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Publication numberUS2585663 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 12, 1952
Filing dateApr 13, 1948
Priority dateApr 13, 1948
Publication numberUS 2585663 A, US 2585663A, US-A-2585663, US2585663 A, US2585663A
InventorsRichard Laubly
Original AssigneeRichard Laubly
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Slingshot
US 2585663 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Feb. 12, 1952 R. LAUBLY SLINQSHOT.

Filed April 13. 194s 4 20a x0 /5 2da ATTRNEL/,J'

.sueh'eorneetienziand :f ri.

Patented Feb. 12, 1952 UNITED STATES FICE 1' This. invention relates to improvements in projectilethrowingl assemblies, colloquially` known as Sjlingshotf` 4hDevices of this, type generally operate under catapultv principles piaeirie the missile under tension conditions and then releasing thetensienfsuddeniyte cause; advance. et the missile- The practice is Weil-istiewri and is pla-eed in service in; the form. of crude hand-made assemblies of youthiul days; as Welt, aS `in the more elaborate developments which have. been. contemplated for .theffservieethe latter, howeveixeeemirlgly receiyirie but smaii-eemmereiai standing, possibly due to the expensive nature of the attempted fierelepments.

- `present ini/entier. is .ieeisried` te preduee an. assetti.tiri4 0f this type which.; is. Simiile and reasonably inexpensive, but which is eiElcientin serree,, i1irab1e in eerietriietierl, and which presente oi thel eharaeteristies ef the slings shot.v of; youthiui memeries- Specifically, the irivention presents certain details of construction which enable the assembly t be used With greater aecuraerL lees danser t0 theusert and which is ei long-life characteristic;

To vthese and other ends, therefore, the nature er which will be more readily understood as. the viriveriten' is hereinafter dieeised., Said'inventien consists theY improved vconstructions and combinations` of parts, hereinafter 4more I JarticularlyI described in detail,` illustrated in the accompanyingrdrawin'g, and more particularly set forth in Vthe ap'pended claims# ""1 n' In the accompanying drawings in which similar? reference: characters indicate similar Aparts in each of the views: l f

lflFigure l isa perspective view showing one formof the assembly; i. 1 YFig; ;2 Iis an'elevation, partly in section, ofr the formshown in Fig'l. n p

Fig. A3l is-a view in elevation showing a modi-,- fledzform off handle` element; ,Y a

seitig-.s454 is a sectional view taken on line 4,,-.4

5 is a crossesection of one form of elastic element; f ,i

6- is a cressfsectionai viewofy another QIHJ; Orf-'the elastic element;l .i Y

- is a detail view, in elevation of one form @freuen which-,may be used; l

Bis across-.sectional view taken on line EigiaQiSa-'detail perspective View showing one way etseeuring'the elastiieto the pouch:

Fie-1101s a simiiar'vieweof-a different form. 0f

s Fia 11; is a View ai, iriediiieti` ferm ef the elastic element. e, ,Y i

A eiirieshetiseerierally termed with three ele.- meritav aerieid banale.t a teneri which, carries.` the missile, and, theieiastie element through which the power is obtained; in the crude hand-made feriti riir-eiithi,l thel handle-Was generally a. forked stick-,With String eeuredtathelends 0i theztork aruhberband te .i each strina. with the poteri; se: eured'd-ireetto .the bands! or. eetmeeted thereto be additionalstririaseetiensi.. Ine vieethe-missiteii/as` placed4 11.1 thefpeueh, grasped `by one Irlandy whiietiie ether `grasped the handle; the pouch 'vias thenr` drawii4 rearward placing the bands. under teneieri, anti th, suddenly released te diseiiareeithe, naiss/ile;Wiiitiiiv specli betweenl the fork'shoffthe handle. The accuracy of the shot tienersleti pertiailx lipari' theyskili ei' theuser, and 'pi ir.. upon thedesree, ef"'perfeetieri with whiiehfthe devise matie present .invention iS an emulation 0f Sueh GllflClQ hairldmilSt/Tllwref btlfpmed in Such way as'to provide toratccuracy'in use, relatively lere-liteirassweii as .aereasedi DO Wer eenditiens these results being `securedl through; the particular structure of? the Slingshot.` yTo obtainaccuracy andlong-life; 'thehapdlef is -g-iven a particular shapegdesignedgto aid aiming- -the structure and to eliminate undue strainsyfln addition;` the elastic; mtansisV so arranged` as to practically assure equal --tension inthe two flights which' extend- -from the--pouch; inV addition, the structure of^-the-elastic mansis-*such as ltopermit the user to' provide la` :desired: tensioning-length within convenient arms'r'each and at-the same time pre- -vent therfstretchiromfexceeding the elastic limits ofethe elastic means, th-us.=preventingdeterioration through strainingthe means.

