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Publication numberUS2584459 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 5, 1952
Filing dateJan 6, 1947
Priority dateJan 6, 1947
Publication numberUS 2584459 A, US 2584459A, US-A-2584459, US2584459 A, US2584459A
InventorsCorwill Jackson
Original AssigneeJackson Vibrators
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Machine for placing concrete and the like
US 2584459 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Feb. 5, 1952 C, JACKSON 2,584,459

MACHINE FOR PLACING CONCRETE AND THE LIKE Filed Jan, 6, 1947 2 SHEETSSHEET l Feb. 5, 1952 c. JACKSON 2,584,459

MACHINE FOR PLACING CONCRETE AND THE LIKE Filed Jan. 6, 1947' 2 SHEETS- Smm 2 //V VE N TOR. Cora/II! Jackson EY www? F1T- A TTORNEY Patented Feb. 5, 1952 MACHnvE Foa PLACING CONCRETE y y AND THE LIKE Corwill Jackson, Ludington, Mich., assignor to- Jackson Vibrators, Inc., Luding-ton, Mich., a corporation of Michigan Application January 6, 19471, Serial No. 720,364

13 Claims.

K This invention relates to machines for placing concrete and the like.

' Thelmain objects of this invention are:

First, to provide a machine for placing concrete and other materials by vibration and for screeding the same which is highly efficient and at the Ysame time adapted for manual manipulation with a minimum of eiiort on the part of the operator.

Second, to provide a machine having these advantages in which the vibratory screed member is vibrated with substantially uniform amplitude throughout the length thereof.

Third, to provide a placement machine adapted for the subjection of concrete at high frequency vibration and the effective screeding thereof.

Fourth, to provide a machine having these advantages in which the vibratory member is adapted to rearwardly support a substantial mass of concrete as it is advanced against the same and one in which the vibrations act to automatically advance the machine.

Fifth, to provide a machine of the class described employing a relatively long thin vibratory member, such for example as a, wood plank in which the vibrations are of substantiallyuniform amplitude throughout the vibratory member.

Sixth, lto provide a simple and effective means for harmonizing the vibrations throughout the length of the vibratory member and counteracting the damping effect which tends to reduce thevibrations in the lower. portion of the vibratory -member as it is advanced against the material treated. l Objects relating. to details and economies of the invention will appear'from the description to follow. The invention is defined and pointed out in the claims;

Prefrlzrredembodiments of the invention are illustrated in Vthe accompanying drawings, in which: x

- VFig. 1 'is a plan view of a machine embodying the invention, the tendency forvportions thereof to vibrate at dierent amplitudes as compared to other portions 'being indicated by dotted lines. Figk2 'is an 'enlarged fragmentary front elevation."

vFig.'3-i s an enlarged fragmentary view partially in sectionon the broken line 3-3 of Fig.`l.

Fig. 4 is a fragmentary end elevation of the vibratory member and the vibration producing motor with a portion of the motor broken away and sectioned to show the unbalanced rotor, the desirable-uniformity of vibrations at the top and bottom being indicated by the dotted crossed lines.

Fig. 5is aview corresponding to that of Fig. si, the dotted lines indicating the tendency of the top portion-of the vibratory member to vibrate with excessive amplitudewhile thevibrations in the lower portion thereof are'dampened or the amplitude reduced very materially by the load of the material treated as the vibrator member is advanced against the same.

Fig. 6 is a view corresponding to that of Fig. 5 with the counterweight or synchronizing weight applied to the vibratory member to 'counteract the tendency of the upper part of the vibratory member to vibrate with undesired amplitude or while the lower portion has insuicient amplitude of vibration.

Fig. 7 is a fragmentary plan view illustrating details of the mounting of the wheel supports or wheel carrying brackets on the vibratory member.

It is frequently desirable to provide vibratory screeds of the type illustrated of considerable length, running up to twenty feet or more. It involves quite an expense to crate a machine having a screed of this length or even of substantially less length for shipment. Wood planks may be used and these are usually available where the machine is to be used. However, these planks differ not only in dimensions but in quality and it is found that there is a substantial variation in the amplitude of the vibrations between the vibration producing means of the screed and also that when the vibratory screed is advanced against ya mass of concrete, for example, the mass deadens or dampens the vibrations at the bottom of the screed where it is required for efcient operation, the top of the screed in effect .pivotally vibrating around the lower portion thereof.

