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Publication numberUS2579242 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 18, 1951
Filing dateMar 10, 1949
Priority dateMar 10, 1949
Publication numberUS 2579242 A, US 2579242A, US-A-2579242, US2579242 A, US2579242A
InventorsPask Stanley J
Original AssigneeStanley J Pask Associates Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Germicidal cabinet
US 2579242 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

S. J. PASK GERMICIDAL CABINET Dec. 18, 1951 4 Sheets-Sheet -l fly, 2

Filed March 10, 1949 v "0 vi nw fl ------l-----l-l-; W 1 flu {TX IQ Z: 1% 1 v H. V V. A j M a a: 0. m 2 3 2 3 1 ii a. w 4r 1 w J #7. I fi INVENTOR. STANLEYJPASK ATTORNEY Dec. 18, 1951 5. J. PASK 2,579,242

GERMICIDAL CABINET Filed March 10, 1949 J 4 Sheets- Sheet 2 INVENTOR. STANLEY J. PASK ms w m ATTORNEY s. J. PASK GERMICIDAL CABINET Dec. 18, 1951 4 SheetsSheet 3 Filed March 10, 19 49 INVENTOR. STANLEY J. PASK ATTORNEY Patented Dec. 18, 1951 GERMICIDAL CABINET Stanley J. Pask, Flushing, N. Y5, assignmto Stanley- J. Pask Associates, vInc;., New York, N. Y., a corporation of New York Application March 10, 1942, Serial No. 80,638 r This invention'relates to a germicidal cabinet and more particularly to such a cabinet for the sterilization of articles of any nature such as medical or dental supplies and tools, nursery equipment or personal household articles, such as toothbrushes, drinking glasses, medicine dis.- pensers, and the like. The invention willfbe illustrated with reference to the sterile storage of toothbrushes, it being understood, however, that this is only by wayof example.

The invention is concerned with a suitable cabinet which employs the sterilizing effect/oi ultraviolet radiation from a suitable source, such as a mercury vapor arc lamp, and means for sup.- porting the objects to be sterilized in proper relation to the lethal radiations from such, source.

As is well understood, airborne micro-organisms of the pathogenic or disease producing type, of which B. coli is a typical representative, are prevalent in the atmosphere and constitute a, menace to health at all times. It is also well recognized that such germs are, rapidly inactivated or destroyed by exposure to ultraviolet radiation between 2000 A. and 2900 A.

It is one of the objects of the present invention to provide a suitable cabinetcontaining a Source of radiant energy in the above-mentioned region, which is particularly suitable for use. in homes, laboratories, nurseries, beauty parlors, barber shops, and the like, and which will have a high germicidal efiectiveness for both. air andliquid or waterborne bacteria.

Another object is to provide such a cabinet which will be economical to produce, convenient to use, pleasing in appearance and readily. installed.

Still another object is to provide'a supporting structure for articles to be sterilized. in a germicidal cabinet which v will be readily accessible for the applying of articles thereto or removal there,- from, and which will. permit such articles; to be subjected to the directlethal radiations;

Germicidal lamps, having a high output. of radiation of wave length 2537 A., are particularly suitablefor the purpose of theT present .invention. Such rays are, however, extremely harmful to, the eyes as well as detrimental to the skin; It.v is, therefore, another object, of the-invention to pro.- vide a cabinet of the above nature-in. which the user will be protected from exposure tothe-germicidal energy.

Other objects and advantages. will hereinafter appear.

In; accordance with the. present, invention I provide; a suitable.- container for: the: object 5' Claims. (01. 250-51) be sterilized, composed of any desired material opaque toradiations in the-region from 2000 A. to 2900 A., such as plastic, metal or wood, although I prefer'to employ aluminum having a polished or oxidized interior surface, since this material provides high-reflective characteristics for ultraviolet radiation in the abiotic' or-sterilizing region. Aluminum, moreover, is light in weight, is. relatively inexpensive, and maybe readily drawn or otherwise formed into the desired shape. An ultraviolet lamp having the required germicidal output, depending upon the physical dimensions of the cabinet, is preferably mounted in the upperportion thereof together with its current limiting and starting. transformer, so as to irradiate the space there beneath. Within this irradiated'spaceI provide one or more racks for the supportof. objects to be sterilized, the racks being actuated by the closing movement of'the cabinet door in such manner as to move inwardly against the side walls of the cabinet, thereby to leavethe central area of the cabinet unobstructed. The racks are oppositely actuated by the opening movement of the door so as. to be advanced toward or through the door openingior more convenient access thereto by the user.

