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Publication numberUS2579685 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 25, 1951
Filing dateApr 13, 1949
Priority dateApr 13, 1949
Publication numberUS 2579685 A, US 2579685A, US-A-2579685, US2579685 A, US2579685A
InventorsLoose Theron C
Original AssigneeLoose Theron C
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Pallet stacking device
US 2579685 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Dec. 25, 1951 T, c, LOOSE 2,579,685

, PALLET STACKING DEVICE 2 SPEETS-SHEET 1 Filed April 13. 1949 INVENTOR.

F 1 THE/20V C. LOOSE wmfi ATTORNEYS Dec. 25, 1951 1'. c. LOOSE PALLET STACKING DEV-ICE 2 Sl-IEETS-SHEE 2 Filed April 13. 1949 23 nvvmron. maecw cums/5 va-1;, +02%- Arman/5x5 Patented Dec. 25, 1951 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE 2,579,885 PALLET s'racxmo nlavrcr:

Theron 0. Loose, Elyria, Ohio Application April 13, 1949, Serial No. 87,180 6 Claims. (Cl. 248-120) This invention relates to the art of material handling and storage.

It is an object of this invention to permit palletlng, stacking, and storing of odd lots, oddshaped irregular, crushable, or loose materials so that the materials may be removed from the stack without removing pallets from the stack, and to accomplish this by employing standard pallets that require no modification or adaption for this service. 4

In a preferred embodiment of the invention this is accomplished by providing a plurality of identical novel corner brackets each of which has rigidly secured thereto horizontally-disposed channels or angle irons, to form a rigid square planar structure. Each bracket also receives a vertical post so that'two of the square structures may be joined to form a rigid, open, boxlike framework. The upper and lower surfaces of each square structure lie in planes so that when resting on a pallet a load-bearing area that extends entirely around the pallet is formed. The same considerations apply to a pallet that rests upon the upper part of the box-like structure. It is an important feature of the invention that each novel comer bracket has a pair of mutually perpendicular guide or locating flanges that engage the comer edges of the pallet to align and position the box-like structures and the pallets.

A stacked load made up in accordance with the invention is extremely rigid and stable without need for angle braces, because the load is transmitted directly between the box-like framework structures by the pallets themselves. so that with regard to considerations of stability the stacked load compares favorably to a stack of solid blocks can be assembled by the user into stacking framework structures that embody the aforesaid objects and advantages, the assembly and fitting consisting primarily of simple sawing and drilling operations performed on commercial or stock structural members, such an angle irons, pipes, and the like. This saves shipping costs in that onlythe brackets need be specially manufactured, the structural members are usually commercial items that may be purchased locally, the results being that the entire assembly has relatively low cost.

Another object is to provide for storing units in small space, which is readily accomplished by removal of the posts, leaving the planar structures assembled for efficient storage.

The manner in which these and other objects and advantages may be attained will be apparent pinned (as by the corner flanges) against lateral shifting. This is the ultimate in stable stacking where the pallets and stacking structures are entirely free, e. g. not joined or bolted together.

Other objects are to provide for the use of any size pallets; to utilize space most effectively for loads of varying heights; and, to permit use of the pallets in connection with other material handling operations when not being used in connection with applicant's novel stacking apparatus. These objects are accomplished by merely selecting the proper length for the horizontal spacing members to fit the pallets at hand, and the framework can be adjusted to suit the height of the various or selected loads by selecting proper lengths for the vertical posts, which in the preferred form of the invention are merely lengths of heavy pipe.

It is another object of the invention to provide, as articles of manufacture, corner brackets which from the following detailed description of a preferred embodiment of the invention.

In the drawings:

Fig. 1 is a perspective view of a stack of pallets and box-like framework members formed in accordance with this invention;

Fig. 2 is an isometric view of one corner section of a box-like stacking assembly; and,

Fig. 3 is a horizontal section through one of the corner assemblies.

Fig. 1 illustrates a typical application of the invention, although it by no means indicates the range and adaptability of applicants stacking device. By way of illustration, in Fig. 1 are shown three of applicant's assembled, box-like framework structures A, A1, and A2. It can be seen that all elements are supported by the lower pallet P, the upper two elements by the intermediate pallet P1, whereas the upper structure A:

rests on the upper pallet P2. The pallets are of standard construction and, except for the fact that with a given stack assembly all pallets must be of the same size, the invention may be applied for use with any size of pallet.