One of the main objects of this invention is to provide a structure of this character in which the amplitude of vibrations is substantially uniform throughout the length of the screed and also from top to bottom thereof resulting in vibration of the bottom portion of the screed with sufficient amplitude to effectively vibrate the material that is being placed. As shown in Fig. 1 in which the vibration indicating lines are greatly exaggerated it will be seen that there are relatively dead zones between the vibrating means and the zones of greater vibration and in Fig. 5 I have illustrated by dotted lines the dampening effect on the vibrations at the-bottom of the screed when it is advanced against the .mass treated.

Another advantage of the structure is that the machine is automatically advanced-that is, the vibrations of the screed propel the machine forwardly. There is some tendency for that to occur even where the vibrations are not equalized but the forward traveling of the machine is greatly enhanced by the structure which results in producing vibrations of uniform amplitude throughout the vibratory member.

The embodiment of the invention illustrated in the accompanying drawings comprises the viand the ends of the screeds. other Yzones perhaps having an excessive amplitude of vibration. I have attempted to illustrate that by dotted lines in Fig. 1. Further than that, the load of the material treated bearing on the lower portion of the vibratory screed dampens the amplitude Y of vibration of the lower part thereof so that the upper part Vibrates with excessive ampliforwardly directed edge of the nose piece tends somewhat to shear 01T the concrete or other material placed and minimizes the tendency to lift the vibratory screed.

The vibratory Vscreed is supported in an upright position by means of the pairs of front and rear roller-like wheels and 6 which are adapted to travel on forms, not illustrated. The front wheels are carried by the wheel supporting brackets 1. The rear wheels are carried by the wheel supporting brackets 8. These brackets are resiliently connected to the vibratory member by shock absorbing or vibration absorbing connections designated generally by the'numeral 9 which consist of the pairs of lugs I and II having resilient blocks I2 secured thereto, the purpose being to provide effective supporting means for the wheel supporting brackets while minimizing the vibrations transferred thereto from the vibratory member.

To relieve these vibration absorbing connections of a considerable portion of torsional stress, the front and rear wheel supporting bracketsare connected by the arms I3, the arms of which..

are secured to the Wheel supporting brackets, the yokes extending above the vibratory member. The details of bolting the several yparts together are not described as it is believed that it will be clear from the drawings.

The front wheels are provided with a U-shaped guard I4 of substantial rigidity, the arms of the guardbeing secured to the front wheel brackets 'i with the bight substantially spaced in advance of the front wheel 5, the inner arm I5 of the guard being extended rearwardly to lap upon the front side of the vibratory member, see Fig. 1.

In the embodiment illustrated, the motor I6 is mounted on the rear side of the vibratory member and is provided with a rotor I1 having an unbalancing weight I8, the axis of the rotor being disposed longitudinally of the vibratory member. This motor I6 is disposed centrally relative to the length of the vibratory member and also centrally relative `to its vertical dimensions. Y Y

It Iwill, be understood that I do not in Fig. 1

make any attempt to show Athe parts in their relative dimensions or proportions and, as a matter of fact, the vibratory member would be much longer in proportion to the other parts than is illustrated. The electrical connections for the motor are not illustrated.

As stated, the vibratory member may be formed of a wood plank and if it is of suilicient and uniform width and thickness and of moderate length the vibrations from end to end are of substantially uniform amplitude. However, as stated, it is frequently desirable to provide vibratory members of considerable length, eighteen to twenty feet or more, for example, and the most satisfactory material is not usually available. The result is that in use the vibratory member does not vibrate with uniform amplitude from end to `end and there are usually what might be called dead zones betweenthe vibrating means tude, as illustrated in Fig. 5.

To counteract this advance in amplitude of vibration from both causes and to synchronize or equalize the vibrations throughout the vibratory member, I provide two or more counterbalancing weights I9 which are securely clamped upon the vibratory member adjacent the top thereof by means of the clamps 20 which are in the form of angled arms extending from the weights and carrying the clamping screws 2I which are adjusted to clamp the vibratory member opposite the weights, as shown in Fig. 3. These weights are desirably mounted in longitudinally spaced relation relative to the vibrating motor and desirably somewhat short of the point of greatest amplitude or vibration in the zones indicated by the dotted lines 22 in Fig. 1, these `being mounted at the top ofthe vibra'- tory member throughout the tendency for excessive amplitude vibration indicated by the dotted lines 23 in Fig. 5 which, as stated, results from the dampening of the vibrations in the lower part of the screed member by the materialtreated so that the vibrations become substantially of uniform amplitude from top to bottom las is vin'- dicated by the dotted lines 24 in Fig. 6. This results in a highly satisfactory vibratory memberv even when formed of relatively light stock and as the vibration counterbalancing weights are adjustable they may be located in the position to get the most effective results and in position required by the particular vibratory member, considering its length and inherent qualities.