is\'wel1known; avstrip er,y length of rubber can fbei stretched mand` 1; whenreleased Awill return to. normal-condition as Alongas the yextent of thefstretch does l'not reachi'the. elastic limit of the 2rubberlo-the length; AIf the limit is reached or exceeded, thestripfoivlengthis itselfincreased so that it.doesnot'resumeitslinitiallengtn f Obf viously', the greater the length ofthe rubber strip,

the `greater: becomes-2 the-possible :lengthtiof .the

stretehfbeforesthe elastic limit is reached,rsince vthe 'permissible fstretch'is generallypusimilar in successive@incrementsV of' .the .length rof ithe= strip so. i ,thatras Vthe: flength isf' increased: 'by :additional increments itheitQtality-.of permissible stretch is increased correspondingly. z w .,I-Iovlever; .whilefsuchi: increased length thus preventsaexceeding the:@elasticalimit;- the increased lensthiznmvidesf themssitilitrtoi increased pliability of damage Where the assembly is of a type where the length extends into different planes, especially where the change is sudden or sharp. For instance, a bend over which the length extends, if abrupt, can seriously affect the conditions, since the stretch conditions can become localized and thus place a zone of the strip length under stretch conditions which materially or greatly exceed the elastic limit, even to an extent sufficient to snap the strip within such zone. This action is due to the fact that the stretch conditions are not permitted to pass uniformlyy breakage.

The present invention is designed to'meet these conditions by assuring an adequate length of stretch within the elastic zone without danger of reaching the elastic limits of the zone. This invention also provides for uniform stretch conditions on opposite sides of the line of flight of the missile to assure flight of the missile in a true course. In addition, the structure includes a number of other features which, combined with the above, tend to provide for accuracy in service, as well as a long life to the assemblage.

For the purpose of illustrating the invention two general forms are shown, these differing in details mainly inV vconnection with the handle member of the assemblage. In both ofthe forms,

at the ends of the crotch. While the tubular element is shown as having various bends, all of these are provided in the form of curvatures which merge so thatwhile the tube presents a shaped conguration, the interior of the tube presents no abrupt bends, the effect being that of l a continuous and smooth channel from one end to the other.

One of the fundamentals of this construction, common also in the companion form presently described, is the fact that the end Zones of the tubular element are .projected out of the main general plane of the element, the projection being approximately in the direction of pull of the pouch of the assembly, the projected portions of the element being connected with its main portions by smoothly curved sections avoiding the presence of an abrupt bend. The free open Vends of the element thus face in the direction of pull of the pouch. Since the elastic zones extend Yto such open ends, thus locating the line of flight,

. it can be understood that the projections provide an aid in aiming theassembly, and provide the additional and important condition that the elastic zones can be elongated during the pulling actionl Withoutplacing any material lateral strain on the material of the zone even when the user varies the line of sight by raising or lowering the pouch, so that strain localization is absent. When the pouchis released, the return of the zone to its normal condition is directly toward such open ends of the crotch zone.

