Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS2585458 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 12, 1952
Filing dateOct 11, 1949
Priority dateOct 11, 1949
Publication numberUS 2585458 A, US 2585458A, US-A-2585458, US2585458 A, US2585458A
InventorsGordon Julia E I
Original AssigneeGordon Julia E I
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Game apparatus for teaching the use of the multiplication table
US 2585458 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Feb. 12, 1952 J. E. 1. GORDON GAME APPARATUS FOR TEACHING THE USE OF THE MULTIPLI CATION TABLE 2 SHEETS-SHEET 1 Filed Oct. 11, 1949 [m A L. U W

207 FIEF:

A-r ran/v5 Y Feb. 12, 1952 J. E. l, GORDON 2,585,458

GAME APPARATUS FOR TEACHING THE USE OF THE MULTIPLICATION TABLE F 'iled Oct. 11, 1949 2 SHEETS-SHEET 2 FIB-5 FIE/ r Z11 PIE. E

INVENTOR. fl AM 6020001 Patented Feb. 12, 1952 GAME APPARATUS FOR TEACHING THE USE OF THE MULTIPLICATION TABLE Julia '12. I. Gordan, Bricks, N. 0.

Application October 11, 1949, Serial No. 120,770

2 Claims.

This invention relates to educational games, and more particularly to game devices for teach* ing arithmetic.

A main object of the invention is to provide a novel and improved game apparatus involving elements of skill and chance, but stimulating the players to learn the process of multiplication by requiring them to understand products and factors in order to score.

A further object of the invention is to provide an improved game apparatus embodying the use of the multiplication table as a scoring field, and of scoring pieces which are associated with the numerals of the multiplication table in such a manner as to acquaint the players with the arithmetical relationships of the various factor numerals of the multiplication table to the product numerals thereof, whereby each player rapidly becomes familiar with the multiplication table and with the factorial relationships be- P tween the various factor numerals and the product numerals thereof.

A still further object of the invention is to provide an improved educational game apparatus which may be embodied either in a table game,

a floor game, or in an outdoor field game, and which may be played by two or more players, the apparatus being adapted to rapidly acquaint the players with the use of the multiplication table and with the process of multiplication, whereby the arithmetical proficiency of the players is greatly increased and whereby the interest of the players in multiplication, and in arithmetic generally, is greatly stimulated.

A still further object of the invention is to provide an improved educational game which aids in developing the muscularcoordination and control of the players, provides entertainment, and which is arranged so that each player has substantially an equal opportunity to score.

Further objects and advantages of the invention will become apparent from the following description and claims, and from the accompanying drawings, wherein:

Figure 1 is a plan view of a playing board forming part of a game apparatus in accordance with the present invention.

Figure 2 is a top plan view of a set of playing pieces employed with the game board of Figure 1 according to one form of the invention.

Figure 3 is an enlarged elevational view, partly in cross-section, of one of the playing pieces shown in Figure 2.

Figure 4 is a top plan view of a set of playing pieces employed with the game board of Figure 1 according to another form of the invention.

Figure 5 is a top plan view of a set of playing pieces employed with the game board of Figure 1 according to still another form of the invention.

Figure 6 is a transverse vertical cross-sectional view taken through a modified form of playing piece which may be employed with the game board of Figure 1.

Figure 7 is an elevational view of a mallet which may be employed as a driving means. for playing pieces when the apparatus is employed as a floor game or as an outdoor field game.

Referring to the drawings, and more particularly to Figurel, 2E1! designates a board which may be of any suitable shape, and is illustrated merely by way of example as being square. The board 295 is marked adjacent its margins with lines shown at 262 and 203, either the lines 202 or the lines 223 being employed as starting lines for the playing pieces, as will be subsequently described.- Marked centrally on the board 21]! is a conventional multiplication table, designated generally at 2M. As shown in Figure 1, the multiplication table 2% has a top row comprising the factor numerals l to 12 and also its left side row comprising said factor numerals. Aligned with the factor numerals in the well known manner are the various product numerals of the multiplication table.

