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Publication numberUS2587895 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 4, 1952
Filing dateDec 31, 1947
Priority dateDec 31, 1947
Publication numberUS 2587895 A, US 2587895A, US-A-2587895, US2587895 A, US2587895A
InventorsMax Tryon, Quinn Jr Fred A
Original AssigneeMax Tryon, Quinn Jr Fred A
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Bubble blowing device
US 2587895 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

March 4, 1952 F. A. QUINN, JR, ET AL BUBBLE BLOWING DEVICE Filed Dec. 31, 1947 lNVENTORS FredAQpinn Jr. and. Max Trgon 7m ATTORNEYS.

Patented Mar. 4, 1952 BUBBLE BLOWING DEVICE Ered'A. Quinn, Jr., and Max Tryon, WashingtomD. C.

Applieation December 31, 1347, Serial No. 794,904

This invention is an apparatus for blowing bubbles.

The principal object oithe invention is to provide a bubble blower which produces a rapid and continuous succession of bubbles upon the the reservoir for containing the bubble solution,

which small bubbles, rise into the path of an air jet, which drives successive air films, supplied by the small bubbles, out, through an exit pipe, to form a rapid succession of larger bubbles. The bubbles .comingfrom the exit .pipe will vary in size, depending on the strength of the air jet, the nature of the. solution used and the dimensions of the several parts.

Another object of the invention is to provide a container serving as a reservoir for thebubble solution; two air streams are led into the container, one air stream being submerged below the level of the solution to form a large mass of small bubbles in-the container, above the liquid level therein, which small bubbles rise into the path of an air jet above the liquid level in the container, this air jet, driving successive films formed from the small bubbles, out through an exit pipe, these films forming a rapid succession of bubblesof larger size.

Another object of the invention is to provide a combined bubble blower and born; the bubble blower is mounted inside the horn; blowing into the mouthpiece of the horn serves both to sound the horn and at the same time to form and project a succession of bubbles from the horn.

More particularly, the invention comprises a container ofsuificient size to contain a substantial quantity of bubble forming solution. A branched air inlet pipe is fitted air tight into the container, one branch having its discharge openingsubmerged in the liquid, sothat a large number of air bubbles are formed, which rise through the solution, tending to fill the upper part of the container. The other branch of the air inlet pipe is formed as an air jet, opening above the liquid level, in the zone filled with,

such bubbles. This air jet picks up and entrains a succession of films, formed from such "bubbles and drives such films outwardly into the exit pipe, these films forming bubbles of various sizes, depending on the strength and g-olai s. (Cl. 4,6.-7)

size of the air jet and the nature of the solution.

The invention provides an entertaining toy, and can be used for advertising purposes.

The general features of the invention having been thus outlined, it will now be described in more detail in connection with the accompanying drawings wherein:

Fig. 1 is ,a vertical side view, partly in section, of a bubble forming device in accordance with this invention.

Fig. 2 is a view similar to Fig. 1 showing a slight modification.

Fig. 3 is, a longitudinal sectional view showing the bubble blower combined with a horn.

Fig, 4 is a vertical sectional view of another modification of the invention.

Referring now to these drawings, the bubble blowing device comprises a container 2 of any suitable material, such for example, as glass or plastic, which may be of elongated form as shown, for containing a substantial amount of bubble forming solution 4. An air pressure inlet pipe 6 is sealed into the container at 8 and is provided with a branch Ill having an exit l2 submerged in the solution, well below the liquid level therein. The upper branch M of the inlet pipe has a constricted nozzle IE opening above the normal liquid level in the container, and directed into the exit pipe [8. Exit pipe I8 could be directed at any desired angle.

In operation, when the user blows into the pipe 6, some or" the air escapes through the submerged opening l2, and as this air rises through the solution, forms a mass of relatively small bubbles 20 which substantially fills the container above the liquid level therein. These bubbles rise into the path of the air jet from l6, which entrains them and drives successive films supplied by such small bubbles, into and through exit pipe l8, forming bubbles 22 of various sizes. The operation is continuous and a steady succession of bubbles come from the exit pipe I8 as long as the air pressure is'maintained.

The reservoir may, if desired, be provided with a filling opening, but a-simpler way to replenish the supply of solution would be to immerse pipe 18 in a bubble solution and apply suction to pipe 6, or, conversely, pipe 6 could be immersed air exit opening i'l and air jet lfimay bevaried, as desired. for' varying the size of the bubbles formed in the container and the size of the bubbles escaping from exit pipe IS. The stronger Fig. l, is provided with a Venturi or similar restriction 24 of suitable size for increasing the velocity of the air jet that is directed into exit pipe I8.

