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Publication numberUS2582066 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 8, 1952
Filing dateJan 24, 1947
Priority dateJan 24, 1947
Publication numberUS 2582066 A, US 2582066A, US-A-2582066, US2582066 A, US2582066A
InventorsMarc Resek
Original AssigneePerfection Stove Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Wall-mounted combustion space heater with window-accommodated air duct and flue
US 2582066 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

.QESEKI WALL-MOUNTED COMBUSTION SPACE HEATER WITH Jap. 8, 1952 .WINDOW-ACCOMMODATED AIR DUCT AND FLUE 2 SHEETS-SHEET l Filed Jan. 24, 1947 MMM Jan. 8, 1952 M. RESEK WALL-MOUNTED COMBUSTION4 SPACE HEATER WITH WINDOW-ACCOMMODATED AIR DUCT AND FLUE 2y SHEETS- SHEET 2 Filed Jan. 24. 1947 lluvVENToR. NaIwQe/c jim M M ATTI/L51.;

Patented Jan. 8, 1952 @s PATENT uviolin-tice fIDATED AIRDUCT AND f-FLUE rv'llllarc...Resch Cleveland H'eiehts,- {15h-io, l.asshignor I'to Perfection Stove Ccm'panyf Cleveland, Ohio,

a .corporationiofhio .This..invention,,generally;is in thaclass f vstationary space. heaters and. itx consists-of .a3 heater which "flue and duct are arranged toproje'ct 'out l'throughthe Window betweena. part 'ofthe' 'window frame and sash, preferably I"between v'the "window .sill and the bottom of the lower sash, thereby'to uminimizrathe itrouble "and `expense nof installation, and to avoid the necessity for making a flue open- 'ngfliniftheiwallfofthebuilding.

A further'fobjeotfof l"the iinvertionvi's to enclose flue within fthe duetin spaeed2relationtofthe 'walls thereof so las .to .-'insulalte the .surrounding wind-ow parts :from @the heat fof the l'prddu'ets -Mof combustion.

.-.Other objects farcito provide a :space heater fof the :aforesaid character tth'atiiis highly eiicient; that is rsimple 'and :relatively inexpensive .fof construction; vthat is neat fand :attractive :in appearance-and wherein 'theftop of the ihousing isiinsu- .latedzandlprovidesva ledge l in Efront :of the `window.; wherein :the .aforesaid duct :is @shaped y'to fembraoe the .window .ledge so :that 'it aaids rin 2holding :the

- Vheaterin vproper rela-tion fto the -wall .and :so .that

theisash interilts with the top of-.the'ductin such manneras to effectively close the :jointfbetween the sash and .duct,vand=to.prov:ide `afl'xeater of lthe .character above set forth which is ythoroughly safe from the standpoints -iof fire .hazard T:and asphyxiation, and wherein the -draft is Anot fad- Versely .affected Yby .changes in :air pressure and by .the winds.

.A further object is to A.provide ,a construction that readily lends itself to 'forced draft circulation and in which the incorporation `of l.air i-mpeiling means for .such ,purpose is convenient r'and optional.

In vthe accompanying drawing, wherein like reference characters designate'like parts 'in the two Views, Fig. l represents a front elevation, partly in section, of a spaceheater embodying my invention and showing the same mounted on the wall of a building in association with a window.; Fig. is a vertical section through the .heater and adjacent portions oi the Wall and window with the burner and air impelling means shown in elevation; Fig. 3 is ahorizontal section onthe Iline 3-3 of Fig. 2, and Fig. 4 is a fragmentary perspective View of the heater.

.2 l'Ifhe heateri includes-ral housingdesignatedjgenorally,bythe reference'numerald. "This housing has5 axduets2-that-extends from its rear'fside ad- .jacentthe top-thereof. -Aninterior ,structure or casing, generally-1designfated 3 lhas al Aflue 4 that proj ects i rearwardly from .its upper `end Lthrough Iand-beyond the duct 2. The housing Ifis confstructed of sheet metatand ,comprises affront wall f|0,arear Wall Il, end-walls y l2-fami l, and va double, insulated top wall l5 of which--the-correspond-ing wall-Lof the-duct 2 constitutes anextension.

v'The interiorA-.structure orjcasing `3`is made 4up vofj airont wall- 20, arear-wall-2l ltop, and bottom '-Walls 22 `and '23',"respectively, andend Walls 24.

