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Publication numberUS2587972 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 4, 1952
Filing dateJan 30, 1946
Priority dateJan 30, 1946
Publication numberUS 2587972 A, US 2587972A, US-A-2587972, US2587972 A, US2587972A
InventorsCrise George W
Original AssigneeCrise George W
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Gem stone for articles of jewelry
US 2587972 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

March 4, 1952 w c s 2,587,972

GEM STONE FOR ARTICLES OF JEWELRY Filed Jan. 30, 1946 2 SHEETS-SHEET 1 F INVENTOR.

BY u- 6 Y'Z/S6 March 4, 1952 G. w. CRISE 2,587,972

GEM STONE FOR ARTICLES OF JEWELRY Filed Jan. 30, 1946 2 SHEETS-SHEET 2 INVENTOR.

BY 63902 96 W (rt/Se Patented Mar. 4, 1952 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE GEM STONE FOR ARTICLES OF JEWELRY George W. Crise, Columbus, Ohio Application January 30, 1946, Serial No. 644,371

3 Claims.

My invention relates to ornamental jewelry and, more specifically, to novelty jewelry comprising means for changing the coloration of the settings therein.

At present, it is necessary for a person desiring various colored articles of ornamentation to have a number of articles embodying each separate color.

It is, therefore, an object of my invention to provide a single article of ornamentation comprising a setting capable of transmitting various colors when viewed from various angles.

It is another object of my invention to provide a single article of ornamentation wherein the overall color of a setting may be changed by manually operable means.

It is still another object of my invention to provide an article of ornamentation comprising a multiplicity of settings whose colors may be ultimately changed by the wearer.

It is a further object of my invention to provide an article of ornamentation containing variegated settings which may be made from inexpensive clear molded glass having an index of refraction as low as 1.5.

V For a further understanding of my invention, reference is made to the following description and the accompanying drawings, wherein:

Fig. 1 is a plan view of an article of jewelry formed in accordance with the present invention;

Fig. 2 is a side elevational view thereof;

Fig. '3 is a top plan view disclosing the article in a mounted form;

Fig. 4 is a vertical transverse sectional View on the line 44-of Fig.3;

Fig. 5 is a horizontal sectional view on the line 5-5 of Fig. 4;

Fig. 6 is a pla nview of a modified form of my improved article of jewelry.

Referring to Figs. 1 and 2 of the drawings, it will be seen that my invention makes use of a flat top molded or out clear glass body I'O with an index of refraction in the neighborhood 'of 1.5 having upper and lower portions, each embodying six sides or facets. The planes of the upper side facets A, B, C, D, E and F having an angle of 35 degrees with the longitudinal axis X of the body, and the planes of the lower facets A, B, C, D, E and F have an angle of 30 degrees with the longitudinal axis X. The lower portion of the transparent body Ill is retained within a suitably shaped socket ll of a ring or brooch mounting l2. Any suitable coloring material is applied either directly to the outer surfaces of the lower facets of the transparent body 19 or to the corresponding walls of the socket II in direct intimate contact with the lower facets of the body. For ease of explanation, let us assume that facets A and D have the color red in registration with their surfaces, facets B and E have the color yellow, and facets C and F have the color blue.

Referring to Fig. 2 of the drawings, it will be seen that light or lines of vision directed perpendicularly to the plane of the facet A strike facet A and are deflected horizontally and downwardly striking the red colored facet D or the opposite facet .D from which they are in turn deflected down upon D. As the angle of vision is raised from the horizontal to within 35 degrees of the vertical, all lines of vision from the observer striking facet A and the fiat top surface of the body I!) will be ultimately focused to substantially a single point on the red colored facet D. From 35 degrees of the vertical to 15 degrees of the vertical, the opposite facet D will receive a small amount of the lines of vision which are deflected off of the body ID entirely. The .lines of vision striking the facets B and F will be focused together in converging horizontal beams and Will further converge upon downward travel so as to ultimately fall on the triangular facet D.

Thus it willbe seen that the lines of vision perpendicular to the plane of any one of the facets A, B, C, D, E or F will reflect the color of the opposite lower facet A, B, C, D, E and F, due to the short focus convergent optical qualities of the body 16. .Also, in viewing the body ID from any angle between 15 degrees of the vertical and vertical, the composite of all the colors of the lower facets will be reflected.

Figs. 3, 4 and 5 of the drawings disclose another form of .my invention wherein a transparent body 36 comprises a fiat top and an upper portion having six side-facets Whose planes form an angle of 35 degrees with the longitudinal axis X of the body 30, and a lower portion having a flat base and six 'side facets whose planes are parallel to the longitudinal axis X. A mounting 31 having an'open socket 32 providing mirroredo'r highly reflecting walls is adapted to receive and retain the transparent body 30. A slide element 33 is movably positioned within the mounting 3| below the fiat base of the transparent body 30, and has upon its upper surface, in registration with the base of the transparent body 30, a plurality of colored regions. Projecting studs 34 are rigidly attached to the mounting 3| and serve to retain the element within the mounting 3|, the slide element being movable so as to bring any desired color on the element in registration with the base surface of the body 30.

The slide element 33 may be constructed of any suitable material and is especially adapted to be constructed of a plastic for easeof coloration. The mounting 31 may take the form of any article of ornamentation such as a ring, brooch or pendant.