A switch is, also arranged to be actuated by the movement, of the door so, as to complete an energizing circuit for the ultraviolet lamp upon closure of the door and to extinguishthe lamp upon opening of the door, thereby to protectthe eyes of the user when inserting an object into or removing it from the cabinet. A suitable signal indicates whether or. not the lamp is properly functioning when. thed'oor. is. closed. I

The, invention will best be understood" by referenceto the accompanying drawingsin which:

Fig. 1 is a front. view at a germicidal, cabinet embodying the present; invention. with the. cover closed;

Fig. 2 is a vertical sectionofthe cabinet, on the line 22 of Fig. 1;

Fig. 3- is a. detail. view. of. one of the; article support operating, shafts, partly, in. section, on the line 3-3 of Fig. 2;

Fig. 4 is a perspective view. of a. gear. segment provided on the shaftoi'rFig. 3,;

Fig. 5 is a horizontal seetionalview on the line 5-5 of Fig. 2,,withthecover closed;

Fig. 6, is a plan viewer. the=drive-mechanism shown in the upperv partzof Fig. 2, with. the cover 7 removed;

Fig,- '7 a-zvertical sectional-view. on the. line 1-1 of Fig. 6; I

Fig. 8 is a. cross-sectional view on the line 8-8 of Fig. 7;

Fig. 9 is a front view of the cabinet, with the cover open;

Fig. 10 is a horizontal sectional view on the line |l0 of Fig. 9; and

Fig. 11 is a horizontal sectional view taken on the line"! l..l l.of -F ig. .,9. 1

Referringfir'st to Figs; 1, 2 and 9, the germicidal cabinet is shown, by way of example, as comprising a rectangular box, generally indicated at l0, having an open front body portion II and a closure member or door 12. The door I2 is hinged at one side l3 and is provided at 1 the opposite side with a suitable opening handle l4. While any desirable material may be employed, I prefer to fabricate the cabinet of aluminum which may be polished or oxidized on its inner surface to increase the ultraviolet reflection. Such material projides a reflection of rays of wave length 260024; ofabout 60%. However, if desired, other metals such as steel may be employed, but in such case I prefer to chromium plate the inner surface, sinc e chrOm'ium has a reflective index for the germi'cidal rays approaching that o'f'aluminum. v l

A rectangular compartment 15 extends longitudinally across theupper portion of the cabinet and serves to house a current limitingand voltage step uptransformer I5, a lamp socket H and an electrical switch l8. The transformer i6 is supported at one end of a reinforcing plate [9 which extends transversely across the rear wall of the compartment and is secured thereto by screws 2|. Other screws 22 (Fig. 2), passing through the rear wall of the cabinet iii, the rear wall of the compartment l5, and the reinforcing plate l9, serve to support the compartment within the cabinet. A top cover 23is secured to the compartment l5 by suitable screws 24.

The switch (8 is carried by a U-shaped bracket 25,.in turn securedto the opposite end of the plate l9. The lamp socket i1 is supported in an opening disposed centrally in the lower wall of the compartment l5 so that the lamp 2S depends into the upperpor'tion of they cabinet, as best shown in Fig. 9;

The switch is normally biased to the open position and is provided with an operating button Z'Iengageable' by a lever 28, pivoted at 29 in an opening in the bottom leg of the U'-shaped bracket 25. The lever .28 extends upwardly across the button 2! and through an opening 3| in the top cover 23, with the upper end thereof projecting above the compartment [5 in such position as to be engaged by a lever 32, pivoted at 33 to the upper inturned flange of the cabinet door l2. The lever 32 is actuated by the door l2 upon closure thereof to rock the switch operating lever '28 into engagement with the switch button 21, thus to close the switch. Similarly, upon opening of the door I2 the switch I8 is released to its open position by the outward movement of lever 32.

It will be understood that the contacts of the switch'lB'are connected in series with the secondary winding of the transformer I3 and that the terminals of thelamp socket IT. are in circuit with the secondary winding of the transformer. Consequently the lamp' 2B will be energized whenever the door isT'closed-to operate the switch l8 'andwilljbe deenergized when the cover is open. This feature of the construction provides protection for the eyes of the user when opening the cabinet 'tore'move an articletherefrom or insert an article therein. 1

A peephole 34 closed by a suitable glass or crystal is provided in the cabinet door so that the operative or inoperative condition of the lamp 26 may be observed when the door 12 is closed.