The latter ftvallslependfromthe -endsof thettop wall-.22 a`suitable-distanceand terminateat-their lower ends .in-outwardlyinolinedr-portions 25 that .join .the :end 7walls +2 ons le of `the housing, the

latter vwalls being provided with openings -26 Limmediatelyabovesaid portionsl-E. A wallextension orpartition 21 extendsacrossthetop vof the-casing "3 and ldown `the -ends -thereoffin --the plane* of =the back wall-2 l, ythe side por-tions of f said rextension Voripartition itting the-:inclinedfportions`2-5'of the end walls 24. Thus, iatvertical fpas'sage A-is s'et ofi, separate 'from the Vair circulating space gof the heater, through which :outside fair is 'Supplied lto the bottom of lthe combustionichambe'rf'a's `Awill hretinafter more fully appear. The Arear wall 2"l of the casing y3, below E"the aforesaid inclined p'otio'ns 25,':extends'1to'the'endrwalls of thefiiousing, but stops 'shor't1of it'he bottom v7wall 23 so `fas 'to provide fan air passage therberioath. bottom Wall23r'i's extended rearwardly lyorid the Wer-'tical plane 'of `the wall"2l`ai1'd joinstlie 'lower edge offtherearwau il-fl ortho housing. @ruote- 'forementioned ilfuel is Tof fa 'width equalto he distance foe-weon fthe ena fwans '24 and is tostttonel -in thc'fu'ct "2 inspac'ed relation 'to all walls thereof, lsuitable *means (not shown) poing employed for maintaining the 'Walls )of y"the flue'in 'properly 'spaoe relation to the 'walls or thofdiiot. 'Shown :'as 'appliei to the Ainner 7and 'outer jsrfacie's 'of -tho'froot v vau zo and tho-top vivan 22 of themterior casing vilare'heat"transfer ns 30.

situated 'within a Ac'o'rmoustion chamber lC, :ericlosed by the 'casing 3, isa 'combustion device 35,

shown as a gas burner 'incorporating a ini-kingtuoe 36. Gas is supplied tothe mixing tubo 'of the tburner through a pipe 31 equipped with 'a valve '38 oy'whioh the 'gas Jmaybe turned off 'and on. Also rinoluz'iodin :the gas supply connections,

and Aanauto-matie control `moans 1:1.,'the1atteroeing of 'usual character and serving to 'regoitejtho flow of gas4 according yto temperature requirements. A pilot 'burner y115, arranged in lighting 'rolation Atothe burner 35, is "formed by 'a tubo that joins the gas supply pipe 31 ahead of the valve 38 that overhangs the window ledge L, thereby to assist in holding the heater in proper relation to the wall and window; and the rear edge portion of the top wall 5l) is depressed and shaped to receive the lower edge of the window sash S, thereby to effectively close the joint between the sash and the heater throughout the width of the latter. As Aappears from Fig. 1, the heater is somewhat narrower than the window and is arranged centrally thereof, and the parts of the opening between the sash and window sill, beyond the ends of the heater, are occupied by closure means 55.

The pilot burner 45 may be lit when the cock 41 is opened by projecting a match through aligned holes 56 in the adjacent end walls of the housing and casing. Now, by opening the valve 38, gas is supplied to the burner 35 under control of the pressure regulator 40 and automatic control means 4I and is ignited from the pilot burner. The products of combustion from the burner are led to the outside of the building through the flue 4 while fresh air enters through the surrounding portion of the duct 2 and passes downwardly through the vertical passage between the rear wall 2l of the casing and the corresponding wall Il of the housing and to the rear of the wall extension or partition 21 and enters beneath the wall 2| into the bottom of the space occupied by the burner, thereby to furnish primary air through the mixing tube Scand secondary air directly to the flame of the burner. The fact that the combustion air is warmed as it enters by heat from the flue and combustion Vchamber wall, increases the efficiency of the burner. also transmitted from the combustion chamber through the walls and 22 to the circulating space between the front and top walls of the housing and casing, such transmission of heat being enhanced by the heat transfer fins 30. The heated air is discharged from the circulating space into the room through an opening 51 that extends along the front of the housing adjacent the top thereof, while cool air enters said circulating space through the open bottom of the housing. Obviously, the outlet and/or inletvopeningsV of the circulating space may be covered `by grills, or said openings may consist of ornamental perforations in the walls of the housing.