While the elastic zone of this form may be secured to the element in either of several different ways, the preference is to provide an elastic zone formation in the form of a continuous length of elastic element |16, preferably rubber tubing, the ends of which are secured to the pouch in suitable manner, the elastic element length extending through the interior of the tubular handle element, thus placing the elastic zone as not only exposed beyond the element but also extending into and through the element itself. As is apparent, this provides an elastic element of considerable length and subject to elongation throughout its length; in other words, when pulling on the pouch, the elongation reaches to each of the increments found in such length, and since the tubing is free Within the element, the elongation is equal in all of the increments, a condition which assures self-equalizing of the combined zones, the tension on each side of the line of flight being completely equalized, and assuring true flight conditions. Due to the length referred to, the elastic limit of the zone cannot be reached by the activities of a single user, the length of pull required to reach the elastic limit would have to be increased to such an extent as to be beyond arms length of the user.

If desired, the lower or handle zone [5a may be reinforced by suitable clamps I1 to thereby tend to prevent inequality in the position of the crotch ends.

In the form shown in Figs. 3 and 4, the handle is shown as of composite'structure as compared with the unitary form of Figs. 1 and v2. For instance, the handle zone may be made up of a, pair of sections I8 mated on their opposing faces, with the sections secured together, for instance by screws Ia. Portions of the mating face yformations include curved recesses which are adapted to receive a tubular element 9 which is arcuately curved lengthwise and which, in position, is designed to produce the crotch zone of the handle. As in the form of Fig. 1, the tubular element i9 is designed to receive the enclosed portion of the elastic zone formation in the continuous form indicated at I6.

A desirable feature of both of these forms is presented in the form of the end zones of each of the two arms of the crotch zone as above explained. As shown in Figs. 1 and 4, such end zone is in the form of a curved projecting por,- tion 20, the curvature serving to shift the axis of the open end of the arm through an angle of approximately 90 to the general plane of the handle. In addition to the curvature, the end zone is so related to such general plane as to be projected from such plane in the direction of pull of the pouch of the assemblage in service, and as a result the open ends of the arms face in the direction of such pull. To prevent damage to the element I6, such open ends of the arms are flared at 20a or otherwise prepared so as to avoid the presence of any sharp edges or the like such as could injure the elastic structure.

As a result of this particular arrangement of the crotch zone in both forms, it is apparent that the curvature of the end zone inherently changes the direction of the element I6Y from the main plane of.- the handle to. the direction fromwhicli the pull is being exerted', doing. .this Withoutpla ing' any localizing strain'upon the element IIS. Hence, when the pullis being made, it is similar to drawing the element directly from the opening and in alignment with the axis, of the opening. This aids in assuring accuracy in the aiming ofthe assemblage, and in addition, the elongation of theelement is free to extend into each of the increments of thefelement since the curvature effects of the handle prevent-the presence of any condition which would tend to localize the point of pulling strain;- hence, the entire length of the element IB is available to provide for the elongation, thus assuring'against the possibility of approaching' the elastic limits of the element I6. And when the pouch is released to sped the missile on its flight, the contraction of the exposed flights of the element is in the direction of the open ends ofthe end zones, 'while the remainder of the contraction takes place within the handle itself, all without likelihood of damage to the element I6.

While the use of the continuous element I6 is preferred, in order that the self-equalizing conditions be active, it will be understood that the invention'is not limited in this respect. For instance, the element I6 could be arranged for an anchored condition at a mid-point in the direction of length of the handle channel. While the element, in such cases, would still be continuous structurally, itwould, inr operation, be equivalent to an individual element for each f thev two flights, since the elongation of a flight side would then be limited to the half length of the element.

vSuch change would tend to reduce the selfequalizing abilities of the preferred form and limit the action to the llight sides individually. In addition, it would reduce the length to which the elongation could extend and possibly cause a nearer approach to the elastic limit. However, the arrangement would give approximate, uniformity of tensile action, since the continuous element I6 would present uniform structural characteristics.

The invention contemplates carrying the conditions just described to a point where the two flights of the elastic zone formation are made individual, structurally as well as operationaly, this being made possible by anchoring the handle ends of the flights within the end zones 20. Such structure reduces the self-equalization condition and the zone of elongation practically to the exposed flight, and tends to require matching selection of elements to produce uniformity of tensile values in the two flights, while the decrease in length tends to bring the elongation closer to the elastic limit.