A pair of article supporting racks or frames 35 and 36 (Figs. 9 and. 11) are suspended within the cabinet from the lower ends of a pair of spaced vertical shafts 31- and'38. These shafts extend upwardly through the compartment 15, bearing at their lower ends in a sleeve 39 formed by an inward deformation of the bottom wall of the compartment, as shown in Fig. 3. At their upper ends the shafts 31, 38 bear in openings 4! in the compartment cover 23. Each shaft 31, 38 has a groovedcollar 42 at its lower end, externally of the compartment 15, for supporting the racks 35 and 36, respectively, as will more fully appear hereinafter. Each of the shafts is further provided with an annular groove 43, just above the bearing sleeve 39, which serves to receive the radial fingers of a spring retaining spider 44, also engaging with the lip of the bearing flange 39, so as to retain the shaft in position. Each shaft 31, 38 has a slot or keyway 45 at its upper end adapted to receive the inturned key 45 of gear segments 4! and 48, respectively, stamped from sheet, metal, as .will be apparent from an observation of Fig. 4. The teeth 49 of each gear segment are formed in an inclined flange 5|, bent up from the body of the segment.

In assembling the shafts 31 and 38 in the compartment [5,, they are first inserted upwardly through the bearing sleeve 39 and the spring ring 44 is then slipped down over the top thereof and snapped into place. Thereafter the gear segments 41 and 48 are slid down upon their respective shafts with the keys 46 engaging the shaft keyways 45. The top cover serves to hold the gear segments down in position upon their respective shafts. This arrangement, it will be noted, requires no tools to assemble other than a screwdriver for securing the cover 23 in place. The gear segments 41 and 48 are positioned upon the shafts 3'! and 38 in such position as to interengage, so that the shafts may be rotated together in opposite directions. The shaft 3'! constitutes' thedriving shaft and for this purpose it has a lever 52 secured to its upper end, above th e'compartment IS. The lever 52 has a U- shaped end 53 with a key member 54 struck out from the portion intermediate the spaced arms thereof, this key serving to engage the slotor keyway 45 of the shaft 31. The opposite end of the lever 52 is pivoted to'the switch operating lever 32.

The orientation of the lever 52 and gear segments 4'! and 48, in the closed position of the cabinet door I2, is shown in Fig. 5. Upon opening the door [2, lever 52 is rotated, counterclockwise, by the connection of lever 32 to the door [2, until it has rotated through an arc of to bring lever 52 into engagement with a stop 55 depending from the top wall of the cabinet. Lever 52 in rotating rocks the shaft 31, counterclockwise, and through the interengagement of gear segments 41 and 48, drives the shaft 38 clockwise. Consequently, at the end of a door opening operation the'shafts 31 and 38 and gear segments 41 and 48 occupy the position shown in Fig. 6.

Thearticle supportingracks 35 and 36 each comprise a plate or strip 56 (Figs. 9, 10 and 11) having slotted openings 51 therein, arranged in the embodiment shown, for the support of toothbrushesalthough it is tobe understood that these racks may be differently shaped to support other types of articles for germicidal treatment. The slots 59, giving access to the openings 5'7, are defined by the tabs 59 which are alternately bent upwardly and downwardly to form inclined passageways through which the handles of tooth brushes may be passed when similarly inclined. Thereafter, with the brushes suspended vertically in the openings 51, the tabs 59 retain the brushes in position. As shown, the brushes are inserted into the racks with the bristles pointing towards the interior of the cabinet. The reason for this is so that, upon movement of the racks from the forward position shown in Figs. 9 and 11 into the compartment to the position shown in Fig. 2, the bristles of the brushes will be directed toward the ultraviolet source 26.

The plates 56 are supportedfrom a wire frame by curling the opposite end portionsfii thereof about the horizontally extending ends 52 of the frame. The intermediate section of each frame extends vertically, at 63, and thence converges inwardly, to partially encircle the annular recess of the collars 42 provided on the shafts 3? and 38, in resilient engagement therewith, so as to be rotated by the shafts upon opening or closing of the door l2. In the open position of the door, the racks are faced outwardly, as shown in Figs. 9 and 11, so as to be readily accessible for the removal therefrom or the insertion of a toothbrush therein. Upon closing of the door I2 the racks are pivoted into the cabinet against the side walls thereof as shafts 37 and 39 rotate clockwise and counterclockwise, respectively, thus leaving the central portion of the cabinet free from obstruction which would shadow objects placed therein.

For convenience, a removable tray 64 is provided in the base of the cabinet for the support of additional objects to be sterilized, such as gauze, nursery articles, and the like.

The cabinet may be supported from any suitable wall by means of screws engaging in the openings 55 in the rear wall of the cabinet.

Obviously, the invention is not limited to the structural details shown and described nor to the support of any particular objects since various modifications and arrangements may be made to accommodate objects of any form or shape.