Each of the box-like structures to which the invention relates includes eight corner brackets C, which are connected by vertical and horizontal structural members as will be presently described, to form a rigid box-like framework. Individual frame-work structures may be made of any height and may also be further modified according to the nature of the material to be stored, therein. For example, the lower box structure A may be formed with side walls "I for the storage of fine or loose material. Another box member A1 for. example may have side walls ll of expanded metal and an access plank l2 for storing bulk material of intermediate sizes. If desired.

asvaoas no side walls need be included as indicated in connection with the upper assembly A2. when the pallets and box-like members are stacked, access may be had without unstacking or manipulating the pallets and the load.

The manner whereby an extremely rigid stack or assembly of elements is obtained will be more apparent from the detailed description of the construction of a preferred form of the invention shown in Figs. 2 and 3. Each corner bracket includes a central rectangular or block-like body portion 20 having co-planar, perpendicular extendinglugs 2i integral with the body. The lugs are transversely bored as at 22 to provide for detachment of angle irons 23 by means of bolts or other fasteners 24. when four of the corner elements and four angle irons 22 are assembled, a rectangular planar section is formed which is virtually as rigid as if all the parts were integral. It is noted that the lugs 2i may be beveled as at 26 to provide clearance for the radius usually found in rolled shapes such as angle irons. In order to positively lock the stacking device so as to prevent lateral shifting. a pair of mutually-perpendicular vertical flanges 21 extend from the body of the bracket which. as seen in Fig. 1. engage the side corners of the pallets.

It is a feature of the invention that large load-bearing surfaces are provided between each framework structure and the associated pallets. This can be readily understood from the upper portion of Fig. 2 wherein a surface 28 of the body portion 20 of the with the surfaces 29 of the angle irons around the entire pallet. the surface 28 is in reality not relied upon because the surfacesjs provide adequate bearing area. This has the advantage that the corners of the pallets, which are the most subject to damage and deformation, are not depended upon as load supporting and aligning membern However. in the preferred construction lugs 2| are offset so as to cause surfaces 28 and 29 to be co-planar.

In order to complete each box-like stacking assembly, four vertical posts must be rigidly mounted between the corner brackets. In the preferred construction this is accomplished by providing a vertical socket 3| in the body portion 20 of each bracket which sockets receive suitable lengths of pipe 32 rigidly clamped by means of one or more set screws 33. I have found in practice that an assembly made in accordance with the preferred embodiment is virtually as rigid as if it were welded together to form a unitary structu'e.

The corner brackets C may be manufactured and shipped separately to the user whereupon the latter then cuts'angle irons 23 to length, dependin upon the size pallets he has available. He cuts a length of pipe 32 to length depending upon the height of the load to be stacked. The only other operation required is a drilling operation in the angle irons to receive the bolts 24 whereupon the entire framework may be assembled, and with the bolts and set screws ti htened the structure is completely rigid. Of course, the entire set or sets of component parts may also be sold or shipped, preferably in knock-down form.

The framework units may be placed on the pallets before or after the load is transferred to the pallets. of course. if side retaining memto the material in any tier,

corner casting cooperates bers are fitted to the box structure, the pallet will not be loaded until after it has received the bly extremely rigid. There are no lengthly posts depending upon hinged Joints nor upon column or beam action for rigidity. The unit will, in effect. be a series of rigid boxes pinned together which is the ultimate in rigidity short of having the entire assembly made of one piece.

It is a feature of the invention that no modiflcation of the pallets is required so that they may be used for other purposes than in conjunction with applicant's novel stacking structure. It is noted that for purposes of storing the stacking structures in a minimum space the vertical posts may be readily removed by loosening the set screws, whereupon the parts occupy very little space and can be quickly assembled.

The corner brackets C may be made of economical sand castings, and since the lateral and vertical structural members extending between the brackets are commercial items readily obtainable throughout the country, the user can assemble custom-made stacking units and need only purchase the corner castings from the manufacturer.

Although the lug construction mounting and the angle irons 23 and the socket mounting for vertical posts 22 are the preferred form of attaching means, it will be understood that in the broader aspects of the invention other means for rigidly mounting these parts may be employed without departing from the mode of operation of the invention. Similarly, the horizontal members such as the angle irons 23 in the preferred embodiment may be made of other structural shapes as may the vertical posts 22, strength, rigidity, and economy being the prime requirements.

Those skilled'in the art will recognize that these and other modifications of the invention may be made without departing from the scope of the invention as defined in the appended claims.