Referring now to Figure 2, a set of playing pieces 2435 is illustrated, said playing pieces comprising twelve annular rings of any suitable material, such as plastic or the like, said rings being inscribed with the respective factor numerals 1 to 12 of the multiplication table. In the arrangement of Figure 2, the rings 205 are'all of the same size. The rings carry their numerical markings on their top surfaces as wellas on'their side surfaces.

In playing a game, each player is given an equal number of playing pieces 265. The game may'therefor'e be played by as many as twelve players. Assuming, for example, that there are six players, each player is given two playing pieces. The first player places one of his. playing pieces on the marginal portion of the playing board' just outside a line chosen as the starting line, for example, the starting line 202. The player then snaps the playing piece from its starting position onto the multiplication table 285 and attempts to encircle a numeral of the table of which the numeral carried by the playing piece is a factor. When this is done, the player scores a number of points equal to the number encircled. For example, assume that the player has the playing piece marked '7. On the first try, .the

playing piece encirclesthe number 353' Since 7 is a factor of 35, the player receives a score of 35 points. If the playing piece fails to encircle any number or encircles a number in which 7 is not a factor, then the player receives no score. The first player then repeats the attempt using the other playing piece. Since the other playing piece carries a different factor numeral, for example, the numeral 9, the player seeks to ring a number on the multiplication table 204 in which this latter factor numeral is a factor. Upon so doing, the player receives an additional score equal to the number successfully encircled. Thus, assume that the player rings the number 72 with the ring marked 9. The player then receives a score of 72 points in addition to the points, if any, scored in the first try.

The next player then proceeds, repeating the above process but using the playing rings allotted to him. The third player thereafter proceeds in the same manner, and so on. The game continues until one of the players has scored a predetermined total of points, for example, a total of 500 points. This player is then declared the winner of the game.

Each player has an equal number of playing pieces 205. Since it is desirable for all the playing pieces to be used in the game, so that all the factor numerals 1 to 12 of the multiplication table will be used by the players, the game may be played by two, three, four, six or twelve players.

Numerous variations in the rules of the game are possible. In a typical variation, each player is allowed to select two of the playing pieces. He may play either ring twice or may play both rings once. Each player is allowed two trials on each round. As above described, the player pushes or snaps the ring from the starting line with one or two fingers and aims at a multiple of the number carried by the ring used. If the ring slides over the board and stops in a position encircling a number which is a multiple of the number on the ring, the player writes the number encircled on a score pad. For example, assume that player A has the rings numbered 12 and 1. Player A first used his ring numbered 12. The rin slides over the board and stops, encircling the number 66. He writes 60 under A on the score pad. Next he uses the ring numbered 1 and scores 7. He then writes 7 under the 60 and his turn is completed. Assume player B uses the rings numbered 2 and 11. Player B uses the ring marked 2 and it stops, encircling the number 49. He cannot score, since 49 is not a multiple of 2. Player B then uses the ring marked 11, which stops in a position encircling the number 72. Again the player B cannot score, because 72 is not a multiple of 11. Player B has thus completed his turn without scoring. The

next player then uses his rings, and so forth. At

the completion of one round, the players g0 through a second round, repeating the above procedure. The first player whose score adds up to 500, or some other designated total previously agreed upon, wins the game.

Players may exchange their positions but must play the rings originally allotted to them.

The playing board may be imprinted on a table cloth, such as a plastic table cloth, whereby the game may be played on a suitable table, such as a dining table, around which the players are seated.

Alternatively, enlarged markings such as shown on the board of Figure 1 may be provided on a floor, the playing rings being proportionately enlarged, and mallets, such as shown at 206 in Figare 7, may be employed to propel the playing rings. Similarly, the enlarged board markings may be inscribed on an outdoor playing field and the game may be played with enlarged playing rings, employing mallets such as illustrated in Figure 7.

As shown in Figure 3, the lower peripheral edges of the playing rings may be bevelled, as shown at 201, to facilitate the sliding of the rings over the playing surface.

