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Publication numberUS2585997 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 19, 1952
Filing dateFeb 26, 1948
Publication numberUS 2585997 A, US 2585997A, US-A-2585997, US2585997 A, US2585997A
InventorsHenry Bruewer
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Faucet spout
US 2585997 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Feb. 19, 1952 H. BRuEwl-:R

FAUCET SPOUT Filed Feb. 26, 1948 INVENTOR. HENRY Bm/WER Patented Feb. 19, '.1952

UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE Application February26, 1948, Serial No. 11,170

7 Claims. 1

This invention relates to plumbing fixtures and more particularly relates to a faucet spout of improved construction and to a method of making a faucet spout.

Faucet spouts in the past have been fabricated from castings or bent pipes which have required considerable machining to form and complete, and it has lbeen a principal object of the present invention to provide an improved faucet spout fabricated from sheet metal parts.

Conventional faucets of cast metal have a rough finish requiring grinding and other finishing operations to eliminate roughness, and, in addition, rough castings often have hidden flaws which only become evident after considerable effort has been expended on a piece which must thereafter be discarded. Therefore, it has been a further object of this invention to provide a sheet metal faucet spout having smooth surfaces which require a minimum of machining.

A further object of this invention has been to provide a rm juncture between a tubular pipe fitting and a sheet metal faucet spout.

The above and other objects are attained by the means set out in the accompanyingr drawing, in which:

Figure 1 is a perspective view showing a faucet spout constructed in accordance with this invention.

prior to heating to solder the parts together.

Figure 3 is an exploded View showing the parts used to fabricate the faucet spout.

Figure 4 is a sectional view along line 4-4 in Figure 1 showing the faucet spout in completed form with the parts soldered together.

Briefly, the faucet spout of this invention may include a pair of hollow sheet metal sections soldered or brazed together to form a hollow body. One section may be slightly smaller than the other so that it can be pressed or otherwise closely fitted inside a peripheral edge of the other. The rst mentioned section may be equipped with a peripheral channel facing the peripheral edge of the other section when in assembled relation in which channel a strip or wire of appropriate hard solder may be held. The sections may be permanently and tightly joined together by heating to melt the strip or wire of solder so that it fills and seals a circumferential opening between the edges of the sections. One of the sections may be equipped with circular openings at either end to receive fittings for channelling water, or other liquid, into and out of the hollow body. Fittings may be soldered into the openings either at the time the sections of the body are soldered together or in a separate operation.

As shown in the drawing, the faucet spout may include a body In constructed from an elongated hollow upper section II and an elongated hollow lower section I 2 which t together, the lower section fitting inside a downwardly extending peripheral wall I3 of the upper section II. The -lower section I2, as shown, may have an upwardly extending peripheral wall I 1I which extends upwardly inside the wall I3. As shown in Figures 2 and 3, the wall may be bent inwardly adjacent a lower surface I6 of the section l2 to form a peripheral channel I'I' between the wall i3 and the wall I4. A wire IB of suitable hard solder may be fitted into the channel I'I before the sections II and l2 are assembled. A series of lugs IB spaced along the free edge 2l] of the wall I ll and formed by outwardly bent sections of the edge 2li may hold the wire la in place so that it cannot slip from the channel Il during assembly of the faucet spout.

The surface I5 may be equipped with spaced circular openings 2| and 22 at opposite ends for receiving a water intake 23 and outlet 2st. The water intake 23 may be a tubular member having circumferential slots 26 in its walls for rotatably attaching the faucet spout to other plumbing fixtures. A shoulder 2l near one end of the in take 23 may rest against a washer 28 which nts between the surface i@ and the shoulder 2l. A tip 29 of the intake 23 may nt through the center of the washer 23 and through the opening 2l forming a close t to receive solder. A ring 3&3 of solder may be fitted about the washer 28 when the faucet spout is assembled and, upon heating, it has been found that solder from the ring 3G can penetrate between the washer 28 and the surface l5 to the tip 29 to form a tight bond between the tip 29, washer 28, and opening 2l, which is completely water tight. The intake 23 may be mounted on the slots 25 on conventional fixtures, not shown, and the soldered joint between the inlet 23 and the body Il) may be sufnciently strong to withstand the shocks incident to rotation and use of the faucet spout.

The outlet 24 may include a tip 32 which can fit inside the opening 22 and an enlarged lower end 33 which may be threaded, as shown, to receive xtures served bythe faucet spout. Intermediate the tip 32 and the threaded end 33, a

' shoulder 34 may be located which may serve to receive a ring 35 of solder and provide a surface 3l' abutting the lower surface I6 of the lower section I4 to provide an interface for forming a tight soldered joint.

