, 1991Jan 25, 1994Mill Peter A DComposite cladding panel
DE1185017B *Apr 28, 1960Jan 7, 1965Liquefreeze Company IncAufblasbarer Wandteil
Classifications
U.S. Classification52/404.1, 52/309.4, 52/605, 52/98
International ClassificationE04B1/76, F16L59/00, F22B37/00, F22B37/36
Cooperative ClassificationF22B37/36, E04B1/76, F16L59/00
European ClassificationF16L59/00, E04B1/76, F22B37/36