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Publication numberUS2581301 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 1, 1952
Filing dateJul 20, 1948
Priority dateJul 20, 1948
Publication numberUS 2581301 A, US 2581301A, US-A-2581301, US2581301 A, US2581301A
InventorsLawrence G Saywell
Original AssigneeSaywell Associates
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Antifriction composition
US 2581301 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Patented Jan. 1, 1952 UNITED STATES ATNT OFFICE ANTIFRIC'IION CUE/{POSITION Calif., a joint venture No Drawing. Application July 20,1948, Serial No. 39,822

'5 Claims.

This invention relates generally to composi tions capable of providing bearing surfaces of low friction characteristics.

In the past various types of metals, alloys and compositions have been provided in an efiort to provide bearing surfaces of low. friction characteristics. Babbitt metal, which is an alloy containing tin, lead, copper and zinc, is one of the most common bearing alloys employed. It has many recognized limitations, including in particular its dependence upon oil lubrication, and the fact that it must be cast or machined to the form desired. Some antifriction bearing compo sitions are being made by powdered metallurgy technique, involving compressing metal powder followed by a sintering operation to secure a bond. This technique is relatively costly, and when metals such as lead and tin are introduced into such a composition, the sintering operation forms an alloy between them, so that they do not appear as individual ingredients in the final composition.

It is an object of the present invention to provide a new type of antifriction composition which has advantageous characteristics not possessed by other compositions now available.

Another object of the invention is to provide a composition of the above character in which metal ingredients, such as lead, zinc or tin, may be provided in the composition without forming an alloy between them, thus imparting desirable characteristics to the product.

Another object of the invention is to pro'vide a composition of the above character "which is adaptable for use in different ways, including the forming of bodies of considerable size, or its application as a relatively thin coating.

Additional objects of the-invention will appear from the following description in which the preferred embodiments'have been set forth in detail.

My composition consists of a number of divided solid ingredients, including graphite, and one or more divided metals, which are bonded together in a homogeneous mass by a thermally set synthetic resin. As will be presently explained such a composition can be provided in liquid form with a solvent, to form a coating, or it can be formed in masses of considerable size to the dimensions desired.

Assuming use of more than one metal in the composition, which is desirable, these metals remain as such in the final homogeneous composition, and are not sintered or alloyed together. Thus for example superior bearing characteristics can be obtained by the use of both lead and 2 tin, whereas in conventional compositions or'al loys it isimpossible to have these ingredients separately present.

The following is an example of a formula which can be used according to the present invention:

5 grams phenolformaldehyde resin in the form of a powder 0.4 gram flaked graphite 1;? grams lead in flaked form having a particle size of 320 mesh 1.7 gramscopper in flaked form and having a particle size of 320 mesh.

The above ingredients are homogeneously mixed together and may be molded under pressure and heat according to known plastic molding procedure, to form masses of the desired shape. Heat treatment is applied during or after molding to thermally set the resin, thus providing a body of considerable mechanical strength, which can be trimmed or shaped by known finishing methods, such as grinding.

A composition made as described above will aiford advantageous friction characteristics when used for example as a bearing for a rotating shaft. The graphite provides a dry lubricant, thus permitting the use of a minimum amount of oil on the bearing, or even permitting the bearing to operate dry with a minimum amount of injury and friction. The flaked lead provides a low melting point material which imparts favorable friction characteristics. In addition the presence of this metal, together with other metals such as copper, serves to impart relatively good heat conductivity to facilitate conduction of heat away from the friction surfaces.

In the above formula reference is made to the use of divided metals in flaked form. The flaked form of metal has been found to be superior to ordinary powdered metals, presumably because of the greater area which a flaked particle may present to the bearing area.

According to my observations, the thermally set resin forms a bonding material which provides the desired strength for the mass, and which more or less separates all of the particles from direct physical engagement with each other. It appears that the particles of graphite and metal, at the bearing surface, are exposed to forma part of the bearing area, although these particles are bonded by the synthetic resin and thus retained in place.

The use of finely divided flaked tin is likewise desirable in the composition such as described above. Thus a composition can be used containing lead, copper and tin, and having a formula as follows:

5 grams phenolformaldehyde resin in powdered form 0.4 grams flaked graphite 0.8 grams finely divided flaked lead 0.8 grams finely divided flaked copper 1.7 grams finely divided flaked tin.