To increase the movement of air through the circulating space, air impelling means may be incorporated in the heater, such being illustrated in. the present embodiment as a fan 60 that is driven by an electric motor 6I shown as sup- ;ported by a frame structure 62 in the lower portion of the housing. In any event, a thermo- Siphon circulation of air prevails through the passages between the end walls of the casing and housing, and to which passages air is admitted through the openings 26.

Thus it will be seen that my invention provides a very eiicient space heater of the circulating type, and incorporating a combustion device, that Heat is may be easily and quickly installed on a wall in connection with a window, and in which the combustion chamber and flue are effectively insulated by the disposition of the cool air ducts and passages thereby'to prevent radiation or transmission of intense heat from the interior structure to the adjacent or surrounding wall and window parts. Insulation of the top wall I5 permits it to be used as a support for general purposes.

Extension of the outlet end of the flue 4 beyond the inlet end of the duct 2, as shown in Fig. 2, insures against contamination of the air that is supplied to the burner through said duct, by the products of combustion escaping from the flue. However, by disposing the inlet of the duct and the outlet of the flue in proximity to each other, particularly as illustrated, air pressure is equalized between said inlet and outlet regardless of wind intensity or direction. It is evident, therefore, that dificulties encountered in combustion devices wherein the air inlet and ue outlet are distantly separated or remote from each other, and which difficulties are caused by atmospheric conditions-that is to say, by changes in air pressure and by the wind-are obviated in my improved arrangement.

Obviously, as a manufacturing expedient, the partition 21 may consist of the top and side marginal portions of a sheet of metal that forms, also, y

the rear wall 2| of the interior structure or casing 3.

Having thus described my invention, what I claim is:

1. A space heater for installation on the inner side of a building wall below a window, said heater comprising a housing including top, front and rear walls, and end walls that are joined to the lateral edges of the former walls, a duct extending rearwardly from the top of the housing and opening into the housing through said rear wall, an interior structure including front, rear and top walls that are spaced from the correspending walls of the housing, a bottom wall for the interior structure extending from the lower end of the front wall thereof to the bottom of the rear wall of the housing, a passage being pro# vided between the rear walls of said structure and housing that communicates at its upper end i with the aforesaid duct, a partition shutting off communication of said duct with the space between the top walls of said structure and housing, the rear wall of the structure being formed to provide communication between the bottom portion of said passage and the corresponding portion of the interior of the housing, end walls for the structure that depend from the top wall thereof and terminate at a point intermediate the top and bottom walls of the structure where they are deflected outwardly and join the end walls of the housing, the end walls of the housing hav-v ing air admitting openings that lead into the lower portions of passageways between the end walls of the structure and housing, the aforesaid partition including depending portions that separate said passageways from the previously mentioned passage, a combustion device within the interior structure, and a flue leading from the top portion of said interior structure. Y

2. A space hea-ter comprising the combination of elements defined by claim 1, and heat transfer fins projecting from the outersurfaces of theA top and front walls 4of the interior structure. v

3. A space heater comprising the combination of elements defined by claim 2, and air impelling means supported within the lower portion of the housing and arranged to move air upwardly through the space between the front walls of the interior structure and housing.

4. A space heater as defined by claim 1, wherein the top wall of the housing is insulated.

5. A space heater comprising the combination of elements defined by claim 1, and heat transi'er ns projecting from the inner surfaces ci' the top and front walls of the housing, those applied to said front wall being relatively wide and located above the top plane of the combustion device.

6. An space heater comprising the combination of elements defined by claim 1, and air impelling means supported within the lower portion of the housing and arranged to move air upwardly through the space between the front walls of the interior structure and housing.

7. A space heater comprising a wide and relatively shallow from front-to-rear rectangular housing for installation on the inner side of a building wall below a window, a duct leading rearwardly from the upper portion of the housing and corresponding in width therewith and adapted to project out through the windowbetween the window frame and sash, an interior rectangular structure enclosing a combustion chamber and setting off a circulating space separate from said chamber that opens exteriorly of the housing at top and bottom, said structure being only slightly less in horizontal cross sectional area than the housing and including a fiue equal in vwidth therewith that leads rearwardly from the'top portion of the combustion chamber through the aforesaid duct in spaced relation to the surrounding walls thereof to provide a passage about the flue leading into and downwardly within the rear portion of the housing and substantially throughout the width thereof, said passage communicating with the bottom portion of the combustion chamber, and a combustion device within the combustion chamber and occupying a major portion of the horizontal across sectional area thereof.

