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Publication numberUS2584960 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 5, 1952
Filing dateMay 23, 1949
Priority dateMay 23, 1949
Publication numberUS 2584960 A, US 2584960A, US-A-2584960, US2584960 A, US2584960A
InventorsBeardsell Wallace A, Hay Warren H
Original AssigneeMonsanto Chemicals
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Liquid distributing device
US 2584960 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

5, 1952 w. A. BEK RDSELL ET AL 2,584,960

' LIQUID DISTRIBUTING DEVICE I Filed May 23, 1949 2 SHEETS-SHEET 1 17222832317315: WaZZaae flnfleafldsel Wauflez'z ay, by 5 r nqy Patented Feb. 5, 1952 assagiso LIQUID DISTRIBUTING DEVICE Wallace A. Beardsell, East Natick, and Warren H. Hay, Beverly, Mass., assignors to Monsanto Chemical CompamgSt. Louis, Mo., a corporation of Delaware Application May 23, 1949, Serial No. 94,802

The present invention relates to an improved liquid distributing device.

- It is often necessary both in laboratory and mill scale operations to supply a plurality of machines, devices or other apparatus which are performing identical operations with uniform streams of liquid in which the stream supplied to each machine is equal in amount and rate'of flow to the stream which is being supplied to each of the other machines, devices, etc. For example, in textile mills it is often necessary to apply a tint, oil or the like to a plurality of cotton rovings and to apply equal amounts and rates of such tint etc. to each roving. In chemical plants and laboratories it is often necessary to supply a number of similar reactors in which a chemical reaction is being carried out with equal amounts and rates of a liquid catalyst, chemical compound or chemical composition. In accomplishing these objects it has usually-been the practice to provide separate metering devices so that the same quantity and rate of liquid constituent could be supplied to each of such machines, devices, reactors, etc. This practice is not economical, however, both from the standpoint of first cost and of maintenance.

It is one object of this invention to provide a simple device for dividing and distributing a single metered stream of liquid into a plurality of equally metered streams of liquid.-

A further object of this invention is to prodescription when taken together with the .ac.-.

companying drawing and the appended claims. The liquid distributing device of the present invention includes a cylindrical trough or pan having a slightly conical-shaped bottom which is provided with a central aperture and with an annular raised portion or ridge which is spaced from the center of the pan. The pan bottom consists of concentric annular portionswhich.

slope slightly downward toward the center of the pan, the outer periphery of the inner an! nulus being slightly raised above the innerv periphery of the outer annulus, thereby forming anannular ridge spaced from the center and fromthe side wall of the pan. The lower per;

4 Claims. (Cl. 137166) tion of the pan is divided into pockets or compartments by radially extending'partitions which extend an equal distance up the side wall of the pan and an equal distance along the bottom toward the center of the pan. Each of the pockets or compartments thus formed is open at the top and toward the center of the pan, and has a discharge opening in the bottomof the pan positioned adjacent to and radially outward from the annular ridge. The device also includes rotating means for discharging a metered stream of liquid against theouter or side wall of the pan above the compartments therein at a constant angular velocity.

"A preferred embodiment of the liquid distributing device of this invention is illustrated in the drawings, in which Fig. 1 is a plan view of the liquid distributing device, and v Figure 2 is a vertical sectional view taken along line 22 of Figure 1.

In the drawings, in which like numerals refer to like parts, Iii refers to'a cylindrical trough or pan which comprises abase plate II, outer wall I2-and a reinforcing bottom portion l3 all of which are cemented together to form a liquidtight, unitary structure. The pan I0 is mounted on-a suitable support (not shown). The base plate l lv has inwardly sloping upper surfaces providing an annular raised portion or ridge i4 approximately midway between its outer edge and center. The pan iii is divided into pockets or compartments l5 of equal volume by means of radially positioned L-shaped partitions I6 which fit snugly against the plate II and outer wall 12. and are. cemented thereto. The top edges of partitionsliiare beveled. The inneredges of partitions. I6 are spaced concentrically from the centerof. plate H and terminate between the center of plate II and the annular ridge i4.

The compartments l5 each have discharge openings l'll infplate- H which are spaced concentrically from the; center of plate i I and immediately ad-jacentLto, and radially outward of the annular, ridge I 4. ,Thediameterof each discharge opening I! is the same and is substantiallyequal to the. distance between the partitions I6. Each discharge opening is internally threaded to 'receive a standard pipe fitting I8 which is equipped with a shut-off valve I9. Although only one pipe fitting and valve is illustrated it is to be understood that each discharge opening H is provided with a pipe fitting and valve if it is desired to employ each discharge opening for liquid distributing purposes. f An overflow opening 20 is go eainih eof l Th s-em ts,

is also internally threaded for receiving a suitable pipe fitting.

