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Publication numberUS2585138 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 12, 1952
Filing dateJan 13, 1950
Priority dateJan 13, 1950
Publication numberUS 2585138 A, US 2585138A, US-A-2585138, US2585138 A, US2585138A
InventorsLandgraf George F
Original AssigneeTrion Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Air nozzle and ionizing unit for electrostatic air filters
US 2585138 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

' Filed Jan. 15, 1950 Feb. 12, 1952 G. F. LANDGRAF 2,585,138

AIR NOZZLE AND IONIZING UNIT FOR ELECTROSTATIC AIR FILTERS 2 SHEETS--SHEET 1 HI". 1. 11h '5 nllh ll E George ELandgraf BYM al/WC- H/S ATTORNEYS Feb. 12, 1952 F. LANDGR'AF 2,585,138

AIR NOZZLE AND IONIZING UNIT FOR ELECTROSTATIC AIR FILTERS Filed Jan. 13, 1950 2 SHEETS-SHEET 2 INVENTOR.

George E Landgraf m: u 6m J HIS ATTORNEYS Patented Feb. 12, 1952 AIR NOZZLE AND IONIZING UNIT FOR ELECTROSTATIC AIR FILTERS George F. Landgraf, Pittsburgh, Pa., assignor to Trion, Inc., McKees Rocks, Pa.,

of Pennsylvania a corporation Application January 13, 1950, Serial No. 138,355

' 1 Claims. (01. 1837) This application relates to an air nozzle and ionizing unit for electrostatic air filters, particularly air filters of the type having an ionizing unit and a collecting unit which are separately mounted in a housing and which may be separately removed for purposes of maintenance and repair. The air nozzle and ionizing unit which I have invented combines in one structure a specially designed air nozzle and an ionizing unit which can readily be installed and removed from the front of the housing as a single structure. The air nozzle is designed to prevent blow-by and at the same time it provides a support for the ionizing tubes of the ionizing unit. It also carries supports for the ionizing wires which are spaced between the tubes.

In the accompanying drawings I have illustrated a present preferred embodiment of my invention, in which- Figure 1 is a plan view of my unit;

Figure 2 is a rear elevation view;

Figure 3 is a front elevation view;

Figure 4 is a section along the lines IV-IV of Figure 2;

Figure 5 is an end view;

Figure 6 is a fragmentary plan view similar to Figure 1 but on an enlarged scale;

Figure 7 is a section along the lines VII-VII of Figure 4 but on an enlarged scale; and

Figure 8 is a vertical section through one of the ionizing tubes along the lines VIII-VIII of Figure 7.

An electrostatic air filter of the type for which my invention is intended has an ionizing unit which charges solid particles carried by the air as it first enters the filter and a collecting unit which removes the charged solid particles from the air before the air leaves the filter. The ionizing unit comprises a row of tubes spaced parallel to each other across the front of the filter and a series of ionizing wires extending between and parallel to the tubes. A large potential difierence is maintained between the wires and-the tubes. The collecting unit comprises a series of plates spaced parallel to each other across the housing of the filter so that all air which enters the filter passes between the plates after it leaves the ionizing unit. A high potential difference is maintained between alternate plates, and the charged particles in the air are attracted to and remain on the plates from which they are washed at intervals. As stated above I have invented an air nozzle and ionizing unit which can be assembled in the front of the filter and removed from the unit as a single unit. This obviously facilitates maintenance and repair.

Figure 3 shows the front of my unit which comprises a rectangular frame 9, ionizing tubes 10, and ionizing wires i I. As shown in Figures 1 and 2 flanges I2 and I3 extend from the top and bottom inner edges of the frame in the direction of air flow through the unit and also slope inwardly to slightly restrict the air passage, that is, the flange I2 slopes slightly downwardly and the flange l3 slopes slightly upwardly. Flanges l4 and I5 extend in the direction of the air flow from the inner side edges of the frame and (as shown in Figures 1 and 6) also slope inwardly to slightly restrict the air flow. At a point approximately in line with the ionizing tubes N3, the flanges I4. and ['5 are curved outwardly and in effect form two additional ionizing tubes. From Figures 1 and 2 it will be noted that all of the air which enters through the frame 9 passes between tubes and wires or between the curved side flanges l4 and I5 and the wires. This avoids all blow-by. In other words, all of the particles in the air passing through the filter are subjected to the high electrostatic field maintained between the wires and the tubes. If desired a hum suppressor" l6 such as described in my copending application Serial No. 72,885 filed January 26, 1949, can be addedv to my unit to prevent howling of the ionizing wires in dry weather.

Figures 2, 4 and 5 show the structure for supporting the ionizing wires H. The frame 9 carries two insulators I! above the top flange l2 and spaced adjacent each end of the flange and two insulators l8 below the flange l3 and spaced adjacent each end of the flange. The insulators 11 support a top bar 19 which is in the form of an angle bolted to the insulators and the insulators [8 support a bottom bar 20 which is also in the form of .an angle bolted to the insulators.

The bars [9 and 20 have a series of holes spaced along their length. 8 hooks 2| are placed in the openings in the top bar 19 and a loop is formed in each ionizing wire and passed over an S hook. Small springs 22 are hooked at one end into the openings in the bottom bar 20 and the bottom of each ionizing wire is looped to engage the other end of one of these springs, the springs thus serving to hold the wires taut.

Figures 6, '7 and 8 show the structure for supporting the ionizing tubes Ill. The flanges 12 and [3 are scalloped to provide clearance for the ionizing wires. The widest portions 23 of the flanges terminate in tongues 24 which extend into slots cut in the tubes I0 and are bent over as shown in Figure 8 to lock the tubes in posi- From the foregoing it appears that my air nozzle and ionizing unit is relatively simple to construct because few assembly operations are involved. The air nozzle prevents blow-by. It also supports the ionizing tubes and wires so that the entire unitcan be installed as a unitary structure in an air filter and easily removed for maintenance and repair.