Fig. 3 shows a modification of the invention, capable of use in the same way as the form shown in Fig. l, but of simpler and cheaper construction and particularly adapted to fit inside of a toy horn. In this form, a cylindrical solution con tainer 26 is provided with end plugs 28 and 30 which may be conveniently made of ordinary cork. An air inlet pipe 3!, held in place by plug 3| a, is fitted into plug 28 and is provided with a branch 32 opening below the level of solution 4 in the container. Pipe 3i is provided with a branch exit or jet opening 33 directed into one end of exit pipe 34 carried by the other plug 30. The parts just described are mounted in an ordinary toy horn 36, end plug 28 being of a size to make a substantially air-tight contact with the inside wall of the horn, air inlet pipe '3l being in the path of the blast of air coming with a small sound exit opening 40. A positioning collar 4| may be used to support the right hand end of the cylinder 26. In Fig. 3, cylindrical reservoir 2-6 could be dispensed with, by combining plugs 35 and 4! into a single right hand plug through which tube 34 is passed, and by using 28 as a left hand plug, such right and left hand plugs defining a partly conical solution reservoir between them, filled by removal of a suitable filling plug.

, In operation, when the user blows on the mouthpiece 38, some of the sound will come out of the hole 40, and air under some. pressure will pass into pipe 3| and be forced below the level of the solution 4 to form a mass of small bubbles in the upper part of the container. The air jet from 33 entrains these small bubbles and drives a rapid succession of films, supplied by such bubbles, through .exit pipe 34 to form a rapid succession of larger bubbles ea. In other words, when the user blows on the mouthpiece 38 he obtains, in addition to the usual musical note from the horn, a succession of bubbles from the largeend of the horn, thereby providing an amusing and attractive toy. V

The .hornmay be provided with a conical flanged member to provide a catch chamber 45 for catching any drip that may escape from the bubble blower itself. Any accumulation of drip may be removed by removal of drain plug 48. In the modification shown in Fig. 4, the bubble solution container 50 is provided with a snugly fitted but conveniently removable cover 52. In

this cover is mounted an air pressure inlet pipe 54 having one branch 56 opening below the level V of the solution and the other branch forming open ended exit pipe or cylinder 58, with its lower end immersed in the solution. Mounted in one wall of the pipe 58 is a smaller'exit pipe 60 having its inlet in the path of the air jet from 51 and its upper or outer end 6| opening below the top of the larger pipe 58.

In operation, when air pressure is applied to pipe 54, some of the air escapes below the level of the solution, and forms a large mass of small bubbles which tend to fill the space below the cover 52 and come into the path of the air jet from 51. These small bubbles are entrained and driven by the air jet into tube 60, and form a succession of films which travel upwardly through exit tube 60 and form a steady succession of bubbles 62 leaving exit pipe 6|. The formation of the bubbles as described is continuous, as long as pressure is applied to the pipe 54. In this form of the invention, the container may be refilled by lifting out cover 52 or by pouring solution down the tube 53. The purpose of the pipe 58 is to catch any drip or overflow from exit SI, and deliver it back into the container. Tube 58 could be omitted, if desired, and pipe 60 mounted in some other way. Pipes 6t! and 58 could be directed at any desired angle, instead of vertically, as shown.

Any suitable type of bubble forming solution may be used, as desired. Where bubbles are desired that last a long time, a substantial quantity of glycerin may be used in the solution.

By providing a steady source of air pressure to the inlet pipe and means for continuously replenishing the supply of bubble solution, the

stream of bubbles will be continuous, and could be used as an eye-catching advertisement, as in store windows, for example.

While the preferred and several embodiments of the invention have been described in detail, it should be understood that the invention is not to be limited to particular details, but maybe carried out in other ways.

We claim as our invention:

1. Apparatus for blowing bubbles, comprising a reservoir for a bubble forming solution, a bubble exit pipe carried by said reservoir, an air inlet pipe positioned in said reservoir and having its inner end submerged below the level of the solution therein for thereby forming a succession of small bubbles which rise into the space above the solution, adjacent said exit pipe, at second air inlet pipe in said reservoir, opening above the liquid level therein, and directed toward said exit pipe, for, supplying air for impelling said small bubbles formed by the first air inlet pipe into and through said exit pipe.

2. The combination as claimed in claim 1,

wherein the described structure is mounted in an air actuated horn, with the outer end of the bubble exit pipe being directed out of the mouth of the horn, with said air inlet pipes positioned to receive air from the mouthpiece end of the horn.