The playing board may be inscribed on a floor covering such as a linoleum rug, the markings being suitably enlarged, and the playing rings being proportionately enlarged, as described above. In playing the game, mallets such as shown in Figure 7 may be employed to propel the rings or the rings may be shoved or pushed with the toe of the players shoe.

Figure 6 illustrates an alternate form of playing piece, shown generally at 208. Said playing piece comprises a transparent central portion 209 and an opaque outer ring portion 210. The opaque outer ring portion is preferably bevelled at its lower peripheral edge, as shown at 21 I.

It will be apparent fro man inspection of the multiplication table that the different playing pieces will have different scoring possibilities, since, in general, the lower numbered playing pieces will find more multiples on the multiplication table than the higher numbered playing pieces. The following table shows the number of scoring positions for the respective playing pieces:

Scoring To equalize the scoring possibilities of the various playing rings, the rings may be made of gradually increasing size, as shown in Figure 4, the ring numbered 1 being smallest and the ring numbered 12 being largest. The inside diameter of the smallest ring, indicated at 2l2, may be such that the ring 2 [2 may just barely encircle the largest number on the multiplication table, whereas, the largest ring, shown at 213, may have an inside diameter almost twice that of the ring 212.

An alternative arrangement for equalizing the scoring possibilities of the different rings is shown in Figure 5. From the table given above, it will be seen that the first four rings have a relatively large number (from 144 to 72) of scoring possibilities. In Figure 5, these rings, shown at 214, are made relatively small in size. The next two rings, numbered 5 and 6, have an intermediate number of scoring positions, namely, 44. These rings, shown at H5 in Figure 5, are of substantially increased size as compared with the rings 2 M. The last six rings, numbered from 7 to 12, have the lowest number of scoring posie tions, namely, 23. These last six rings, shown at 2 [6 in Figure 5, are therefore made of maximum size, and may have inside diameters almost twice as large as those of the rings M4. The inside diameters of the intermediate rings 2l5 are approximately one and one half times as great as those of the rings 2M.

By employing the arrangement of either Figure 4 or Figure 5, the scoring chances of the respective players are substantially equalized and the ability of a player to obtain a winning score will depend mainly on the players dexterity and skill.

The general result of the game is to give each player an intimate familiarity with the multiplication table and to greatly increase the ability of each player to make mental multiplications and divisions.

While certain specific embodiments of an educational game apparatus have been disclosed in the foregoing description, it will be understood that various modifications within the spirit of the invention may occur to those skilled in the art. Therefore it is intended that no limitations be placed on the invention except as defined by the scope of the appended claims.

What is claimed is:

1. In a game apparatus of the character described, the combination of a plane playing surface inscribed with a substantially square multiplication table, the digits of all the numerals on said table being substantially equal in physical size, and a set of playing pieces slidable on said playing surface, the playing pieces being equal in quantity to the quantity of factor numerals in a marginal row of said multiplication table which begins with the numeral 1, and the playing pieces being consecutively inscribed with said factor numerals of the multiplication table, said playing pieces having opaque margins arranged to at times completely surround the numerals on the multiplication table and defining openings to allow the numerals to be viewed from above through the playing pieces, the playing pieces varying in physical size in acccordance with the magnitude of the factor numeral inscribed thereon, and the size of said openings likewise varying in the same manner, allowing numerals of large physical size on the playing surface to be encircled by the large playing pieces with substantially the same order of facility as that with which the numerals of small physical size on said surface can be encircled by the small playing pieces.

2. In a game apparatus of the character described, the combination of a plane playing surface inscribed with a substantially square multiplication table, the digits of all the numerals on said table being substantially equal in physical size, and a set of playing pieces slidable on said playing surface, the playing pieces being equal in quantity to the quantity of factor numerals in a marginal row of said multiplication table which begins with the numeral 1, and the playing pieces being consecutively inscribed with said factor numerals of the multiplication table, said playing pieces having opaque margins arranged to at times completely surround the numerals on the multiplication table and defining openings to allow the numerals to be viewed from above through the playing pieces, the playing pieces bearing small factor numerals being relatively small in physical size and the playing pieces bearing large factor numerals being relatively large in physical size, the sizes of the openings in the respective playing pieces likewise being relatively small for the playing pieces bearing small numerals and being relatively large for the playing pieces bearing large numerals, allowing numerals of large physical size on the playing surface to be encircled by the large playing pieces with substantially the same order of facility as that with which the numerals of small physical size on said surface can be encircled by the small playing pieces.