The vibratory member is held in its upright position by the wheels and is free to'travel along the forms under `its own impetus. However, it is desirable to control the same and move it back and forth or to control its speed of advancement and perhaps add manual power to its advancement under certain conditions. To accomplish this, I provide the handles 25 and 26 which are the same except that the handle 26 has a control switch 21 mounted thereon. lThe connections from the control switch to the Vmotor lare not illustrated.

The handles `25 and 26 are swivelly mounted at 21I on the supports 28 which are in turn rotatably mounted on the rear wheel brackets or supports 8. 'Ihis permits the positioning of the handles as may be desired for convenientmanipulation.

Sometimes it is desired to tilt themachine on the rear wheels 6 and to accomplish this I provide pairs of facing hooks 29 `with which the handle may be selectively engaged to permit the lifting of the machine or tilting cof the lmachine on the rear wheels and the manipulation of the machine while. so tilted. The hooks are xedly secured to the arms I3 extendingupwardly from the wheel supporting brackets 1 and 8 as shown in Figs. l, 2 and 3.

I have illustrated and described my'lnvention in a very practical commercial embodiment thereof. I have not attempted to illustrate -or describe other embodiments or adaptations as it is believed that this disclosure will enable those skilled in the art to .embody or adapt the invention as may-be desired.

. .Having thus described my invention, what I claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent, is:

l. In a .machine of the class described, the Vcombination of an elongated plank-shaped vibratory member of vwood disposed vertically edgewise, said vibratory member constituting means for supporting forwardly thereof a substantial mass of material treated as it is advanced against the same, a motor provided with an unbalanced rotor mounted on the rear side and centrally of the vibratory. member with its-axis .disposed longitudinally thereof,front and rear wheel supporting brackets resiliently mounted on the frontand rear sides of said vibratory-member adjacent the, endsv thereof, wheels carried by said brackets and acting to support said vibratory member .in upright position, and weights disposed adjacent the upper edge of the vibratory member provided with clamps for adjustably securing them adjacent the upper edge ofthe vibratory member, the weights being supportingiy carried by said vibratory member be'- tween the rotor and the opposite ends of the vibratory member and in substantially spaced relation from said rotor and opposite ends to counteract the tendency of portions of the vibratory member to vibrate with greater amplitude than other portions thereof and to counteract ther vibration dampening eiect of the material treated as the vibratory member is advanced against the same. n

v2. In a machine ofthe class described, the

combination of an elongated plank-shaped vibratory member of wood disposed vertically vibratory member adjacent the ends thereof,

-wheels carried by said brackets and acting to support said lvibratory member in upright position, handles, means swingably connecting said handles to the rear brackets for vertical and horizontal swinging adjustment of said handles, and pairs of oppositely facing upwardly projecting hooks beneath which said handles may be selectively engaged for tilting the assembly rearwardly on the rear wheels, said hooks vbeing supportingly carried by said wheel supporting brackets.

3. In a machine of the class described, the combination of an elongated plank-shaped vibratory member of wood disposed vertically edgewise, said vibratory member constituting means for supporting forwardly thereof a substantial mass of material treated as it is advanced against the same, said vibratory member being provided with a shoe of angle section secured to the lower edge thereof with .the vertical arm of the shoe on the rear side of the vibratory member, said 'vibratory member also having a metal nose piece separate from said shoe secured to the front side of the vibratory member adjacent its lower edge, the lower portion of the nose piece extending downwardly and forwardly, the lower edge of the nose piece being. rdisposed forwardly of the forward edge of the horizontal arm of the shoe to provide a shearing edge, a motor provided with an unbalancedvrotor mounted on the rear side and centrally ofthe vibratory member with its axis disposed longitudinally thereof, front and rear wheel supporting brackets resiliently mounted on the front and rear sides of said vibratory member adjacent the ends thereof, and wheels carried by said brackets and acting to support said vibratory member in upright position.

