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Publication numberUS2583821 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 29, 1952
Filing dateNov 12, 1948
Priority dateNov 12, 1948
Publication numberUS 2583821 A, US 2583821A, US-A-2583821, US2583821 A, US2583821A
InventorsDu Bois John H
Original AssigneeShaw Insulator Company
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Metering spray applicator
US 2583821 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Jan. 29, 1952 H. DU BOIS 2,583,821

METERING SPRAY APPLICATOR Filed Nov. 12, 1948 INVENTOFQ JOHN H. DUBOIS 'BYWQILW ATTORNEYS Patented Jan. 29, 1952 METERING SPRAY APPLICATOR John 11. Du Bois, Scotch Plains, N. 1., assignor to .S'haw Insulator Company, .lryingtoniN. .L, a corporation of NewgJersey V Application'November 12, 1948, Serial No; 59,717

,4 .Claims. (Cl. 2991-901 This inventionre'lates "to dispensing containers and more particularlyyto containers for discharging a-measured amount of a liquid as an atomized spray.

The invention is extremely-useful iii-dispensing aliquid medicinal-preparation as a spray into the "nasal passages. "Containers embodying the invention are also suitable for the packaging and dispensing of other "liquid products suchas antiseptic medication, facial astringents; cologne; hand, face and after-shaving lotions; hair lacquers; deodorants; insecticides; and shoe polish.

An object of the invention-is to provide an improved dispensing container of the described character which may be readily manufactured and utilized in asimple manner.

Other objects and the advantages of the invention are described in, or will beapparent from, the following specification and the accompanying drawings to which reference is-made and in which:

Fig. Us a front elevation of a-dispensing container oratomizer embodying the present invention;

Fig. 2 is a side elevation of the atomizer shown inFig. 1;

Fig. 3 an enlarged cross-sectional-yiew taken on line 3- 3 of Fig. 1 of a portionof the atomizer showing liquid measuring, atomizing and discharge structure embodied in the container; and

Fig. 4 is a perspective view of the atomizer shown Figs. -1-3, inclusive.

Referring to Figs. 1, 2 and 4, the container, designated generally by the numeral 1, comprises a continuous side wall 2 and integral bottom 3 together with either a permanently attached or removable cover 4. The illustrated container 1 including the cover flare molded, although either or both may be otherwise fabricated, of a resilient plastic material, preferably transparent or at least translucent, as, for example, polyethylene. If desired the cover 4 may be formed of rigid material.

In accordance with the invention, the container I serves both as a packaging receptacle for a nasal spray or other liquid preparation, and also serves :as a squeezable bulb with which to produce the necessary fluid pressure for dispensing the liquid from thecontainer as an atomized spray. Preferably, the cover '4 and bottom 3 of the container are relatively thick and therefore substantially shape-retaining. The illustrated cover or top 4 is convex to increase its own shape retaining and restoring character and also that Of "the assembled container atomizer. The side wall 2 maybe of a lesser thickness-and is readily collapsed merely by a manual gripping :and squeezing pressure and without greatly deform! ing-thecover 4 or bottom wall 3. Inaddition to their shape retaining property, thecover Aand bottom it provide a self shape restoring propertylwhich-servestohasten and assure the return or the partially collapsed container to the shape illustrated in the drawings when squeezing pressure is relieved.

*The-coverlandbottom ipreferablyare of oval outline and the "cross-section of the container side wall -2 of similar-oval con-tour tosuggest and to facilitate squeezing by the user. llhe side wall *2 may be wertical or, as fll-us'tratedl in the drawings, provided with a slight inward and downward draft to facilitate removal of :the container after its formation in a mold.

As-shown in Fig. 3, the-cover t is provided with a downwardly extending rim 5 which fits; snugly within upper lip portion --or mouth 6 of the container. The fit-of the rim 5 in the mouth -6 may be a friction type -or preierablyasshown in Fig. 3, improved and made more secure by a mating rib 5a and groove fia connection. Preferably the cover 4 is heat-sealed or otherwise cemented to thecontainer to assure aliquid-tight seal. However, if access to the interior of the container is to be had by removal of the cover 4', the latter preferably is provided with a protruding pe ri-pheral edge which extends slightly beyondthe side wall 2 of the closed container to facilitate removaland replacement.