What I claim is:

1. A device for stacking pallets comprising a rigid box-like framework formed of upper and lower rectangular sections, unitary vertical posts rigidly joining the corners of said sections, both the lower portion of the lower section and the upper portion of the upper section forming planar surfaces for engaging a standard pallet in loadbearing relation thereto, and a pair of mutually perpendicularly vertical flanges at each corner of said framework for engaging the side corners of the pallets. 4

2. A device for stackin pallets comprising a rigid box-like framework formed of upper and lower rectangular sections, each section comprising corner brackets having mutually P rp ndicular horizontally projecting lugs, angle irons attached to said lugs, unitary vertical posts rigidly joining the corner brackets of said sections, said angle irons being arranged so that the lower portion of the lower section and the upper portion of the upper section form planar surfaces for enagin a standard allet in load-bearing relation thereto, and a pair of mutually perpendicularly vertical flanges extending from each corner bracket for engaging the side corners of the pallets. I

3. A device for stacking pallets comprising a rigid box-like framework formed of upper and lower rectangular sections, each section comprising corner brackets and angle irons joining said brackets, vertical sockets in said corner brackets with the sockets of one section facing those of the other section, unitary vertical posts in said sockets joining the corner brackets of saidsections, said angle irons being arranged so. that the lower portion of the lower section and the upper portion of the upper section form planar surfaces for engaging a standard allet in loadbearing relation thereto, and a' pair of mutually perpendicularly vertical flanges extending from each corner bracket for engaging the side corners of the pallets.

4. As an article of manufacture, a corner bracket for assemblage with a box-like framework for stacking pallets comprising a body portion having upper and lower generally parallel flat faces, one of said faces being formed for disposal over the corner of a standard pallet, mutually perpendicular flanges extending vertically from said body portion at the outer edges of said one face for engaging the side corners of the pallet, mutually perpendicular horizontally disposed attaching lug means formed on said body portion for attachment to elongated structural members, said attaching means being parallel to and vertically spaced from said flanges, and vertically disposed attaching means formed intersecting the other of said faces on said body portion for rigidly receiving a vertical post.

5. As an article of manufacture, a corner bracket for assemblage with-a box-like framework for stacking pallets comprising a body portion having upper and lower generally parallel flat faces, one of said faces being formed for disposal over the corner of a standard pallet,

6 mutually perpendicular flanges extending vertically from said body portion for engaging the side corners of the pallet. mutually perpendicular horizontally disposed lugs projecting from said body portion for attachment to elongated struc tural members, said lugs being parallel to and vertically spaced from said flanges, a vertically disposed socket extending vertically into said body portion from the other of said faces for receiving a vertical post, and set screw means in said body portion for clamping a post in said socket.

6. As an article of manufacture. a corner.

bracket for assemblage with a box-like framework for stacking pallets comprising a rectangular body portion having a horizontal surface for engaging the corner of astandard pallet, mutually perpendicular flanges extending vertically from two sides of said body portion for engaging the side corners of the pallet, mutually perpendicular horizontally disposed co-planar lugs formed on said body portion for attachment to elongated structural members, said lugs being parallel to and vertically spaced from said flanges, and a vertically disposed socket means formed in said rectangular body portion for receiving a vertical post, said socket being perpendicular to the plane of said lugs and opening away from said flanges.

' THERON C. LOOSE.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 564,740 Dietz July 28, 1896 697,237 Collins Apr. 8, 1902 1,010,801 Rapp Dec. 5, 1911 2,495,711 Fletcher Jan. 31, 1950 2,497,453 Hazen Feb. 14, 1950 2,498,414 Gondar Feb. 21, 1950

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2673700 *Oct 22, 1951Mar 30, 1954Daniel A EberhardtPallet
US2676776 *Dec 2, 1952Apr 27, 1954Jr William D TownsonSectional storage rack and pallets therefor
US2678787 *Jun 1, 1950May 18, 1954Union Steel Prod CoMaterial handling pallet
US2700520 *Apr 21, 1951Jan 25, 1955Skubic Leroy FSpacing and supporting facilities for pallets and the like
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Classifications
U.S. Classification108/53.5, 248/220.1, 108/55.1, 410/78, 206/512, 248/214, 206/386, 248/219.2, 217/43.00A
International ClassificationB65D19/38
Cooperative ClassificationB65D19/385
European ClassificationB65D19/38B