Both of these changes are deemed to be within the broader aspects of the present invention, since in each of the changed forms, the shape of the crotch zone of the handle is maintained, the change being simply in the length of the elastic element being employed. However, the greater efficiency is provided by the use of the preferred structure, shown in Figs. 1 to 4, and described in detail above.

The elastic element may bein the form of elastic tubing, as in Fig. 5, but may omit the hollow core zone, as indicated in Fig. 6, the latter presenting a solid form of rubber elastic IIa, which may be preferred in some cases.

'I'he elastic element may be secured to the pouch 22 in various ways. For instance, in Fig.

9 thev pouch is shown as. formed with an end.

opening 22a`through which an end offelement I6 is passed, andthen secured by a wrapping of suitable material such as latex tape 23. In Fig. l0,y the end is secured by a metalclip 24 instead of by tape. In Figs. 7 and 8, the pouch is of com--l posite form, made of vulcanizable material, the elastic element being inserted between plies and vulcanized to form a continuous structure with the pouch. In the general case the pouch may be vulcanized tothe element I6 midway between its ends as illustrated in Fig. '7. The assembly I6', 22 may then have one of its ends passed clear through the tube I5 or I9, taped or otherwise connected to its other end, and the connected ends drawn back intothe tube to its approximate center. It will be understood, of course, that 4where the element I6 is beingassembled at the manufacturing point, it may be threaded through the tube I5' or I9, and its ends thereafter vulcanized between the plies 22 to form a continuous ring, rather than employing the structure'of Fig. 7.v

As will be understood, the assemblage thus 17, provided, in either of its forms, provides a device of this type which is neat and attractive'in appearance, capable of accurate aiming in service, powerful in action, eicient in operation, durable in construction, and is so formed as to offer little opportunity of becoming snarled, since only the actual flights of the elastic' zone are exposed' and these provide for linear directions of length. The absence of sharp bends or angles in the handle prevent any tendency of the elastic zone to kink .as within the handle zone and assures long life to thedevice, since inthe preferred form, the creeping effects produced within the handle by the elongation of the elastic zone do not tend to set up excessive wear due to the absence of abrupt bends which would tend to localize the strains.

As a result, the structure is of simple but highly eicientformation and capable of elfcient action over extended periods. The simplicity of the structure permits ready substitution of elastic zone elements should gradual wear render substitution essential.

The elastic member may, if desired, be made of a plurality of strands and this may be intertwined to form a braid |61) as shown in Fig. 1l.

Variations and modifications may be made within the scope of this invention, and portions of the improvements may be used without others.

I claim:

l. A Slingshot assemblage comprising a handle element including a crotch formed by a pair of arms, a pouch, and an elastic zone formation connecting the pouch and the arms and with said zone formation presenting elastic flights symmetrically disposed on opposite sides of and spaced from a missile line of flight extending through a mid-zone of the crotch, the handle element being a rigid structure and presenting a hollow smoothly curved channel therethrough between the ends of the arms and internally of the handle element and within which the elastic zone formation flights extend a substantial distance.

2. A Slingshot assemblage comprising a handle element including a crotch formed by a pair of arms, a pouch, and an elastic zone formation connecting the pouch and the arms and with said zone formation presenting elastic nights symmetrically disposed on opposite sides of and spaced from a missile line of flight extending through a mid-zone of the crotch, the handle element being a rigid structure and presenting a hollowf vsmoothly curved channel therethrough between the ends of the arms to thereby permit thezone formation nights to extend internally of the handle, the elastic zone formation extending Vthroughout the length of such hollow channel in addition to the exposed flights to thereby provide the formation as a continuous elastic zone extending from the pouch to and through the handle element, and back to the pouch.