The faucet spout may be assembled conveniently in inverted position. The upper section I I may be placed with its peripheral wall I3 directed upwards. The wire I8 may be placed in the channel I'I .of the section I2 and the, wall I4 of the section I2 ttedinside the wallA I3. The section I2 may be pressed against the section II until the surface I2 is flush with the free edge of the wall I3 as shown in Figure 2. The intake 23 and outlet 24 may be set in the openings 2l 'and 22 in proper assembled relation with the solderrings 38 and 36 and the washer 28. Thenv the entire faucet spout may be heated to form all' the soldered joints in a single operation. The construction of the channel It and. the lugs :I8 `prevents the wire I8 from falling into the. hollow space between the sections, and, when the faucet is heated, the solder of the wire I8 melts and creeps into the peripheral vcrack between the sections to form a water-tight peripheral joint. At the same time the solder of the rings 30 and 36 joins the intake and outlet, respectively, to the openings 2I and 22. The solder forms watertight junctures between the parts. As shown in Figure 4, solder from the Wire I8 flows to form a circumferential juncture 39 joining the upper section II and the lower section I2. Solder from the ring 3U may flow to form a juncture 4I which ljoins the intake 23, washer 28, and opening 2| to form a Yfirm water-tight connection. In a similar manner, solder from the ring 36 forms. a juncture betweenk the outlet24 and the opening'22.

The faucet spout of this invention may be fabricated `completely from sheet metal and -turned parts requiring neither castings nor bent The upper and lower sections II and I2.

Dipemay be formed from sheet metal and may easily andk simply be formed in a drawing operation. The body I0, formed from the sections. II and I2, may be of any appropriate shape. It ishere shown tapering from the intake 23 to the outlet 24, but the shape of the body need not be limited to shapes which` can be formed lfromxbent pipe but may be formed in any desired decorative shape. The surface roughnessv and possibility of surface and hidden imperfections foundin castings isV eliminated by the use of sheet metal, for

sheet metal surfaces may be smoothso that any imperfections vmay be immediately .apparent without need .for extensive machining, to bring them out. Further,. if it is desired to lplate the surface of the faucet spout with chromiumvor other metal, the smooth sheet metal surfaces can be quickly and conveniently prepared for plating without the necessity 'for preliminary machining to eliminate surface imperfections resulting-from casting. Moreover, the interior surfaces of the body I'lll may be smooth, unlike `the interior 'surfaces of a casting, and theremay be less resistance to the fiow of water through a faucet spout constructedl in accordance Vwith this invention than is found in a cast faucet spout of equivalentsize.

It is to be understood that the parts may be joined together with various types of solder or may be brazed together. Variousmetals ymay be used in the, fabrication of the faucet vspout and various ,modifications in structural details may be resorted to. within' theY scope of the appended claims without departing :from lthe spiritof the invention.

Having described my invention, I claim:

1. A faucet spout which comprises a pair of hollow elongated trough-shaped metal sections each having closed ends and an open side, one of said sections being inverted and disposed within the peripheral edge of the open side of the other section, the peripheral edge of the inner section containing an outwardly facing peripheral channel adapted to hold a solder wire during fabrication of the faucet spout, a soldered, liquidtight juncture between said peripheral edges to fornrr an enclosed chamber between said sections, one. of said sections containing a pair of spaced openings, and an intake fixture soldered to one of said openings for introducing liquid into the chamber, the other opening being an outlet opening for discharge of liquid from the chamber.

2. A faucet spout which comprises a pair of hollow elongated trough-shaped metal sections each having closed ends and an open side, one of said sections being inverted and disposed with- 'in the peripheral edge of the open side of the other section, the peripheral edge of the inner section containing an outwardly facing peripheral channel adapted to hold a solder wire during fabrication of the faucet spout, a soldered, liquid-tight juncture between said peripheral edges to form an elongated enclosed chamber between said sections, one of said sections containing a pair of spaced openings adjacent. opposite ends of said chamber, and an intake fixture soldered to one of said openings for introducing liquid into the chamber, said intake fixture being mounted substantially perpendicular to said elongated chamber and being adapted to rotate about a vertical axis to permit the chamber to rotate in a horizontal plane, and an outlet xture soldered to the other opening to permit liquid to leave the chambei'.

3. A faucet spout which comprises a pair of hollow elongated trough-shaped metal sections each having closed ends and an open side, one of said sections being inverted and disposed within the peripheral edge of the open side of the other section, the peripheral edge of the inner section containing an outwardly facing peripheral channel for receiving a solder wire during fabrication of the. faucet spout, lugs spaced about said edge, said lugs being inclined outwardly to hold the solder wire in said channel, a soldered, liquid-tight juncture between said peripheral edges to form an enclosed chamber between said sections, one lof said sections containing a pair of spaced openings adjacent opposite ends of said chamber, an intake fixture attached to one of said openings, and an annular disc between said intake fixture and` said opening, said intake fixture having a shoulder abutting said disc and a tip extending through said disc into said opening1 said intake fixture and disc being soldered together and to the opening.