8. A space heater comprising a wide and relatively shallow from front-to-rear rectangular housing for installation on the inner side of a building wall below a window, a duct extending rearwardly from the top portion of the housing and 'adapted to project out through the window between the window sill and sash, the duct extending substantially the full .width of the housing and being relatively shallow in a vertical direction, the bottom of the duct being provided with an abrupt vertical shoulder adapted to overhang the outer edge of the window ledge and the top of the housing being depressed to receive the window sash, an interior rectangular structure enclosing a combustion chamber and setting oil' ai circulating space separate from said chamber that opens exteriorly of the housing at top and bottom, said structure being only slightly less in horizontal cross sectional area than the housing and including a ue equal in width therewith that leads rearwardly from the top portion of the combustion chamber through the aforesaid duct in spaced relation to the walls thereof to provide a passage through the duct adjacent the flue leading into and downwardly within the rear portion of the housing and substantially through the width charge its products into the combustion cham--l ber.

9. A space heater characterized by the combination and arrangement of elements set forth in claim 7, and heat tranfer :tins extending inwardly and outwardly from the wall of said interior structure that separates the combustion chamber from said air circulating space.

10. A space heater characterized by the combination and arrangement of elements set forth in. claim 7, and air impelling means situated in the lower part of the housing for moving air upwardly therethrough.

11. A space heater comprising a relatively wide housing that is shallow from front to rear and. that is adapted to be attached to a wall beneath a window in spaced relation to the floor, a duct of substantially the same width as the housing extending rearwardly from the top portion thereof and adapted to project through the window between the window frame and sash, a casing in the housing in slightly, rearwardly spaced relation to the front wall of the latter to provide a circulating space, the casing extending substantially from side to side of the housing and enclosing a combustion chamber, a flue of substantially the same width as the casing extending rearwardly from the top portion thereof out 'through the aforesaid duct and arranged therein to provide a passage about the ilue for incoming air, the rear of the casing being spaced forwardly from the rear wall of the housing to provide a space into the upper end of which said passage opens and which space communicates at its lower end with the combustion chamber substantially throughout the width of the latter, the housing having air inlet and air outlet openings communicating, respectively, with the lower end and upper end of the circulating space, and a combustion device consisting of an elongated burner arranged within the casing with its longer axis substantially parallel with the front and rear walls of the casing.

12. A space heater characterized by the combination and arrangement of elements set forth in claim 11, and air impelling means supported within the'lower portion of the housing and arranged to move air-upwardly therethrough.

13. A spacer heater as defined by claim 1l, wherein the top wall of the housing is insulated.

MARC RESEK.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the le of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2759472 *Dec 15, 1952Aug 21, 1956Cartter William GOverhead fuel burning heaters
US2780217 *Jun 15, 1953Feb 5, 1957Eureka Williams CorpFluid heating furnace with rotary combustion and heat exchange casing
US2804066 *Jun 16, 1953Aug 27, 1957Coleman CoWindow-supported hot air heater
US2811095 *Nov 5, 1954Oct 29, 1957Moran William OPositive draft controller
US3092095 *Oct 29, 1959Jun 4, 1963Hupp CorpFuel burning hot air heater
US3266479 *Apr 23, 1964Aug 16, 1966Lear Siegler IncSpace heater support
US3693610 *Dec 10, 1970Sep 26, 1972West Creek Co IncCamping stove
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US4664311 *Aug 29, 1985May 12, 1987Duty Cycle, Inc.Mounting for duty cycle control switch for ceiling mounted ductless heater
US4777929 *Feb 10, 1987Oct 18, 1988Temper-Sensor, Inc.Mounting for duty cycle control switch for ceiling mounted ductless heater
US5320086 *Feb 16, 1993Jun 14, 1994Majco Building Specialties, L.P.Direct vent gas appliance with vertical and horizontal venting
US5947113 *Feb 24, 1998Sep 7, 1999The Majestic Products CompanyDirect vent gas appliance with vertical and horizontal venting
US5979433 *May 24, 1995Nov 9, 1999Brivis Australia Pty Ltd.Heater
US6463926Jun 9, 2000Oct 15, 2002American Hearth Systems, Inc.Direct vent fireplace with baffled, directional exhaust and vent air column
US7686011 *Sep 15, 2006Mar 30, 2010United States Stove CompanyCompact window heating unit utilizing pelletized fuel
Classifications
U.S. Classification126/110.00B, 454/241, 126/90.00R, 126/85.00B, 126/116.00B, 454/196
International ClassificationF24C3/00
Cooperative ClassificationF24C3/004
European ClassificationF24C3/00A1