Liquid is distributed to pan I by means of a curved or bent tube 2I the vertical axis of which coincides with the vertical center axis of plate II. The tube 2I is provided with an integral gear wheel 22 and is supported in ball bearings 23 and 24 which are fastened to a suitable support. Tube 2| is also provided with a horizontal portion having a nozzle 25 at the discharge end, which rotates in a plane immediately above the partitions i8, and a funnel opening 2-5. The gear 22 is driven by a worm gear 2': which is in turn driven by means of an electric motor 28. The motor is fastened to a suitable support. Since gear 22 and tube 2| are integral, the tube 2| is caused to rotate about its vertical axis when gear 22 is rotated.

The pan I0 and partitions I 6 may be constructed out of any rigid material which does not distort or change dimensions on aging. As examples of materials which are suitable for use may be mentioned non-corrosive metals or alloys such as aluminum, copper, brass, stainless steel, etc. and plastic materials such as styrene, polyacrylates, polymethacrylates and the like. The pan I 0 and partitions I6 can be cast integrally from thermosetting resins such as phenolformaldehyde resins, melamine-aldehyde resins and the like or thermoplastic resins of the type described above.

The operation of the device is as follows:

A metered stream of liquid, having a substan tially constant volume "of flow per unit of time, is continuously supplied (from a conventional metering device and supply tube not shown) to the funnel opening 26 of tube 2| which is being driven at constant angular velocity through gears 22 and 21 by electric motor 28. The liquid is continuously discharged through nozzle opening 25 against the outer wall I2 of pan I0 above the L-shaped partitions IS. The liquid then flows down the inner surface of outer wall I2 in the form of a film and thence into the compartments I5. The upper beveled edges of partitions I6 serve the purpose of dividing the film of liquid flowing down the wall I2 so that each compartment receives an equivalent amount of liquid. The liquid film after reaching the bottom of the pan I0 flows downwardly toward the discharge openings I 1 and then out through the pipe fitting I8. It is thus possible by using the device iiius trated in Figures 1 and 2 to obtain, continuously,

24 separate and uniform streams of liquid from the single metered stream supplied to tube 2|.

This device can beoperated efliciently and with extreme flexibility. For purposes of illustration, 1t is assumed that a mill, plant, or laboratory has 24 devices, machines or reactors (not shown) that each require a stream of liquid which is equal in volume and rate of flow to each stream of liquid being supplied to each of the other devices, etc. Each of these devices is connected to a discharge opening" in pan I0 by means of pipe fitting I8, equipped with a valve I9, and suitable piping (not shown). By operating the liquid distributing device continuously it is possible to supply each device, etc. with a uniform stream of liquid. By increasing or decreasing the rate of flow and quantity of liquid supplied to tube 2| it is possible to increase or decrease the volume and rate of flow of each stream of liquid discharged from the liquid distributing device, proportionately.

If oneor more of the devices, etc. to which the stream of liquid. is being supplied is shut down for any reason or is not placed in operation, th

4 discharge line to that particular device is cut of! by closing valve I9. The liquid in this particular compartment then accumulates or collects until it rises above that segment of the annular ridge or annular raised portion I4 which lies between the partitions of the particular compartment and flows downwardly toward the overflow opening 20, out through this opening and into a storage tank or reservoir (not shown) from whence it is pumped back as a metered stream of liquid, to tube M. This does not in any way affect the streams of.liquid being discharged from the other compartments, but merely enables the operator to cut out any number of devices, etc. which no longer require a supply of liquid without affecting other devices, etc. which are still in operation. By using proper piping arrangements it is also possible to divert a stream of liquid from the discharge opening in any particular compartment to auxiliary machines, devices, etc. which are being held in stand by position or to devices, etc. which are being placed in operation.

