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Publication numberUS2587587 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 4, 1952
Filing dateOct 15, 1945
Priority dateOct 15, 1945
Publication numberUS 2587587 A, US 2587587A, US-A-2587587, US2587587 A, US2587587A
InventorsBellezza Russell G, Ruoff George M
Original AssigneeGen Electric
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Suspension insulator for hightension conductors
US 2587587 A
Abstract  available in
Images(4)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Mamh 1952 R. G. BELLEZZA ET AL 2,587,587

SUSPENSION INSULATOR FOR HIGH-TENSION CONDUCTORS Filed Oct. 15, 1945 4 Sheets-Sheet l r INVENTOR-S March 1952 R. G. BELLEZZA ET AL 2,587, 87

SUSPENSION INSULATOR FOR HIGH-TENSION CONDUCTORS Filed Oct. 15, 1945 4 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTORS A vA m/ ire/2A 25; zeg/ March 1952 R. G. BELLEZZA ET AL 2,587,587

SUSPENSION INSULATOR FOR HIGH-TENSION CONDUCTORS Filed Oct. 15, 1945 4 Sheeis-Sheet 5 35 I: INVENTORS March 4, 1952 R. e. BELLEZZA ET AL 2,587,587

SUSPENSION INSULATOR FOR HIGH-TENSION CONDUCTORS Filed Oct. 15, 1945 4 Sheets-Sheet 4 JNVENTOR5 vide. type described, each ofthe rods havingone end Patented Mar. 4, 1952 SUSPENSION INSULATOR FOR HIGH- TENSION CONDUCTORS Russell G. Bellezza and George M. Ruofi, Baltimore, Md., assignors to General Electric Company, a corporation of New York Application October 15, 1945, Serial No. 622,408

12 Claims.

vfor the usual string of suspension insulators a r plurality of insulating rods, either hollow or solid, said rods being of a length substantially equal to a string of suspension insulators, said rods being individually connected at one end to a pole or support and extending laterally therefrom and having their opposite ends connected by convenient and suitable means, said means serving as a support for the conductor.

Another object of the invention is to provide a plurality of insulating rods of adequate strength and length, said rods being each connected at one end to a support and extending laterally therefrom and having their opposite ends joined by a member, the latter being connected to and supporting the conductor.

Still another object of the invention is to substitute for the strings of suspension insulator units and the rigid supporting members therefor a vertical support having pivotally connected thereto in spaced relation and extending laterally therefrom a plurality of insulating rods (either hollow or solid), said rods having their outer ends connected to form a supporting member and being of a length sufficient to provide an adequate air gapbetween a conductor and the ground. Still another object of our invention is to provide, in connection with rods of the type described, a flexible connection for the adjacent .rod end to thereby relieve one or more of the rods of stresses other than direct tension or compression. i

'A"still further object of the invention is to provide, in connection with insulating rods of the type described, lightning arresters, fuses or like apparatus housed within the rods, if hollow, or attached to the rods, if solid, to thereby eliminate the usual complicated apparatus and mechanism heretofore used for thispurpose in connection with strings of suspension insulators, thereby using the insulating rod or tube as both a conductor support and a housing or attachment member for a piece of apparatus.

Still another object of the invention is to proin connection with insulating rods of the Gil pivotally connected to a support, a connector for their adjacent ends and to support on this connector one or more insulators of the conven tional type, the latter in turn supporting the conductor to thereby place the insulating rods in series with the conventional insulators and hence to reduce the number of conventional insulators necessary to support high tension conductors.

Still another object of the invention is to provide with insulating rods of the type described pivotal means supporting the spaced ends of the rods from the support, said means being so arranged that on the breaking of the conductor the rods will swing into a plane substantially parallel to the direction in which the unbroken portion of the conductor extends.

Still another object of the invention is to provide, in connection with insulating rods of the type described, pivotal means arranged in spaced relation on the support to which the adjacent ends of the rods are respectively connected, the pivotal means being so disposed as to cause the member connecting the outer ends of the individual rods to move upwardly from normal position (that is at right angles to the support) on a pivotal movement of the rods so that the assembly is thereby stabilized against undesired lateral motion.

Other objects of the invention will hereinafter appear in connection with the detailed description of the embodiments thereof illustrated in the accompanying drawings, in which:

Figure 1 is a side elevational view showing a support and pivotally mounted insulating rods supporting a conductor at their adjacent ends.

Figure 2 is likewise an elevational view of a slightly modified form employing three rods and a difierent form of supporting member.