In the last mentioned composition both the lead and tin have low melting points, and as is well known, these ingredients readily alloy to gether. In my composition however they retain their individual melting points and characteristics, thus imparting novel and desirable properties to the composition. Particularly with such a composition there are two materials of low melting point, whereby under conditions of rising temperature there is first a lubricating action due to thermal plasticity of the tin, and thereafter if the temperature further rises the lead becomes plastic. Thus lubricating action due to thermal plasticity of the metal particles is extended over a relatively wide temperature range, as distinguished from a very limited temperature range provided by other compositions and alloys.

I have also discovered that powdered silicon is a desirable ingredient to add to my composition. Use of this ingredient appears to decrease the coefiicient of friction, and to increase its resistance to wear. In general this ingredient can be added to the extent of say 5 to (by weight) of the remaining ingredients of the composition. Thus for the first mentioned formula I may add from 0.2 to 0.3 gram of powdered silicon, together with the resin, graphite, lead and copper. The second mentioned formula can be similarly modified.

In addition to its use to form bodies of considerable size, a composition such as described above can be applied to form relatively thin coatings on metal. Thus either of the two formulas specified above can be mixed with a suitable solvent, such as a mixture of ethyl, isopropyl and butyl alcohols, which dissolves the resin content, and which will provide a fluid mixture which can be sprayed, brushed on, or applied by dipping. After applying one or more coats, followed by air drying, such a coating'is cured by heating the same in a suitable oven to a temperature of the order of 300 F. or higher, to thermally set the resin. A composition of this type can be used to advantage to coat thin metal annuluses in sealing assemblies of the type disclosed in my Patent No.

2,428,041, in order to provide favorable wear and friction characteristics and as disclosed and claimed in my co-pending application, Serial No. 105,479, flied July 19, 1949. Likewise such a material can be applied to build up or repair worn bearing surfaces,

I claim:

1. A composition serving to provide a low friction bearing surface comprising essentially a thermally set synthetic resin having dispersed therein finely divided solids in flake form serving to reduce the surface friction characteristics of the composition, the solids including flaked copper, flaked lead, flaked tin and flaked graphite, the resin being the major constituent and the copper and lead being present in substantially equal proportions, the divided solids being substantially separated from direct physical engagement by the resin.

2. A composition serving to provide a low friction bearing surface comprising essentially a thermally set phenolformaldehyde resin having dispersed therein finely divided solids in flake form serving to reduce the surface friction characteristics of the composition, the solids including flaked graphite, flaked lead, and flaked copper, the proportions corresponding substantially to 5 grams of resin, 0.4 gram of flaked graphite, 1.7 grams of lead, and 1.7 grams of copper.

3. A composition serving to provide a low friction bearing surface comprising essentially a thermally set phenolformaldehyde resin having dispersed therein finely divided solids in flake form serving to reduce the surface friction characteristics of the composition, the solids comprising flaked graphite, flaked lead, flaked copper, and flaked tin, the proportions of the ingredients corresponding substantially to 5 grams of resin, 0.4 grams of flaked graphite, 0.8 gram of flaked lead, 0.8 gram of flaked copper, and 1.7 grams of flaked tin.

4. A composition serving to provide a low friction bearing surface comprising essentially a thermally set synthetic resin having dispersed therein finely divided solids serving to reduce the surface friction characteristics of the composition, the solids including flaked graphite, flaked copper, and flaked lead, the resin being the major constituent and the copper and lead being present in substantially equal proportions, the divided solids being substantially separated from direct physical engagement by the resin.