4. In a machine of the class described, the combination of an elongated plank-shaped vibratory member of wood disposedvertically edgewise, said vibratory membery constituting means for supporting forwardly thereof a substantial mass of material treated as it is advanced against the same, a motorprovlded with an unbalanced rotor vmounted on the vibratory member with its axis disposed longitudinally thereof, front and rear wheel supporting brackets resiliently ,connected to said vibratory member adjacent the ends thereof, wheels carriedby said brackets and acting to support said vibratory vmember in upright position, and weights mounted'on the vibratory member adjacent the upper edge and between the rotor and the opposite ends of the vibratory member and in substantially spaced relation from said rotor and opposite ends to substantially counteract the tendency of portions of the vibratory memb'er to vibrate with greater amplitude than other portions thereof and to lcounteract the vibration restraining effect of the thrust of material treated as the vibratory member is advanced against the same. 5. In a machine of the class described, the combinati'o'n of an elongated wood plank-shaped vibratory member disposed vertically edgewise, said vibratory member constituting means for supporting forwardly thereof a substantial mass of material treated as it is advanced against the same, a rotor provided with an unbalancing weight mounted on the rear side of said vibratory member centrally thereof and with its axis disposed `longitudinally thereof, front and rear wheel supporting brackets mounted on said vibratory member adjacent the ends thereof, there being vibration absorbing means between said brackets and said vibratory member, wheels on said brackets, and handles swingably mounted Von the rear wheel brackets, said vibratory member having hooks xedly associated therewith, said handles being swingable to a position beneath said hooks for retaining engagement therewithffor tilting the apparatus on the rear wheels.

6. In a machine ofthe class described, the combination of an elongated plank-shaped vibratory member disposed vertically edgewise, said vibratory membervconstituting means for supporting forwardly thereof a substantial mass of material treated as it is advanced against the same, a lrotor provided with an unbalancing weight mounted on said vibratory member with its axis disposed horizontally thereof, means for supporting said vibratory member in upright position whereby it'tends to travel forwardly unassente the impulses of its vibration, said supporting means including travelingsupports and means connecting said traveling supports to said vibra-` tory Imember, Aand weights vmounted on the vibratory member between `said rotor and the oppositegends of the vibratory member andl in substantially spaced relation from said rotor and 8 supports and means connecting said traveling supports to .said vibratory member, and a weight adjustably secured to the vibratory member in spaced relation from said vibratory means and one of the opposite ends of said vibrating ymem v ber at a zone thereof tending to vibrate 'at an opposite ends to reduce tendency of Apor-tions `of the vibratory member to vibrate with greater amplitude than other portions thereof.

e. In a machine of the class described. the

combination of an elongated relatively thin vibratory member disposed vertically edgewise, said "vibratory member constituting means for supporting forwardly thereof a substantial mass l of material treated as it is advanced against the same, means for vibrating said vibratory member 'at high frequency, means for supporting said vibratory member in upright position whereby it tends to travel forwardly under the impulses of A its vibrations, said supporting means' including traveling supports and means connecting said traveling supports to said vibratory member, and

a Weight adjustably secured to the vibratory member and disposed adjacent the upper edge thereof for reducing the tendency of the upper portion of the vibratory member to vibrate with greater amplitude than the lower portion thereof when the lower portion is subject to the thrust of thematerial treated.

9. 1n a machine of the class described, the combination of an elongated relatively thin vibratory member disposed vertically edgewise, said vibratory member constituting means for supporting forwardly thereof a substantial mass of material treated 'as it is advanced against the same, means for vibrating said vibratory member at high frequency, 4means for supporting said vibratory member in upright position whereby it tends to travel forwardly under the impulses of its vibrations, said supporting means including traveling supports and means connecting said as it is advanced against the same, means for vibrating said vibratory -.member at high frequency, means for supporting said vibratory member in upright position whereby it tends to travel forwardly under the impulses of-its vibrations, said supporting means including traveling Aamplitude substantially exceeding the amplitude of another portion, the weight serving to dampen the vibrations of excessive amplitude in the .portion of the vibrating member to which the weight is secured. r

11. In a machine of the class described, the combination of an elongated relatively thin vibratoryrmember disposed vertically edgewise, said vibratory member constituting means for supporting forwardly thereof a substantial mass of material treated as it is advanced against the same, an unbalanced rotor mounted von the vibratory member with its axis disposed longitudinally thereof, form engaging members connected to said vibratory mem-ber and acting to support ysaid vibratory member in upright position. and a weight `mounted on the vibratory member adjacent the upper edge to substantially counteract the tendency of the portion of the vibratory member on which the weight is mounted to vibrate with greater amplitude than the lower portion of the vibrating member beneath the portion on which the weight is mounted under restraining effect of the thrust of material treated against the lower portion of the vibratory member as it is advanced against the material.

l2. In a machine of the class described, the combination of an elongated vibratory lmember disposed vertically edgewise, said vibratory `member .constituting means for supporting forwardly thereof a substantial mass Aof material treated as it is advanced against the same, an unbalanced rotor mounted fon the vibratory member with its axis disposed longitudinally thereof., and a weight mounted on the vibratory member in substan tially spaced relation from said rotor and one of the opposite ends of the vibrating member to substantially counteract the tendency of the portion of the vibratory member on which the weight is mounted to vibrate with greater ampli tude than adjoining portions thereof.