JULIA E. I. GORDON.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 445,016 Greene Jan. 20, 1891 491,293 Monks Feb. 7, 1893 535,535 Gardner Mar. '12, 1895 846,110 Jurick Mar. 5, 1907 1,217,908 Brewer Mar. 6, 1917 1,470,872 Ovenshire Oct. 16, 1923 1,719,108 Fennell July 2, 1929 1,935,308 Baltzley Nov. 14, 1933 2,073,551 Crasnoff Mar. 9, 1937 2,410,845 Snell Nov. 12, 1946 2,472,439 Rogers June 7, 1949

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US445016 *Nov 6, 1890Jan 20, 1891 Mary a
US491293 *Feb 7, 1893 Game-board
US535535 *Mar 16, 1894Mar 12, 1895 Game apparatus
US846110 *Nov 27, 1906Mar 5, 1907George H JurickGame apparatus.
US1217908 *Feb 21, 1914Mar 6, 1917Charles B BrewerGame apparatus.
US1470872 *Feb 21, 1922Oct 16, 1923Orson A LovejoyEducational game appliance
US1719108 *May 23, 1927Jul 2, 1929Eleanor FennellGame for teaching multiplication
US1935308 *Jul 17, 1930Nov 14, 1933Baltzley Louis EGame counter
US2073551 *Nov 4, 1935Mar 9, 1937Crasnoff Victor NCounting device
US2410845 *Jul 20, 1944Nov 12, 1946SnellToken
US2472439 *Oct 5, 1945Jun 7, 1949Rogers Alban EDevice for teaching arithmetic
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2651521 *Apr 11, 1950Sep 8, 1953George F WalesGame piece with punch
US2670208 *Apr 11, 1950Feb 23, 1954George F WalesLight transmitting checker piece
US2752158 *Oct 28, 1954Jun 26, 1956Helen BrunotGame apparatus
US2825566 *Aug 1, 1955Mar 4, 1958Stutzner Harold CRing game
US2871581 *Aug 1, 1956Feb 3, 1959George P GuzakMathematical game
US3206210 *May 28, 1964Sep 14, 1965Bard GeorgeCylinder enclosed ball sliding game piece
US3947035 *Nov 11, 1974Mar 30, 1976Lawrence Peska Associates, Inc.Pool disc game
US4082279 *Jun 17, 1976Apr 4, 1978Mcfadden Robert LPhonemic word game method
US4146228 *Sep 13, 1976Mar 27, 1979Laciste Benflor ASliding counter game board with arcuate peripheral walls
US5688126 *Jan 3, 1996Nov 18, 1997Merritt; Matthew W.Arithmetic game
US6695618 *Jul 16, 2001Feb 24, 2004Victor N. DonnMultiplication game
US7997902Feb 19, 2008Aug 16, 2011Andrew John HayesEducational device
US8360780 *Jan 29, 2013Barton Lyndon OMethod and system for creating a multiplication and division puzzle
US20070255780 *Feb 8, 2007Nov 1, 2007Barton Lyndon OMethod and system for creating a multiplication and division puzzle
US20100062404 *Feb 19, 2008Mar 11, 2010Andrew John Hayeseducational device
US20130184041 *Jan 11, 2013Jul 18, 2013Lyndon O. BartonMethod and system for creating a multiplication and division puzzle
Classifications
U.S. Classification273/126.00R, 434/209, 473/588, 473/589
International ClassificationG09B19/02
Cooperative ClassificationG09B19/02
European ClassificationG09B19/02