Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS2581864 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 8, 1952
Filing dateNov 28, 1950
Priority dateNov 28, 1950
Publication numberUS 2581864 A, US 2581864A, US-A-2581864, US2581864 A, US2581864A
InventorsJr Alfred M Kaufmann
Original AssigneeJr Alfred M Kaufmann
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Arch support
US 2581864 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

A. M. KAUFMANN, JR

'. ARCH SUPPORT Filed Nov. 28, 1950 ATTORNEY Jan. 8, 1952 b 5 m 8 Tl l N w m m V w l. 3. Q s A i 1 1.

Patented Jan. 8, 1952 ARCH SUPPORT Alfred M. Kaufmann, Jr., Newark, N. J.

Application November 28 4 Claims.

This invention relates to what are generally classified as arch supports. More particularly, the invention deals with devices of this, kind adapted to be worn inside footwear for the support of the foot, as well as in the provision of what is known as a bunion shield. Stillmore particularly, the invention deals with devices of the character described, wherein the arch or metatarsal portion of the device includes a pocket, into which a suitable padding is adapted to be inserted to provide the desired metatarsal structure to suit the user of the device.

The novel features of the invention will be best understood from the following description, when taken together with the accompanying drawing, in which certain embodiments of the invention are disclosed and, in which, the separate parts are designated by suitable reference characters in each of the views, in which:

Fig. 1 is a plan view of an arch support made according to my invention.

Fig. 2 is a section on the line 2-2 of Fig. 1.

Fig. 3 is a section on the line 33 of Fig. 2, omitting the background showing and illustrating a pad, not shown in Fig. 2.

Fig. 4 is a view similar to Fig. 3 taken on the line 44 of Fig. 2; and

Fig. 5 are detailed sectional views showing modified forms of perforating, the sectional views being on an enlarged scale.

In the drawing, I have shown at Ill an arch supporting device, comprising a sole portion II, a heel portion l2, a curved arch or metatarsal portion I3 and a side bunion shield l4 having an extension l5 at one side of the heel portion.

The arch or metatarsal portion l3 has a relatively large pocket l6 formed therein which ex tends to the rear portion of the sole ll. pocket [6 has an opening, as at H, at the rear portion thereof and the pocket occupies a greater portion of the width of the metatarsal portion of the device.

The heel portion I2 is recessed on its lower sur face, as at I8, which leaves a boundary wall [9 extending around the sides and rear part of the heel portion, the recess l8 tapering into the metatarsal portion, as indicated at l9 in Fig. 2. This recessed heel provides what I term a hammock cushion seat for the heel which allows the central partion of the heel of the foot to extend downwardly, while maintaining the sides of the heel firmly supported by the wall IS.

The entire device is provided with perforations 20 spaced on all parts thereof, except the pocket portion l6 and recess part l8 of the heel. This The- , 1950, Serial No. 197,918

construction provides ventilation and, further, increases the flexible characteristics of the material.

In Fig. 5 of the drawing, I have shown at ma, lllb, and lllc three modified forms of wall structure, which may be incorporated in the arch support. These wall structures differ from that shown in Figs. 1 to 4, inclusive, in that the apertures, such as the apertures 20, instead of extending completely through the device, extend only partially through the wall structure. The wall structure [0a has apertures 2| which open through the bottom therof. The wall structure lOb has apertures 22 opening through the top thereof; whereas, the wall structure lllc has apertures 23 opening through the top wall and apertures 24 opening through the bottom wall, these apertures being divided by a partition 25.

In Fig. 2 of the drawing, the pocket 'I 6 is shown blank or, in other words, without a pad therein; whereas, in Fig. 3, a pad I6 is shown arranged in the pocket I6, the pad being of a predetermined thickness to suit the user of the arch support. In this connection, it will be understood that pads of varying thicknesses can be employed to control the build-up of the metatarsal portion of the device.