3. A Slingshot assemblage comprising a handle element including a crotch formed by a pair of arms, a pouch, and an elastic zone formation connecting the pouch and the arms and withV said zone formation presenting elastic flights symmetrically disposed on opposite sides of and spaced from a missile line of night extending through a mid-zone of the crotch, the handle element being a rigid structure and presenting a hollow smoothly curved channel therethrough between the ends of the arms to thereby permit therzone formation nights to extend internally of the handle, the elastic zone formation extending throughout the length of such hollow channel in addition to the exposed flights to thereby provide the formation as a continuous elastic zone extending from the pouch to and through the handle element, and back to the pouch, the elastic zone formation being free from localized re element including a crotch formed by a pair of' arms, a pouch, and an elastic zone formation connecting the pouch and the arms and with said zone formation presenting elastic nights symmet- -rically disposed on opposite sides of and spaced from a missile line of night extending through ,in

a mid-zone of the crotch, the handle element having a grip in the form of a depending extension of said crotch, said handle element includ- 8 ing a tubular portion carried by the grip, forming the crotch arms and presenting a hollow channel through the portion between the open ends of the arms, the zone formation nights extending internally of the vhandle a substantial distance.

5. A Slingshot comprising a piece of tubing bent to form a loop constituting a hand-grip and having its ends bent to form crotch arms, and an elastiic band extending in continuous form through said tubing, issuing from the ends thereof in two lengths, and a pouch secured to the free ends of said lengths.

6. A Slingshot comprising a piece of tubing bent to form a loop constituting a hand-grip and having its ends'bent to form crotch arms, and a band of tubular rubber extending in continuous form through said tubing, issuing from the ends thereof in two lengths, and a pouch secured to the free ends of said lengths.

RICHARD LAUBLY.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the nle of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 225,510 Curtis Mar.` 16, 1880 599,747 Stoddard Mar. 1, 1898 1,277,701 DePass Sept. 3, 1918 1,375,776 Buys Apr: 26, 1921 1,419,682 Miles June 13, 1922 1,767,968 Detzel June 24, 1930 2,009,319 James July 23, 1935 2,026,199 Virneburg Dec. 31, 1935 2,443,408 Walker June 15, 1943 FOREIGN PATENTS NumberV Country Date 12,046 Great Britain 1890 164,661 Great Britain June 16, 1921

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US225510 *Mar 16, 1880 Catapult
US599747 *Oct 21, 1896Mar 1, 1898 Worden e
US1277701 *Jan 18, 1918Sep 3, 1918Addison R De PassSling-shot.
US1375776 *Jan 25, 1921Apr 26, 1921Buys Henry DToy catapult
US1419682 *Feb 8, 1922Jun 13, 1922Miles George BShot-putting sling
US1767968 *May 25, 1929Jun 24, 1930Lynn DetzelParachute
US2009319 *Nov 5, 1934Jul 23, 1935James Floyd DToy
US2026199 *Mar 29, 1934Dec 31, 1935George VirneburgToy catapult
US2443408 *May 28, 1946Jun 15, 1948Walker William LSlingshot
GB164661A * Title not available
GB189012046A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2596870 *Jul 24, 1950May 13, 1952Sanderson Earlie CRepeating magazine slingshot
US2645217 *Jul 18, 1950Jul 14, 1953George F MeyerCrotch type arrow projector
US3494346 *Sep 13, 1967Feb 10, 1970Yount Edna CSlingshot with grooved end support arm for elastic propelling means
US4265212 *Jan 18, 1978May 5, 1981Weber Tackle CompanyHand catapult
US4332230 *May 5, 1980Jun 1, 1982Lozier Leroy PDynamic action high power slingshot
US8794223 *May 6, 2012Aug 5, 2014James E HarrisLaminated pocket slingshot with metal core
US20120279482 *May 6, 2012Nov 8, 2012Harris James ELaminated pocket slingshot with metal core
Classifications
U.S. Classification124/20.1, 124/16
International ClassificationF41B3/02, F41B3/00
Cooperative ClassificationF41B3/02
European ClassificationF41B3/02