In accordance with the invention, a discharge nozzle '8 is removably secured by a fluid-tight press lit in a suitable opening i-n the cover 4 at the front and out of concentricity with the container. In the embodiment illustrated, the discharge nozzle *8 ii-n the "form of a domeshaped nose piece adapted tofit into nasal passageways. The external surface of the nozzle 8 is provided with grooves 9 "which permit the escape of air from the nostril so that the dispensing unit may be usedto discharge anasalspray without possible iniuryto the nasal passage by air-pressure.

Extending axially through the discharge nozzle is an irregularly shaped passageway, generally designated 10, in the lower portion of which the upper end of a length of'flexible tubing .H :is

secured by a press fit. A mixing chamber por-.

tion 12 *inthe upper end of the passage-way I l), communicates with the interior of the container through the tubing 1 I and "through grooves portion +3 and I 4 in the sides of the passageway Mr aasasci The grooves l3 and [4 are separated from the bore of the tubing H by the tubing wall so that the grooves l3 and I4 and the tubing bore each provides a separate duct communicating with the mixing chamber l2 and the interior of the container. The passageway Ill also includes a restricted portion l5 which is the discharge outlet from the mixing chamber l2; From an inspection of Fig. 3, it will be seen that the cover 4 and its discharge nozzle 8 including the passageway it and its mixing chamber portion l2, its grooves 43 and I4, and its discharge orifice portion [5 may be readily molded by a simple molding operation.

When the cover 4 is securedon the container; the lower end of the tube ll extends into a measa uring well or cup 16 formed in the front portion adjacent the top of the wall'2'ofthe' container. The measuring cup I6 may be of any desired size from a fraction to several cubic centimeters. Preferably it is provided with a downwardly and outwardly sloping bottom wall ll which serves to directthe lower end of the tube ll towards the lowermost point in the Well and to assure draining ,of the well to the lower end of the tube ll. As shown in Fig. 3, the well It is defined partly by the wall 2 of the container and partly by an additional wall i8. A portion of the container underlying the well 16 may be undercut as at 19 to facilitate molding the well [6 in (a the container'proper While utilizing the least amount of excess molding material.

In operation, the container 1 is filled with a liquid nasal spray or similar product to a level 20 which permits the maximum contemplated squeezing and collapse of the container in an upright position without the liquid level rising sufficiently to overflow into the well IS. A liquid level mark may be provided in or on the container wall 2 to designate this maximum height. In

the illustrated embodiment, the undercut surface, [9 underlying the well It constitutes such a mark and makes any additional mark unnecessary.

Where the container, as in the case of the one illustrated, is-formed of polyethylene which is translucent, the level to which the container is filled may be readily determinedby inspection.

vWith the, container filled with liquid to the level 20, the-cover 4 is attached firmly and the lower-end-of the tube ll directed by the sloping wall I] to the bottom of the well [6 whereupon the container is ready foruse as. an atomizer.

When it is desired to discharge a measured amount of the liquid as a spray, the upright container l is tilted until the front portion including the well I6 is completely submerged and filled. Thereafter the container is righted and a measured amount of liquid captured in the brimful well I6. In the case of small diameter wells (three-eights of an inch or less) surface tension normally is sufficient to keep the well filled even though the container thereafter is tilted from the upright position. In fact, in the case of aqueous liquids, the container may be inverted and, in the absence of jarring or shaking, the well will remain filled.

,Whena lesser charge of liquid is required, a portion may be poured from the well, jarring of the container ordinarily being sufiicient to overcome the surface tension or capillary action of small diameter wells. The level of the liquid in the well It may be readily observed through the translucent wall 2 and the. amount of liquid in the well estimated or determ nedb reference to 4. suitable graduations (not shown), on the container wall 2.

Having charged the well It: with a full or predetermined lesser charge of liquid, the discharge nozzle 8 is inserted in a nostril and squeezing pressure manually exerted on the container wall 2 to dispense the charge as an atomized spray into the nasal passage. It will be understood'that squeezing the container increases the internal air pressure forcing the liquid in the well It up through the tube ll into the mixing chamber 12.