13. In a machine of the class described, the combination of a plank-'shaped vibratory member disposed vertically edgewise, said vibratory member :constituting vmeans for supporting forwardly thereof a substantial mass of material treated .as .it is advanced against the same. means for vibrating said vibratory member, and means for harmonizing the vibrations of the vibratory member substantially throughout comprising Weights adjustably mounted Von the vibratory member between said vibrating means and the opposite ends of the vibratory member land vin substantially spaced relation from said vibrating means and in zones thereof tending to vibrate with greater amplitude than other zones.

CORWILL JACKSON.

REFERENCES CITED The following .references are of record in the tile of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Nains Date 1,550,102 Schlueter Aug. 18, 1925 1,945,145 Gordon Jan. 30, 1934 2,110,413 Baily Mar. 8., 1938 2,219,246 Jackson Oct, 22, 1940 2,306,126 Jackson Dec. 22, 1942 2,322,362 Jacksonl.. f June 22, 1943

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1550102 *Nov 24, 1922Aug 18, 1925Schlueter Max LFloor-polishing machine
US1945145 *Apr 4, 1932Jan 30, 1934Viber Company LtdMethod of and apparatus for compacting and dewatering cementitious mixtures
US2110413 *Apr 15, 1935Mar 8, 1938William Baily RobertApparatus for controlling the transmission of vibrations
US2219246 *Oct 20, 1930Oct 22, 1940Corwill JacksonConcrete working apparatus
US2306126 *Jul 5, 1941Dec 22, 1942Corwill JacksonHand screed for the placement of concrete
US2322362 *Jul 21, 1941Jun 22, 1943Corwill JacksonConcrete placement machine
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2771012 *Apr 6, 1953Nov 20, 1956Jackson VibratorsCompactor for asphaltic and other compactable materials
US3008388 *Sep 24, 1956Nov 14, 1961Creative Metals CorpTelescoping vibratory concrete screed
US3224348 *May 9, 1962Dec 21, 1965Maginniss Hamilton JVibrating screed
US4229118 *Jan 17, 1979Oct 21, 1980Kisling Russell LScreed support
US4256416 *May 14, 1979Mar 17, 1981Bishop Roy IScreed for leveling freshly poured concrete
US4359296 *Feb 6, 1981Nov 16, 1982Cronkhite Daniel RVibrator for screed boards
US4650366 *Jul 23, 1986Mar 17, 1987Morrison Donald RConcrete
US4828427 *Jan 31, 1986May 9, 1989Phillip NisenbaumCement screed tool
US6302619Dec 22, 2000Oct 16, 2001Jerald P. FixPowered inertia propelled screed apparatus
US6474906 *Dec 10, 1999Nov 5, 2002Terramite CorporationSingle roller concrete finishing machine
US6953304Dec 5, 2003Oct 11, 2005Delaware Capital Formation, Inc.Lightweight apparatus for screeding and vibrating uncured concrete surfaces
US6976805Oct 8, 2002Dec 20, 2005Delaware Capital Formation, Inc.Light weight apparatus for screeding and vibrating uncured concrete surfaces
US7121762Jul 29, 2004Oct 17, 2006Somero Enterprises, Inc.Apparatus for screeding uncured concrete surfaces
US7320558Oct 13, 2006Jan 22, 2008Somero Enterprises, Inc.Apparatus for screeding uncured concrete surfaces
US7491011Dec 27, 2007Feb 17, 2009Somero Enterprises, Inc.Apparatus for screeding uncured concrete
US7850396Dec 29, 2008Dec 14, 2010Somero Enterprises, Inc.Wheeled screeding device
US7891906Feb 27, 2009Feb 22, 2011Somero Enterprises, Inc.Concrete finishing apparatus
US7909533Jan 21, 2009Mar 22, 2011Somero Enterprises, Inc.Apparatus for screeding uncured concrete surfaces
US8075222Feb 11, 2011Dec 13, 2011Somero Enterprises, Inc.Concrete finishing apparatus
Classifications
U.S. Classification404/114
International ClassificationE01C19/40, E01C19/22
Cooperative ClassificationE01C19/402
European ClassificationE01C19/40B