The uniformity of flow of the liquid stream discharged from the discharge opening in each compartment depends primarily on the nature of the metered liquid, thespeed of rotation of tube 2|, the distance that the liquid travels from the point. where n strikes the wall to the dis charge opening andthe slope of the bottom of pan I II, the most important factor being the speed of rotation of tube 2 I. Each compartment obtains only an increment of the total quantity of liquid discharged through tube 2| on each revolution of the-tube. Therefore, it is necessary in order to obtain uniform streams of liquid to make the time interval between each increment as small as possible. In other words, it is necessary to have the tube 2| rotate rapidly so that the'increments supplied to each com partment or chamber follow in rapid order. Due to the fact that the liquid flows down the wall and bottom of the pan in the form of a film the pulsating effect of each increment is evened out and by the time the film reaches the dis charge opening I! the rate of flow is uniform. The practical limitations on the maximum speed of rotation of tube 2 I are those imposed because of undue splashing due to centrifugal force 8nd uneven distribution from tube 2| due to wind of fects, that is, a nonuniform stream of metered liquid resulting from eddy currents of air created by the rotation of tube 2|.

'Ihe liquid distributing device of this invention is useful for handling a large variety of liquids which have the property of wetting a surface and have sufficient viscosity to form and maintain a film. Thus, liquids such as water.- water solutions of metallic salts, water emul-' sions, silica aquasols and other colloidal solutions. oils, oil emulsions and the like can be successfully divided and distributed as uniform streams of liquid by the use of the device described herein. In some instances the wettability of liquids and the uniformity of division and distribution can be improved by adding a small amount of wetting agent to the liquid before it is supplied to tube 2|. This also tends to reduce splashing of the liquid when it strikes the outer wall of the pan since the liquid tends to spread out along the wall in the location of annular ridge l4 and other factors, as will be apparent to those skilled in the art, without departing from the spirit of the present invention. Thus the size of the devicemay be varied considerably dependingon the quantity and rate of flow of liquid which it is desired to supply to each device, reactor etc. If the amounts to be supplied are large, than larger devices are preferably employed. On the other hand, if the amounts to be supplied are small, a much smaller device can be used successfully.

The number of compartments I5 in the device may be varied considerably depending upon the number of devices, reactors, etc. to which itis desired to supply streams of liquid. Since the advantages of this device over single metering devices from an economic view point increases as the number of machines, reactors, etc. which require the supply of uniform streams of liquids are increased, it is, of course, desirable to employ a distributing device which is divided into a large number of compartments or chambers [5.

The size and shape of the partitions l6 may also be varied considerably as is evident when it is considered that the primary function of the partitions is to confine the film of liquid deposited on the outer wall to a fixed wall area and to a fixed area on the bottom surface of the pan ID before discharge throughdischarge opening H, which areas are equal in each of the compartments l5. Thus the thickness, height, configuration and to some extent the distance of the inner edge of the partitions from the center of the pan In are immaterial to the proper functioning of the device as long as the compartments have equal outer wall and bottom surface areas as described above. Of course, the partitions 16 should extend radially inward at least as far as the annular ridge I 4 in order to insure the flow of the liquid into the proper discharge opening or into the central overflow opening 20 without permitting spillage or flow into an adjacent compartment.

The annular ridge portion l4 may be spaced farther from or closer to the center of pan I0 than is illustrated in Figures 1 and 2. It is preferred, however, to locate the annular ridge portion [4 not more than midway between the outer edge and the center of the pan l0 and as close to the center of the pan ID as possible and still leave a circular area surrounding the discharge opening 20 to provide for the overflow of liquid from each compartment. Under these conditions the increment of liquid film deposited on the outer wall 12 by the rotating tube 2! travels a sufficient distance before reaching the discharge opening I! so that the subsequent increments of liquid merge with the remainder thereof and thus provide a uniform instead of pulsating flow. The discharge openings I! should always be sufliciently large to discharge the liquid as it reaches the opening otherwise the liquid tends to build up in the compartment and the rate of discharge through the opening will increase or decrease with increasing or decreasing head. Moreover, the discharge openings I! should be located immediately adjacent to the annular ridge portion I4 or at the base thereof, to prevent the accumulation of liquid between the opening and the annular ridge portion. An accumulation of liquid at this point is undesirable especially if the liquid is apt to gel or become highly viscous since it necessitates frequent cleanings and also because the fiow ot the liquid from the opening is apt to be non-uniform.

What-is claimed is:

L A liquid distributing device comprising a stationary cylindrical pan having a bottom portion and a vertically extending side wall, said bottom portion being provided with a central opening and an upstanding annular wall spaced from the center of said pan, the bottom portion of said pan including a conical portion which slopes downwardly from said side wall to said annular wall and another conical portion which sldpes downwardly from the top of said annular wall to said central opening, said pan being divided into a plurality of compartments each of which has a single discharge opening in the bottom thereof positioned immediately adjacent to and outwardly from said annular wall, said compartments being defined by said side wall, annular wall and first mentioned conical portion and by partitions which extend radially inward from said side wall, the area of'the outer wall of said compartments being equal and the areas of the bottom portions of said-compartments being equal, said partitions extending vertically upward above said annular wall whereby excess,

liquid in said compartments may flow over. said annular wall and thence into said central opening without running into other compartments, and rotating means for directing ,a metered stream of liquid against the inner surface of the side wall of said pan at constant angular velocity.