5. A composition as defined in claim 4 including a minor proportion of powdered silicon.

LAWRENCE G. SAYWELL.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the I file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 1,969,041 Seabury et al. Aug. 7, 1934 2,159,935 Sanders May 23, 1939 2,326,000 Teeple Aug. 3, 1943 2,416,480 Henry et a1 Feb. 25, 1947

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1969041 *May 29, 1930Aug 7, 1934Gen Motors CorpBrake lining composition
US2159935 *Aug 25, 1936May 23, 1939Stackpole Carbon CoBrake lining
US2326000 *Apr 27, 1942Aug 3, 1943Crane Packing CoBearing material
US2416480 *Aug 19, 1943Feb 25, 1947Henrite Products CorpElectrical brush
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2725321 *Apr 13, 1953Nov 29, 1955Westinghouse Electric CorpLaminated article containing resinous impregnation composition
US2757109 *Nov 13, 1952Jul 31, 1956Westinghouse Electric CorpBearing composition, bearing, and method of making same
US2758421 *Apr 3, 1952Aug 14, 1956Owens Illinois Glass CoChute for conveying molten glass
US2865692 *Oct 26, 1955Dec 23, 1958Richard GossmannCompound bearing with synthetic resin layers
US2956848 *Feb 3, 1958Oct 18, 1960Koppers Co IncBearing member
US2989352 *Sep 11, 1958Jun 20, 1961Kearney & Trecker CorpBearing structure
US2992137 *Oct 26, 1955Jul 11, 1961Hohenzollern HuettenverwaltComposite bearing
US3025638 *Feb 25, 1959Mar 20, 1962Owens Illinois Glass CoHandling of hot glass
US3051586 *Jan 27, 1958Aug 28, 1962Electrofilm IncSolid lubricant film resistant to corrosion
US3079338 *Jan 26, 1959Feb 26, 1963Caubet Jacques JeanAnti-friction material
US3108370 *Nov 16, 1959Oct 29, 1963Federal Mogul Bower BearingsMethod of producing a face seal
US3234128 *Jan 9, 1961Feb 8, 1966Glacier Co LtdPlain bearings
US3264215 *Jul 18, 1963Aug 2, 1966Illinois Railway Equipment CoAnnular disc lubricant
US3328100 *Mar 17, 1964Jun 27, 1967Abex CorpBearings
US3409549 *Oct 22, 1965Nov 5, 1968Freeman Michael WalterCompositions and articles including non-pyrophoric microparticles
US3455864 *Feb 24, 1964Jul 15, 1969Gerald E DodsonBearing
US3467596 *Jan 26, 1967Sep 16, 1969Ind Des Coussinets SocAntifriction compositions and method of applying the same on a substrate
US3844954 *Jul 28, 1972Oct 29, 1974A FestaAntifriction material
US4329238 *Jul 30, 1979May 11, 1982Mitrofanova Alla KLubricant containing epoxy resin and polyethylenepolyamine as curable components
US5286393 *Apr 15, 1992Feb 15, 1994Jet-Lube, Inc.Coating and bonding composition
US5348668 *Nov 23, 1993Sep 20, 1994Jet-Lube, Inc.Coating and bonding composition
US5498351 *May 12, 1994Mar 12, 1996Loctite CorporationMetal wires by drawing with lubricants
US5536422 *May 1, 1995Jul 16, 1996Jet-Lube, Inc.Anti-seize thread compound
US5547503 *Nov 23, 1993Aug 20, 1996Oldiges; Donald A.Coating and bonding composition
US6620460 *May 31, 2002Sep 16, 2003Jet-Lube, Inc.Adhering an anti-seize metallic film onto the surface of threads and coating the anti-seize protected threads with an environmentally friendly lubricating composition
US7666469 *Jun 20, 2008Feb 23, 2010Superior Graphite Co.Gavel-pack sand, granular betonite, ground Gilsonite, calcium carbonate, glass beads, rock wool, shredded paper, metal spheres, ceramic beads, nut hulls, ground rubber, plastic beads, muscovite mica, calcined petroleum coke or perlite having impregnated graphite; especiallly oil field particulates
DE1170219B *Nov 24, 1959May 14, 1964Carl Clarus FaWeichmetallpaste zur Verminderung des Ver-schleisses bei Einrichtungen des Bergbaues
DE1283534B *Jun 20, 1961Feb 20, 1969Glacier Co LtdGleitlager und Gleitlagermaterial
EP1858694A2 *Feb 24, 2006Nov 28, 2007Superior Graphite Co.Graphite coating of particulate materials
Classifications
U.S. Classification508/105, 277/944, 277/941, 524/440, 524/496, 277/936
International ClassificationC08J5/16, F16C33/04, F16C33/20
Cooperative ClassificationY10S277/941, Y10S277/936, F16C33/201, Y10S277/944
European ClassificationF16C33/20B