There the measured charge of liquid is entrained by air escaping from the squeezed container through the ducts l3 and i4 and is discharged as an atomized spray through the discharge orifice l5 into the nasal passage or similar area to be treated. When the liquid charge has been dispensed from the well It, the squeezing pressure is relieved. Thereupon, the container returns to its self -restoring and self-maintaining shape and, in so returning, draws air through the or fice l5 and ducts l3 and I4 into the container preparatory to a recharging of the well It and a repetition of the atomizing operation. v If it is desired, the liquid content may be discharged from thecontainer in regulable amounts as a liquid stream merely by inverting the bottle so that liquid fills the chamber I2, and, thereafter, apply pressure to the container wall 2. Depending upon the amount of pressure exerted, the liquid is discharged from the nozzle either in drops or as a controlled stream. I 7 V The size of the nozzle aperture. [5 is a principal factor in determining the fineness of the spray or size of the drops discharged, more restrictive apertures providing finer or more highly atomized spray and smaller drops.

It will be seen that the invention provides a container which, itself, servesas a dispenserof its contents either in a predetermined measured charge or dose as an atomized spray or as a stream in regulable quantity. Furthermore, the embodiment illustrated is always in readiness for it several functions without a need for separate applicators.

Dispensing containers embodying the invention, in addition to their simplicity of construction, requires no parts of metal or other;corrodable materials, and, in fact, may bemanufactured from virtually unbreakable plastic materials by simple molding and extrusion operations.

Either the cover 4 or nozzle 8, or both, may be removable so that the user may refill or add liquid as desired. The seller may put a powder or drug in the container at assembly. This will. have good shelf life and the user may make the solution when ready to use the device by adding liquid to the proper level and dissolving the powder.

Dispenser-containers embodying-the invention are attractive to manufacturers and merchandizers of pharmaceuticals, perfumes, and other products which preferably should be atomized and applied in measured quantities or doses,

While only a single embodiment of the inven tion has been illustrated and described, the scope of the invention as defined by the appended claims, includes modifications thereof as wellas other embodiments which will be apparent to those skilled in the art and which come within the scope of the claims.

I claim: r 1. A dispensing container including a flexible receptacle having a flexible side wall and a'widef.

m u blin a recov r. ewerage a e;

receptacle, a discharge nozzle projecting upwardly from the cover, said nozzle having an axially extending passageway with a discharge orifice portion at its upper end and a mixing chamber portion below said orifice, a tube having one end secured in the lower portion of the passageway with the bore of the tube in communication with the mixing chamber, a grooved portion in said passageway forming with the outer Wall of the tube a duct connecting the mixing chamber with the interior of the flexible receptacle, a measuring well within the receptacle, said well being open at the top and having a bottom wall located upwardly from the bottom of the receptacle, said well having a mouth entirely uncovered with respect to said flexible side wall and wide-mouth lip of the receptacle, the lower end of the tube being directed to and supported at the bottom of the well.

2. A dispensing container including a flexible receptacle having a flexible side wall and a widemouth lip, a top cover secured to the lip of said receptacle, a discharge nozzle projecting upwardly from the cover, said nozzle having an axially extending passageway with a discharge orifice portion at its upper end and a mixing chamber portion below said orifice, a tube having one end secured in the lower portion of the passageway with the bore of the tube in communication with the mixing chamber, a grooved portion in said passageway forming with the outer wall of the tube a duct connecting the mixing chamber with the interior of the flexible receptacle, a measuring well within the receptacle, said well being open at the top and having a bottom wall which slopes outwardly and downwardly to a low point laterally oflset out of alignment with the portion of the passageway securing said tube, said bottom wall of the well being located upwardly from the bottom of the receptacle, said well having a mouth entirely uncovered with respect to said flexible side wall and wide-mouth lip of the receptacle, the lower end of the tube being directed to and supported by the bottom wall of the well adjacent the low point of the well and out of alignment with the top end of said tube when the cover portion is secured to the receptacle.

3. A dispensing container including a flexible receptacle having a flexible side wall and a widemouth lip,-a top cover secured to the lip of said receptacle, a discharge nozzle projecting upwardly from the cover, said nozzle having an axially extending passageway with a discharge orifice portion at its upper end and a mixing chamber portion below said orifice, a tube having one end secured in the lower portion of the passageway with the bore of the tube in communication with the mixing chamber, a grooved portion of said passageway forming with the outer wall of the tube a duct connecting the mixing chamber with the interior of the flexible receptacle, a measuring well within the receptacle, said well being open at the top and having a bottom wall located upwardly from the bottom of the receptacle, and having an undercut bottom surface which forms the top of an openbottoin recess having a side wall extending inwardly of the flexible side wall of said receptacle, the side wall or said recess extending generally in the same direction as said side wall of the receptacle, said well having a mouth entirely uncovered with respect to said flexible side wall and wide-mouth lip of the receptacle, the lower end of the tube being directed to and supported at the bottom of the well.