Figure 3 is a side elevational view of the conductor supporting clamp illustrated in Figure 2.

Figures 4 and 5 are respectively side elevational views showing different arrangements of the insulating rods in reference to their support and in reference to the conductor, Figure 4 showing a pair of insulators in series with the insulating rods.

Figures 6 and 7 are views similar to Figure 5 illustrating the use of corrugated rods and both illustrating the use of one of the rods as a support for the distribution conductors.

Figures 8 and 9 are fragmentary cross sectional views showing the application of lightning arresters housed within one of the supporting tubes illustrated in the preceding figures.

Throughout the specification and drawings similar parts are designated by like reference characters.

Referring now to the drawings, the numeral I designates a conventional pole by which the rod insulators 2 and 3 may be supported. It is to be understood that there is no limitation as to the character of support and that the illustration of a wooden pole is merely to be taken as indicative of any type of support.

Projecting laterally from one face of the pole l is a plurality of clevis members 4 and 5, the clevis being positioned with the slot 6 in a substantially horizontal position and it will be noted that the clevis is of less length than the clevis 4 so that the pins 1 and 8, which respectively connect each clevis to the respective tongues 9 and 10 of the insulating rods 2 and 3, are out of vertical alinement, the arrangement being such that the outer ends of the pivotally connected rods 2 and 3 are swung in an ascending spiral path on either side of a normal position and thus always tend to maintain a position substantially at right angles to the direction of the conductor H which is supported at the outer ends of the rods 2 and 3, as hereinafter described.

Each rod is provided at its inner end with a cap member l2, the cap members being identical except for the extent of the tongues 9 and I0 which are of course interposed between the jaws of their respective clevis members and are pivotally connected thereto, as heretofore set forth, by the bolts 1 and 8. It will be obvious to those skilled in the art that we may substitute for the form of connection shown, a tongue extending from the support I and a clevis member extending from the caps l2. Each clevis is preferably connected to the support by means of bolts and nuts I3.

Preferably formed integral with the cap 14 secured to the outer end of the rod 2 is a member I5 in which is pivotally supported a saddle clamp 16 by means of which the conductor H is supported. The member I5 is provided beneath the cap 14 with a tongue l6a to which the clevis member I! of the cap 18 on the rod 3 is preferably pivotally connected by means of the bolt IS.

The arrangement heretofore described is illustrated in Figure '1 and it will be readily apparent that the rods 2 and 3, their respective caps l2, I4 and l8, the member l5, and the saddle l6 will be assembled at the plant or factory and that after the cap l2 of the rod 2 is connected the rod 3 is pivotally moved in reference to the pivotal connection l9 so as to bring the tongue (0 thereof into registration with the opening for the bolt 8 by means of which the cap l2 of this rod is pivotally connected to the support.

Referring now to Figure 2, in which we have illustrated the use of three rods, rather than two, as previously described, the upper rod 2a is pivotally connected to the member l5a, formed on the outer cap Ma of the rod 2, by a pin l9 extending through the jaws of the clevis l8a formed on the cap l8 and likewise the rod 3 is pivotally connected through its cap l8 with the adjacent portion of the member I511. The cap members l2 at the inner or support adjacent end of the rods are connected to the clevis members 4, 5 and 511 by the bolts, clearly shown, and each of the clevis members is connected to the support I by bolts and nuts I3.

We preferably support the conductor from the member [5a by means of a link 20, the detachable link 2| and the stirrup member or clamp 22. This stirrup member is provided with a keeper 23 which is maintained in position by a plurality of bolts and nuts 24, as is usual.

In Figures 4, 5, 6 and 7 the form of connection between the cap members l2 and the clevis members 4 and 5 is substantially identical with that illustrated and described in connection with Figure 1 and further description is believed to be unnecessary. Likewise, the clevis members are connected to the support I by bolts and nuts i3 also previously described.

It will be noted that in Figure 4 the upper rod 2, instead of extending horizontally, is arranged at an angle to the horizontal and the rod 3 extends substantially in a horizontal direction. The cap members 25 on the outer end of the rods 2 and 3 in each of the Figures 4 to 7, inclusive, are provided with extension members 26, one of which ends in a clevis 21 and the other in a tongue 28, and the members 26, and consequently the rods 2 and 3, have their outer ends connected by a bolt 29 which is also adapted to form a support either for the clamp member 23 or for the insulators 30, which in turn support the conductor clamp 23.