While I have described a present preferred embodiment of my invention, it isto be understood that it may be otherwise embodied within the scope of the following claims.

I claim:

1. An air nozzle for electrostatic air filters having an ionizing unit having two sets of electrodes, one set being charged oppositely to the other set comprising a rectangular frame having a rectangular opening therein, and flanges extending in the direction of air flow from the edges of the frame forming-said. opening, two flanges on opposed sides havingameans for supporting between them one set of. electrodes of the ionizing unit, the two other sides sloping inwardly from the front of the frame-and then curving outwardly at a point substantially in line with the electrodes carried by thefirst said flanges.

2. An air nozzle for electrostatic air filters having an ionizing unit having two sets of oppositely charged electrodes, one set comprising tubes, the other set comprising wires, said nozzle comprising a rectangular, frame having a rectangular opening therein,, and flanges extending in the direction of airflow from the edges of the frame forming said opening, two flanges on opposed sides having tongues adapted to extend into slots in tubes of the ionizing unit and thereby support the tubes, the two other sides sloping inwardly from the front of the frame and then curving outwardly at a point substantially in line with the tubes.

3. An air nozzle for electrostatic air filters having an ionizing unit having two sets of oppositely charged electrodes, one set comprising tubes, the other set comprising wires, said nozzle comprising a rectangular frame having a rectangular opening therein, and flanges extending in the direction of air flow from the edgesof the frame forming said opening, two flanges on opposed sides being scalloped -to provide clearance for ionizing wires of the ionizing unit, the portions of said flanges furthest from the frame terminating in tongues adapted to extend into slots in tubes of the ionizing unit and thereby support the tubes, the two other sides sloping inwardly from the front of the frame and then curving outwardly at a point substantially in line with the tubes.

4. An air nozzle and ionizing unit for electrostatic air filters comprising a rectangular frame having a rectangular opening therein, flanges extending in the direction of air flow from the edges of the frame forming said opening, two opposed flanges having means for supporting tubular electrodes of the ionizing unit, a bar mounted on the rear side of the frame adjacent each flange which supports the tubular electrodes but electrically insulated therefrom, and wire electrodes supported by the bars extending between the ionizing tubes and side flanges and parallel thereto.

5. An air nozzle and ionizing unit for electrostatic air filters comprising a rectangular frame having a rectangular opening therein, flanges extending in the direction of air flow from the edges ofthe frameforming said opening, ionizing tubes supported by 'said flanges, ionizing wires extending between and parallel to the tubes and side flanges, and supports for said wires mounted on the rear, sides of said frame but electrically insulated therefrom.

6. An air nozzle and ionizing unit for electrostatic air filters comprising a rectangular frame having a rectangularopening therein, flanges extending in the direction of air flow from the edges of the frame forming said opening, ionizing tubes extending across the frame and parallel to each other, said tubes having slots adjacent each end. two flanges on opposed sides'sloping inwardly and having tongues adapted to extend into said slots to support the tubes, ionizing wires extending between and parallel ,.to the tubes, insulators mounted on the rear face of the frame adjacent to but spaced from the flanges which support the tubes, and bars mounted on the insulators and supporting the ionizing wires.

'7. An air nozzle for electrostatic air filters having an ionizing unit one set of electrodes of which are tubes, said nozzle comprising a rectangular frame having a rectangular opening therein, and flanges extending in the direction of air flow from the edges of the frame forming said opening and sloping inwardly, two flanges on opposed sides having means for supporting between them tubes of the ionizing unit, the two other sides sloping inwardly from the frontof the frame and then curving outwardly at a point substantially in line with the tubes.

GEORGE F. LANDGRAF.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record'in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2221603 *Oct 20, 1939Nov 12, 1940Westinghouse Electric & Mfg CoMeans of charging dust at wire supports of electrical precipitators
US2225677 *Dec 29, 1938Dec 24, 1940Research CorpMethod and apparatus for electrical precipitation
US2249801 *Jan 22, 1940Jul 22, 1941Research CorpMethod and apparatus for electrical precipitation
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2660260 *Aug 10, 1951Nov 24, 1953Air Maze CorpSupport for charging electrodes for electrostatic filters
US2873000 *May 8, 1956Feb 10, 1959Elam Lowell SElectrostatic precipitator
US2875845 *Mar 18, 1955Mar 3, 1959Penney Gaylord WElectrostatic precipitator
US2900042 *Mar 15, 1957Aug 18, 1959Borg WarnerElectrical precipitator
US3373487 *Dec 6, 1966Mar 19, 1968Koppers Co IncElectrostatic precipitator electrode handling system
US3438180 *Dec 28, 1965Apr 15, 1969Trane CoAir-cleaning apparatus
US4022594 *May 2, 1975May 10, 1977Baysek Edward LElectrostatic precipitator
US4064548 *Jan 27, 1976Dec 20, 1977Burlington Industries, Inc.Means for improving ionization efficiency of high-voltage grid systems
DE19642799A1 *Oct 17, 1996Aug 14, 1997Ilt Ind Luftfiltertech GmbhElectrostatic filter ioniser construction for increased efficiency and stability
DE19642799C2 *Oct 17, 1996Sep 17, 1998Ilt Ind Luftfiltertech GmbhIonisator
Classifications
U.S. Classification96/62
International ClassificationB03C3/40
Cooperative ClassificationB03C3/40
European ClassificationB03C3/40