4. A faucet spout which comprises a pair of hollow elongated trough-shaped metal sections each having closed ends and an open side, one of said sections being inverted and disposed within the periphery of the open side of the other section, and a soldered liquid-tight juncture between sides and ends of said sections to form a duid-tight chamber within said sections, said sections having an inlet and an outlet adjacent the respective ends thereof.

5. A faucet spout which comprises a pair of hollow elongated trough-shaped metal sections each having closed ends and an open side, one

of said sections being mounted within the other section with its open side within said section, the side and end walls of said sections being substantially in contact, the Walls of the section within the other section containing an outwardly facing channel for receiving a solder wire during fabrication of the faucet spout, there being a liquidtight juncture of fusible metal between said sections whereby a duid-tight chamber is formed between said sections, one of said sections having in the wall opposite its open side a pair of spaced openings adjacent the respective ends of the spout, and means for connecting one of said openings to an inlet swivel xture for introducing liquid into the spout, the other opening being an outlet for discharging liquid from the spout.

6. In combination, a pair of hollow elongated trough-shaped metal sections each having closed ends and an open side, one of the said sections being inverted and being substantially co-extensive with and disposed within the open side of the other section, said sections having side and end walls substantially in Contact, the walls of the inner section containing an outwardly facing channel, and a solder wire in said channel ernbracing the walls of the inner section, the solder of the solder wire being adapted to flow between the walls of the sections when the sections are heated to a temperature at which the solder fuses.

7. In combination, a pair of hollow elongated trough-shaped metal sections each having closed ends and an open side, one of said sections being inverted and being substantially co-extensive with and disposed within the open side of the other section, said sections having side and end walls substantially in contact, the walls of the inner section containing an outwardly facing channel, and a solder wire in said channel embracing the walls of the inner section, one of said sections having a pair of spaced openings in a wallV opposite its open side adjacent the respective ends of the section, the solder of the solder wire being adapted to flow between the walls of the sections when the sections are heated to a temperature at which the solder fuses.

HENRY BRUEWER.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 896,878 Woodhouse Aug. 25, 1908 1,408,375 Manelis Feb. 28, 1922 1,924,121 Jasper Aug. 29, 1933 2,011,719 Kidd Aug. 20, 1935 2,015,246 Taylor Sept. 24, 1935 2,029,337 Parker Feb. 4, 1936 2,134,966 Boscow Nov. 1, 1938 2,306,291 Alons Dec. 22, 1942 2,323,985 Fausek July 13, 1943 2,354,611 Quarfoot July 25, 1944

Patent Citations
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US1408375 *Jan 15, 1921Feb 28, 1922Abraham ManelisHot and cold water mixer
US1924121 *Aug 18, 1930Aug 29, 1933Smith Corp A OWelded manway for pressure vessels
US2011719 *Oct 20, 1932Aug 20, 1935Kellogg M W CoArc welding method
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US2029337 *Nov 21, 1932Feb 4, 1936California Spray Chemical CorpNozzle
US2134966 *May 7, 1936Nov 1, 1938Arthur L BoscowFaucet
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US2323985 *Mar 17, 1941Jul 13, 1943Fausek Arthur JDiaphragm
US2354611 *Jun 4, 1943Jul 25, 1944Reconstruction Finance CorpFire extinguishing apparatus
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2772536 *Sep 8, 1953Dec 4, 1956Shafran Edward LWatch crown and method of assembly
US2781786 *Apr 10, 1953Feb 19, 1957Young Stephen AComposite fixture unit
US3590876 *Jan 9, 1970Jul 6, 1971Young Stephen ALavatory spout construction
US4330077 *Apr 11, 1980May 18, 1982Young Radiator CompanyMethod of soldering radiator tanks
US4484600 *Jan 27, 1982Nov 27, 1984Streamway CorporationSwivel spout construction for a faucet
US4649958 *Feb 19, 1985Mar 17, 1987Masco Corporation Of IndianaFaucet and spout construction
US4884596 *Dec 9, 1988Dec 5, 1989Stanadyne, Inc.Plumbing fixture with interior insulating and adhesive foam
US5073991 *Jan 16, 1991Dec 24, 1991501 Masco Industries, Inc.Pull-out lavatory
Classifications
U.S. Classification137/801, 228/246, 228/249, 29/890.141, 228/182
International ClassificationE03C1/04
Cooperative ClassificationE03C2001/0414, E03C1/0404
European ClassificationE03C1/04D