What I claim is:

1. A germicidal cabinet having a door opening, a door normally closing said opening and movable to an open position to afford access to the interior of said cabinet, a germicidal lamp within said cabinet, a compartment ithin said cabinet, power control means for said lamp mounted within said compartment, a pair of spaced vertical shafts rotatably mounted in said compartment and extending outwardly through one wall of said compartment, intermeshing gear members carried by each of said shafts within said compartment, an operating lever connected to one of aid shafts, a link interconnecting said lever and said door, and an article support ing rack carried by the outwardly extending end of each of said shafts for movement therewith.

2. A germicidal cabinet having a door opening. a door normally closing said opening and inovable to an open position to afford access to the interior of said cabinet, a germicidal lamp within said cabinet, a compartment within said cabinet, a pair of spaced vertical shafts'rotatably mounted in said compartment and extending outwardly through one wall of said compartment, intermeshing gear members carried by each of said lamp.

3. A germicidal cabinet having a door opening, a door normally closing said opening and movable to an open position to afford access to the interior of said cabinet, a germicidal lamp within said cabinet, a pair of spaced vertical shafts rotatably mounted in said cabinet, intermeshing gear members carried by each of said shafts, an operating lever connected to one of said shafts, a link interconnecting said lever and said door for operation of said shafts upon movement of said door, and an article supporting rack carried by each of said shafts for movement therewith.

4. A germicidal cabinet having a door opening, a door normally closing said opening and movable to an open position to afford access to the interior of said cabinet, a germicidal lamp within said cabinet, a pair of spaced vertical shafts rotatably mounted in said cabinet, intermeshing gear members carried by each of said shafts, an operating lever connected to one of said shafts, a link interconnecting said lever and said door for operation of said shafts upon movement of said door, an article supporting rack carried by each of said shafts for movement therewith, a switch having circuit connections with said lamp and means engageable by said link, in the closed position of said door, for operating said switch whereby to energize said lamp.

5. A germicidal cabinet having a door opening, a door normally closing said opening and movable to an open position to afford access to the interior of said cabinet, a germicidal lamp within said cabinet, a pair of spaced vertical shafts rotatably mounted in said cabinet, interineshing gear members carried by each of said shafts, an operating lever connected to one of said shafts, a link interconnecting said lever and said door for operation of said shafts upon movement of said door, an article supporting rack carried by each of said shafts for movement therewith, a switch having circuit connections with said lamp, means engageable by said link, in the closed position of said door, for operating said switch whereby to energize said lamp, and means for indicating the operative condition of said lamp in the closed position of said door.

STANLEY J. PASK.

nsrennncns CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1566860 *Mar 9, 1925Dec 22, 1925James P HainzigianisToothbrush holder
US1571872 *Jul 27, 1923Feb 2, 1926 Sterilizing- device
US1613655 *Mar 9, 1925Jan 11, 1927Hainzigianis James PToothbrush holder
US1811732 *Oct 31, 1927Jun 23, 1931Pfeifer AlbertCabinet
US2119320 *Jun 23, 1936May 31, 1938Dobrowsky EmmanuelRefrigerator
US2212330 *May 3, 1938Aug 20, 1940Thomas Albert GSterilizing device
US2235296 *May 31, 1939Mar 18, 1941Muncheryan Hrand MElectric sterilizer using radiant energy
US2447183 *Sep 11, 1946Aug 17, 1948Irish Frank LSterilizing apparatus
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3114038 *Jan 19, 1962Dec 10, 1963Meader Malcolm SRoom deodorizer with cup and toothbrush sterilizing means
US3309159 *Nov 12, 1965Mar 14, 1967Scovill Manufacturing CoElectric toothbrush sanitizer and charger
US3954407 *Sep 12, 1974May 4, 1976Andary William AGermicidal lamp
US4803364 *Mar 3, 1987Feb 7, 1989Ritter Charles HToothbrush conditioner
US4888487 *Feb 6, 1989Dec 19, 1989Ritter Charles HToothbrush sterilizer with automatic control
US4950902 *Sep 1, 1989Aug 21, 1990Ritter Charles HToothbrush sterilizer with automatic control and method
US4973847 *Aug 3, 1989Nov 27, 1990Dentec CorporationToothbrush sanitizing device
US8579163 *Nov 3, 2011Nov 12, 2013Charmine ELLISDental rack and dispenser
US20130112713 *Nov 3, 2011May 9, 2013Charmine ELLISDental rack and dispenser
EP2140885A1 *Jun 19, 2009Jan 6, 2010Panasonic Electric Works Co., Ltd.Toothbrush sterilizer
Classifications
U.S. Classification250/455.11, 312/209, 422/24, 312/206, 312/274
International ClassificationA61L2/10
Cooperative ClassificationA61L2/10
European ClassificationA61L2/10