In Figures 5, 6 and '7 the upper rod 2 of Figure 5 and 2b of Figures 6 and 7 preferably extend in a substantially horizontal direction while the lower rod 3 of Figures 5 and 6 and 3a of Figure 7 are arranged at an angle to the horizontal. The rods 2b and 3a are preferably provided with a corrugated surface diagrammatically illustrated as atv 3! in Figures 6 and 7 and supported between certain pairs of adjacent corrugations on the rods 2b are the distribution cables 32. Tie wires, not illustrated, are preferably employed to maintain the distribution cables in position.

In Figure 7 the rod 3a is likewise provided with a corrugated surface 3| corresponding to the corrugated surface of the rods 21).

From an inspection of Figures 1, 2 and 4 to '7, inclusive, it will be seen that in each of these figures one of the insulating rods is in compression, while the other rod acts in tension and, by reason of the flexible connection at the outer end of the rods, they will have ample strength without excessive cross sectional area, to support a high tension transmission line conductor.

The flange 33 of the caps l2, l4, l8 and 25, 43 and 48 form an efficient guard to protect the insulating rods in the event of flash-over. The air gap distance between ground and the conductor is preferably as great as the usual air gap distance between the ground and conductor of a string of high tension insulators and, as shown in Figures 4, 6 and '7, additional insulator units may be employed in series with the insulating rods to more adequately protect the line against flash-over or lightning surge.

Referring now to Figures 8 and 9, we have illustrated two forms of lightning arrester. Figure 8 shows the fuse type of supporting tube; in which there is housed within the supporting tube 31) a fiber tube 34 which preferably extends the entire length of the tube 31) and within this fiber tube and connected to the cap member 25a is a conductor 35 and the cap member l2a is provided with an opening 36 through which the'hot gases generated by a flash-over will be forced.

In Figure 9 we preferably insert into one end of a supporting tube 312 a plurality of ceramic disks 31 having their opposing faces coated with a conducting substance 38, the innermost "disk 39 having a metallic conductor 40 connected thereto and the cap 12b is also provided with a conductor member 4| extending into the tube rods 2b of Figure 7, so that if desired, the distribution conductors 32 may be readily secured thereto by the usual tie wires.

Having thus described our invention, what we claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent is:

1 A suspension insulator for mounting high tension conductors on a supporting member comprising a plurality of securing means connected to said supporting member in vertically spaced relation, a plurality of rigid insulating rod means arranged in V formation, means for pivotally connecting one end of each rod to an adjacent securing means, said insulating rod means being substantially coaxially pivotal about said supporting member on an axis inclined to the vertical and means connected to the opposite ends of said rods for joining said ends, said last named means also supporting a high tension conductor supporting means and being positioned intermediate the vertical limits of said securing means.

2. A suspension insulator for mounting high tension conductors on a supporting member comprising a plurality of securing means connected to said supporting member in vertical spaced relation, a plurality of rigid porcelain insulator rods arranged in converging relationship, means for pivotally connecting one end of each rod to one of said securing means, said insulating rods, being substantially coaxially pivotal about said supporting member on an axis inclined to the vertical rigid means connected to the opposite adjacent ends of the said rods for joining said ends together, said last named means serving to maintain said rods against vertical movement, and means for directly securing a conductor clamp to said last named means.

3. A suspension insulator for mounting high tension conductors on a supporting member comprising a plurality of clevises connected to said supporting member in vertical spaced relation, a plurality of rigid insulator rods arranged in V- relationship with one rod horizontal, a metallic member connected to one end of each rod, said metallic members being adapted to be connected one to each of the said clevises, rigid means for joining the opposite ends of the said insulator rods near each other, said means serving to maintain the adjacent ends of said rods in fixed position and against vertical movement, and a conductor clamp secured to said rigid means for supporting a conductor.

4. A suspension insulator for mounting high tension conductors on a supporting member comprising a plurality of clevis members connected to said supporting member in vertical spaced relation, a plurality of rigid porcelain insulator rods, a cap member secured to one end of each rod, each cap member having a projection adapted to be connected one to each clevis, a metallic member having a plurality of sockets connected thereto, the opposite ends of said insulator rods being adapted respectively to be received one in each socket, means for securing said rods in said sockets, and means for connecting a conductor to said metallic member.