2. A liquid distributing device comprising a stationary cylindrical pan having a bottom portion and-a vertically extending side wall, said bottom portion being provided with a central opening and an upstanding annular wall spaced outwardly not more than midway from the center toward the outer edge of said pan, the bottom portion of the pan including a conical portion which slopes downwardly from said side wall to said annular wall and another conical portion which slopes downwardly from the top of said annular wall to said central opening, said pan being divided into a plurality of compartments each of which has a single discharge opening in the bottom thereof spaced concentrically from the center of said pan and positioned immediately adjacent to and outwardly from said annular wall, said compartments being defined by said side wall, annular wall and first mentioned conical portion and by partitions which extend radially inward from said side wall to some point between the central opening and said annular .wall, the area of the outer wall of said compartments being equal and the area of the bottom portions of said compartments being equal, said partitions extending vertically above said annular wall whereby excess liquid in said compartments may flow over said annular wall and thence into said central opening without running into other compartments, and rotating means for directing a metered stream of liquid against the inner surface of the side wall of the pan at constant angular velocity.

3. A liquid distributing device comprising a stationary cylindrical pan having a bottom portion and a vertically extending side wall, said bottom portion being provided with a central opening and an upstanding annular wall spaced outwardly not more than midway from the center toward the outer edge of the pan, the bottom portion of the pan including a conical portion which slopes downwardly from said side wall to said annular wall and another conical portion which slopes downwardly from the ton of said annular wall to said central openin said pan being divided into a plurality of compartments each of which has a single discharge opening in the bottom thereof spaced concentrically from the center of said pan and positioned immediately adjacent to and outwardly from said annular wall, said compartments being defined by said side wall, annular wall and first mentioned conical portion and by partitions which extend radially inward from said side wall and terminate at concentrically spaced points located inwardly of said annular wall, the area of the outer wall of said compartments being equal and the area of the bottom portions of said compartments being equal, said partitions extending vertically above said annular wall whereby excess liquid in said compartments may flow over said annular wall and thence into said central opening without running into other compartments; a curved tube extending both vertically and horizontally, the vertical axis of which is coincident with a vertical center line through the bottom of said pan and the horizontal portion of which terminates in a nozzle adjacent to the outer wall of said pan and positioned above said partitions, means for supporting and rotatdownwardly from said side wall to said annular ridge and another conical portion which slopes downwardly fromjthe top of said annular ridge to said central op'eninasaid pan being divided into compartments by equally spaced radially extending partitions. each of which extends an equal distance from the side wall toward the center of said pan, said partitions extending from the side wall to at least the top of said. annular ridge, said partitions extending vertically above the top of said annular ridge whereby excess liquid in said compartments may flow over said ridge and thence into said central opening without running into other compartments, each of said compartments having a discharge opening in the bottom thereof positioned immediately adjacent to and outwardly from said annular ridge, said discharge openings being of equal diameter and substantially as wide as the distance between the partitions, rotating means for directing a metered stream of liquid against the inner surface of said side wall at constant angular velocity, and means for supplying said rotating means with a metered stream of liquid.

' WALLACE A. BEARDSELL.

WARREN H. HAY.

REFERENCES CITED The followin references are of record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 223,034 Douglass Dec. 30,1879 442,017 Coplen Dec. 2, 1890 1,100,649 Bennett June 16, 1914

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US223034 *Oct 2, 1879Dec 30, 1879 Improvement in grain-tollers
US442017 *Dec 2, 1890 Ore distributer and sampler
US1100649 *Apr 5, 1913Jun 16, 1914Vyvyan C BennettPulp-distributing machine.
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2852309 *Jun 14, 1956Sep 16, 1958English Charles CLawen sprinkler
US4549567 *Sep 26, 1983Oct 29, 1985Horton Donelson BFluid distributor
US5333640 *May 24, 1993Aug 2, 1994Swift Steven MFlow divider to receive, split, and distribute a substance, consisting of multiple small units, being moved via flow gas under pressure into respective passageways
Classifications
U.S. Classification137/262
International ClassificationG01N1/18
Cooperative ClassificationG01N1/18
European ClassificationG01N1/18