I My improved arch support is preferably moulded from suitable mouldable materials, preferably a plastic material, which has the characteristic of maintaining a moulded shape, but of the consistency of rubber which facilitates fiexure of the device in the use thereof and to the end of opening the pocket "5 for insertion of the pad l6. Vinylite resins are suitable for this purpose and ithas been found that plastic materials of this type and kind are non-toxic and completely sanitary, keeping in mind that the same may be washed or cleaned from time to time. By reason of the flexibility of the material, it will be apparent that the support will adapt itself to the contour of the foot and provide the comfort as well as firm support of the foot in the shoe.

Having fully described my invention, what I claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent is:

1. An arch support of the character described, comprising a unitary plastic body comprising a sole, heel and intermediate metatarsal portions, the metatarsal portion of the support having a pocket disposed between upper and lower surfaces of said unitary body, said pocket having an opening through one wall of the support for insertion of a pad in said pocket, and the support having, throughout the major portion of the area thereof, perforations opening through at least one surface thereof.

2. An arch support of the character described, comprising a unitary plastic body comprising a sole, heel and intermediate metatarsal portions, the metatarsal portion of the support having a pocket disposed between upper and lower surfaces of said unitary body, said pocket having an opening through one wall of the support for 111- sertion of a pad in said pocket, the support having, throughout the major portion of the area thereof, perforations opening through at least one surface thereof, and the heel portion of the support having a recess on the lower surface thereof bounded by side and rear Walls.

3. An arch support of the character described,

comprising a unitary plastic body comprising a 4. A foot supporting device of the character described, comprising a unitary body of flexible plastic material, said body having sole and heel portions joined and vertically offset by an intermediary metatarsal portion, said metatarsal portion having a pocket arranged between upper and lower surfaces and opening through one surface of said body, the opening being disposed adjacent the heel portion, the pocket being adapted to receive a pad'in providing a metatarsal support, said heel end portion being hollowed-out to provide a cushioned seat, and said body having apertures therein opening through at least onesurface of said body.

ALFRED M. KAUFMANN, JR.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the fire of this patent:

UNITED STATES. PATENTS

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1304836 *Sep 30, 1918May 27, 1919Splitdore Electrical companyIgnition system
US1701804 *Jan 27, 1926Feb 12, 1929 Heel and aech support
US2213770 *Jun 20, 1938Sep 3, 1940Sajdak JosephArch support
US2247114 *Oct 24, 1938Jun 24, 1941Walk Easy Foot Rest Mfg CompanCushion insole
US2366323 *May 15, 1943Jan 2, 1945Zoltan FriedArch support
US2401514 *Dec 19, 1941Jun 4, 1946William M SchollPlastic arch support
US2409960 *Apr 10, 1944Oct 22, 1946William M SchollArch support
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2888016 *Apr 4, 1956May 26, 1959De Lamater Georgia KTherapeutic boot
US3093130 *Sep 11, 1959Jun 11, 1963James Cotton LeeFoot appliances
US3205595 *Apr 21, 1964Sep 14, 1965Funck Kg Dr IngVentilated water-tight footwear
US3990159 *Aug 1, 1975Nov 9, 1976Borgeas Alexander TTherapeutic personalizable health shoe
US4070770 *Feb 15, 1977Jan 31, 1978Red Wing Shoe Company, Inc.Insole for rock climbing shoe
US5129395 *Jan 25, 1991Jul 14, 1992Hoffmann John AShoe interior
US5799413 *May 8, 1997Sep 1, 1998Argyris; ArtInnersole for a shoe and method of making the same
US5896678 *Mar 20, 1998Apr 27, 1999Totes Isotoner CorporationResilient sandal wedge and sandal formed therewith
US5951935 *Aug 27, 1997Sep 14, 1999Converse Inc.Method for making sock liner having resilient pads therein
EP0350517A1 *Jul 12, 1988Jan 17, 1990KLEYLEIN, HorstOrthopedic insert for shoes, particularly for sports shoes
Classifications
U.S. Classification36/147, 36/3.00B, 36/DIG.200, 36/43, D24/192
International ClassificationA43B7/18, A43B7/14, A43B17/16
Cooperative ClassificationA43B7/18, A43B7/1495, A43B7/142, Y10S36/02, A43B17/16, A43B7/14
European ClassificationA43B7/14A20A, A43B7/18, A43B7/14C, A43B17/16, A43B7/14