3. Apparatus for blowing bubbles, comprising a reservoir for a bubble forming solution, a bubble exit pipe carried by the reservoir, an air inlet pipe positioned in said reservoir, provided with two branches, one branch opening near the bottom of the reservoir and so normally immersed in the bubble forming solution, and operating to release air below the level of the solution to cause a succession of small bubbles to rise into the space adjacent said exit pipe, the other branch of the inlet pipe opening above the liquid level in the reservoir and being directed toward said exit pipe,

5 8 for supplying air for impelling said small bubbles into and through; said exit pipe. EFERENCES CITED ThB wmbination as claimed in 61111!!! 3, The following references are of record in the wherein the described structure is mounted in an fil of this patent; air actuated horn. with the outer end of the bubble exit pipe being directed out of the mouth UNITED STATES PATENTS of the horn, said air inlet pipe positioned to re- Number Name Date ceive air at the mouthpiece end of the horn. 616,239 King Dec. 20, 1898 1,389,098 Cohn Aug. 30, 1921 FRED A. QUINN, JR. 1 1,504,186 Evans et a] Aug. 5, 1924 MAX TRYON. 1.962.801 Bioxom June 12, 1934

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US616239 *Aug 29, 1896Dec 20, 1898 George ii
US1389098 *Jan 15, 1921Aug 30, 1921Exeloid CompanySoap-bubble pipe
US1504186 *May 30, 1923Aug 5, 1924H G StearnsWhistling bubble blower
US1962801 *Jun 13, 1932Jun 12, 1934Lynn Bloxom HarveyBubble blower
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2711612 *Jan 4, 1954Jun 28, 1955Wister Cynthia WDevice for blowing bubbles
US2828579 *May 27, 1957Apr 1, 1958Mann Jack EBubble gun
US2942375 *Jan 8, 1959Jun 28, 1960Bucic Jr GeorgeBubble producing devices
US3260462 *Apr 14, 1964Jul 12, 1966Leonhard SmacznyDrinking tube
US3473253 *Feb 28, 1967Oct 21, 1969Jakubowski Theodore PBubble blowing device
US3709433 *Mar 25, 1971Jan 9, 1973Handaille Ind IncMethod of and apparatus for generating mist
US3971157 *Nov 3, 1975Jul 27, 1976Gillis Robert EBubble machine with protective transparent dome
US4125959 *May 26, 1977Nov 21, 1978Yarik MarkiwSoap bubble blowers
US4276713 *Feb 4, 1980Jul 7, 1981Crosbie Scott CPercolating bubble generator
US5224892 *Oct 1, 1991Jul 6, 1993Messina Gene ABubble maker
US5334087 *Mar 8, 1993Aug 2, 1994Messina Gene ABubble maker
US6786251 *Jul 31, 2003Sep 7, 2004Craig P. NadelMethod and apparatus for generating bubbles
US7926791 *Jan 18, 2007Apr 19, 2011Bertoli Charles JOxygen supply humidification system
US8075363 *Nov 17, 2003Dec 13, 2011Igor Mikhailovich GomzarDevice and composition for blowing a soap bubble
US8177196 *Apr 18, 2011May 15, 2012Bertoli Charles JOxygen supply humidification system
US20040094228 *Jul 31, 2003May 20, 2004Nadel Craig P.Method and apparatus for generating bubbles
US20060154555 *Nov 17, 2003Jul 13, 2006Gomzar Igor MDevice and composition for blowing a soap bubble
US20080128427 *Nov 13, 2007Jun 5, 2008Friedman Mark NFluid drinking system
US20090056180 *Jun 13, 2008Mar 5, 2009Bouncing Brain Innovations Season Two Subsidiary 4 , LlcSoap bubble fountain
US20090061725 *Jun 13, 2008Mar 5, 2009Bouncing Brain Innovations Season Two Subsidiary 4, LlcSoap bubble fountain
US20090061726 *Jun 13, 2008Mar 5, 2009Bouncing Brain Innovations Season Two Subsidiary 4, LlcSoap bubble fountain
WO2004012831A2 *Jul 31, 2003Feb 12, 2004Nadel Craig PMethod and apparatus for generating bubbles
WO2004012831A3 *Jul 31, 2003Feb 24, 2005Hans R BronnerMethod and apparatus for generating bubbles
Classifications
U.S. Classification446/20, 261/121.1, 261/63
International ClassificationA63H33/28
Cooperative ClassificationA63H33/28
European ClassificationA63H33/28