5. A suspension insulator for mounting high tension conductors on a supporting member comprising means for securing to said supporting member a pair of porcelain insulator rods in vertical spaced relation,'rigid means connected to the opposite ends of said rods for connecting said ends adjacent each other, said means serving to maintain said rods in fixed vertical relation, and a conductor pivotally connected to said last named means, one only of said rods being so arranged that the weight of said conductors maintains said rod under compression.

6. A suspension insulator for mounting high tension conductors on a supporting member comprising means for securing to said supporting member a pair of porcelain insulator rods in vertical spaced relation, rigid means connected to the opposite ends of said rods for connecting said ends adjacent each other, said means serving to maintain said rods in fixed vertical relation, and a conductor pivotally connected to said last named means, one only of said rods being so arranged that the weight of said conductor maintains said rod under tension.

7. A suspension insulator for mounting high tension conductors on a supporting member comprising a plurality of securing means connected to said supporting member in vertical spaced relation, a plurality of rigid porcelain insulator rods, means for connecting one end of each rod to one or" said securing means, and rigid means joining the opposite ends of said rods together, said last named means serving to maintain said rods against vertical movement, one of said rods being under compression and another of said rods being under tension when in operative position.

8. A suspension insulator for mounting high tension conductors on a supporting member, comprising a plurality of securing means connected to said supporting member in vertical spaced re-- lation, a plurality of rigid porcelain insulator rods, means for connecting one end of each rod to one of said securing means, and means for releasably connecting the opposite ends of said rods, said last named means being arranged to support the transmission conductor, the securing means for connecting said rods to the supporting member being disposed so as to yieldingly maintain said rods at right angles to said transmission conductor.

9. A support for mounting high tension conductors on a supporting member comprising a single insulating rod extending at right angles to the support, said rod being pivotally connected to and pivotal about said support, diagonal means pivotal with said rod for bracing said rod, and means carried by said rod for supporting a plurality of conducting cables in spaced relation.

10. A suspension insulator for mounting high tension conductors on a rigid supporting member comprising a plurality of securing means connected to said supporting member in vertical spaced relation, a plurality of rigid porcelain insulator rods, means for connecting one end of each rod to one of said securing means, means for releasably connecting together the opposite ends of said rods, at least one of said rods carrying a lightning arrester, and means for supporting a high tension conductor adjacent the connected portion of said rods.

11. A suspension insulator for mounting high tension transmission conductors on a rigid supporting member comprising a plurality of porcelain rods each hingably connected at one end to said support and forming a V arrangement,

means spaced from said hin e connections for ly of said support relative to any lower rod so that any movement of said rods from normal position will cause the connected ends of said arms to move in an ascending spiral path, and means carried by said connected ends of said .rods for supporting a transmission conductor.

12. A suspension insulator for mounting high tension conductors on a supporting member comprising an insulating rod and means for bracing said rod, said rod and means being connected at one of their ends and having their other ends pivotally attached to said supporting member in vertically spaced relation, and said rod and means beingv pivotal substantially coaxially about said support on an axis inclined to the vertical.

RUSSELL G. BELLEZZA. GEORGE M. RUOFF.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 443,508 Emmet Dec. 30, 1890 751,459 Chesney Feb. 9, 1904 809,743 Petery Jan. 9, 1906 917,785 Mershon Apr. 13, 1909 1,326,307 Thomas Dec. 30, 1919 1,458,756 Goddard June 12, 1923 1,501,732 Steinberger July 15, 1924 1,696,569 Hill Dec. 25, 1928 1,730,124 Conrad Oct. 1, 1929 2,073,519 Jackson Mar. 9, 1937 FOREIGN PATENTS Number Country Date 16,262 England of 1913 219,495 Switzerland May 16, 1942

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2812944 *Feb 23, 1955Nov 12, 1957Finch Luther ODance barre fixture
US2880954 *Jun 26, 1957Apr 7, 1959Frank Dakin DScaffold brackets
US3002043 *Dec 14, 1960Sep 26, 1961Lapp Insulator Company IncElectrical transmission system
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US8122647 *Sep 16, 2009Feb 28, 2012Korea Electric Power CorporationPower transmission tower
US20100064598 *Sep 16, 2009Mar 18, 2010Korea Electric Power CorporationPower transmission tower
US20120092118 *Oct 13, 2011Apr 19, 2012Abb Technology AgHolder for high-voltage end leads in oil transformers
Classifications
U.S. Classification174/140.00R, 174/148, 361/126, 174/161.00R, 174/158.00R
International ClassificationH02G7/20
Cooperative ClassificationH02G7/20
European ClassificationH02G7/20