4. A dispensing container including a flexible receptacle having a flexible side wall and a widemouth lip, a top cover secured to the lip of said receptacle, a discharge nozzle projecting upwardly from the cover, said nozzle having an axially extending passageway with a discharge orifice portion at its upper end and a mixing chamber portion below said orifice, a tube having one end secured in the lower portion of the passageway with the bore of the tube in communication with the mixing chamber, a grooved portion in said passageway forming with the outer wall of the tube a duct connecting the mixing chamber with the interior of the flexible receptacle, a measuring well within and integral with the flexible side of the receptacle, said well being open at the top and having a bottom wall which slopes outwardly and downwardly to a low point laterally offset out of alignment with the portion of the passageway securing said tube, said bottom wall of the well being located upwardly from the bottom of the receptacle and having an undercut bottom surface which forms the top of an open-bottom recess having a side wall extending inwardly of the flexible side wall of said receptacle, the side wall of said recess extending generally in the same direction as said side wall of the receptacle, said well having a mouth entirely uncovered with respect to said flexible side wall and wide-mouth lip of the receptacle, the lower end of the tube being directed to and supported by the bottom wall of the well adjacent the low point of the well and out of alignment with the top end of said tube when the cover portion is secured to the receptacle.

JOHN H. DU BOIS.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in th .flle of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 630,277 Weitling Aug. 1, 1899 928,884 Randall July 20, 1909 1,655,678 Dorment Jan. 10, 1928 1,968,366 Bailey July 31, 1934 2,331,117 Goodhue et a1. Oct. 5, 1943

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US630277 *May 13, 1899Aug 1, 1899William W WeitlingAtomizer.
US928884 *Sep 4, 1906Jul 20, 1909Victor E RandallInhaler.
US1655678 *Sep 21, 1923Jan 10, 1928Albert T FletcherAtomizer
US1968366 *Jul 29, 1932Jul 31, 1934Vilbiss CoNasal guard for atomizers
US2331117 *Oct 3, 1941Oct 5, 1943Claude R WickardDispensing apparatus
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2676060 *Feb 18, 1950Apr 20, 1954Montenier Jules BLiquid atomizer device
US2723881 *Dec 10, 1949Nov 15, 1955Tupper Earl SAtomizer
US4564129 *Jan 27, 1983Jan 14, 1986Hoechst-Roussel Pharmaceuticals Inc.Dosage dispensing unit
US5119971 *Jan 10, 1991Jun 9, 1992Reyman Mark EDevice for controlled measuring and dispensing of a fluid
US5174478 *Jan 16, 1992Dec 29, 1992Reyman Mark EDevice for the controlled measuring and dispensing of a fluid
US5259536 *Dec 16, 1992Nov 9, 1993Reyman Mark EDevice for the controlled measuring and dispensing of a fluid
US5279450 *Jun 23, 1993Jan 18, 1994Witt Jr Donald CContainer with two separate chambers
US5363991 *Nov 2, 1993Nov 15, 1994Reyman Mark EDevice for the controlled measuring and dispensing of a fluid
US7607534 *Oct 20, 2004Oct 27, 20093M Innovative Properties CompanyDevice for storing and dispensing a flowable substance
US8322576 *Apr 23, 2010Dec 4, 2012Gioia Constantine MSpray bottle reservoir system
US8925544Mar 7, 2012Jan 6, 2015Medinvent, LlcPortable nebulizer device
US9402947Dec 22, 2014Aug 2, 2016Medinvent, LlcPortable fluid delivery system for the nasal and paranasal sinus cavities
US9440020Feb 24, 2012Sep 13, 2016Medinvent, LlcNasal irrigator
US20080003049 *Oct 20, 2004Jan 3, 2008Marc PeukerDevice for storing and dispensing a flowable substance
US20100270334 *Apr 23, 2010Oct 28, 2010Gioia Constantine MSpray bottle reservoir system
USD763434Dec 22, 2014Aug 9, 2016Medinvent, LlcIntranasal therapy delivery system
Classifications
U.S. Classification239/327, 128/200.14, 222/464.3, 239/350, 239/371
International ClassificationA61M11/02, A61M11/00
Cooperative ClassificationA61M11/02
European ClassificationA61M11/02