Fig. 6 of the drawings discloses still another form of my invention, wherein a cluster mounting 40 contains a series of spaced transparent bodies 4| identical to the transparent body used in the preceding modification. A rotary disk 42 is positioned within the mounting 40 and has alternate color regions arranged thereon in registration with the base surfaces of the transparent bodies 4 l. The rotary disk may be adjusted by loosening a screw 43 so as to vary the color of the transparent bodies 4|. This modification may also take the form of a ring but is more highly adaptable in the form of a brooch or some larger article of ornamentation.

In view of the foregoing disclosures, it will be seen that my invention provides an inexpensive novelty jewelry wherein the transparent bodies may be made from out or molded glass having an index of refraction as low as 1.5. It will also be manifest that my invention eliminates the necessity of having a number of different articles of ornamentation to provide a desired color scheme.

My invention is characterized by its simplicity of construction and cheapness of manufacture.

While I have described what I deem to be preferred forms of my invention, it will be understood that minor changes embodying the operating principles and utilizations of my improved transparent body may be made without departing from the spirit of the invention or the scope of the following claims.

I claim:

1. In an article of jewelry; a one-piece translucent jewel body of solid geometrical shape formed with a normally exposed viewing portion and a mounting portion normally concealed from the view of an observer, the viewing and mounting portions of said body being each symmetrical about the common longitudinal axis of said body and protruding longitudinally outwardly from the major transverse dimension of said body, the viewing portion of said body possessing short focus convergent optical qualities and being arranged to refract substantially all lines of sight of an observer looking upon the viewing portion of said body from one side thereof to substantially a single segment on the opposite side of the mounting portion of said body; and a plurality of differently colored coating films disposed in direct intimate contact with different segments of the mounting portion of said body, said films being disposed in different color sequence about the longitudinal axis of said body, whereby each of said films projects its color alone to an observer looking upon the viewing portion of said body from a side thereof opposite a given film, said body, when rotated axially and relative to the lines of sight of an observer, serving to impart to 4 the observer the illusion that the entire viewing portion of said body changes color.

2. In an article of jewelry; a one-piece translucent jewel body of solid geometrical shape formed with an upper viewing portion and a lower mounting portion normally concealed from the view of an observer, each of said upper and lower portions protruding longitudinally from the major transverse dimension of said body and being formed with a plurality of angularly related facets disposed in a symmetrical pattern about the longitudinal axis of said body, said body having short focus convergent optical qualities and being so formed'as to refract substantially all lines of sight of an observer viewing the upper portion of said body from one side thereof to substantially a single facet disposed on the opposite side of the lower portion of said body; and a plurality of differently colored coating films disposed in direct intimate contact with different facets of the lower mounting portion of said body and in different color sequence about the longitudinal axis of said body for transmitting separate and different colors to the upper viewing portion of said body when the latter is viewed from different sides thereof.

3. In an article of jewelry; a single piece translucent body of solid geometrical shape formed with an upper viewing portion and a lower mounting portion normally concealed from the view of an observer, each of the upper and lower portions of saidbody being formed. with a multiplicity of angularly related facets disposed in a ymmetrical pattern about the longitudinal axis of said body and each of the upper and lower portions of said body protruding longitudinally beyond the major transverse dimension of said body, the upper and lower portions of said body defining a gemshaped article having short focus convergent qualities and being arranged to refract substantially all lines of sight of an observer striking one side of the upper viewing portion of said body to a single facet on the opposite side of the lower mounting portion of said body; and a plurality of differently colored coating films disposed in direct contact with different facets of the lower mounting portion of said body, whereby each of said film projects its color alone to an observer viewing the upper portion of said body from a side thereof opposite a given film, said body, when rotated axially and relative to the lines of sight of an observer, servin to impart to the observer the illusion that the entire upper portion of said body changes color.

GEORGE W. CRISE.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS

Patent Citations
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US540768 *Apr 19, 1895Jun 11, 1895 Richard walsingham western
US1377130 *Aug 19, 1920May 3, 1921Shozaburo HashimotoImitation stone and process for manufacturing
US2348636 *Mar 7, 1941May 9, 1944Colt S Mfg CoGem
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2881654 *Oct 24, 1955Apr 14, 1959Toffolo Dominic SBiconical refractor
US5454235 *Apr 2, 1993Oct 3, 1995Freiesleben; UlrichCut diamond
US5657647 *Jul 26, 1995Aug 19, 1997Freiesleben; UlrichCut diamond
US6000240 *Aug 27, 1998Dec 14, 1999Noda; SatoshiJewels for live or artificial tooth or teeth
US6553786Oct 18, 1999Apr 29, 2003Kiwiat, Inc.Jewelry design employing fluorescent diamonds to create a hidden message
US7137275Nov 16, 2005Nov 21, 2006Azotic Coating Technology, Inc.Coatings for gemstones and other decorative objects
US7526928Dec 17, 2005May 5, 2009Azotic Coating Technology, Inc.Multi-color gemstones and gemstone coating deposition technology
US7596967 *Oct 25, 2006Oct 6, 2009Camellia Diamonds LtdEncrusted diamond
US20140075991 *Sep 19, 2012Mar 20, 2014Xinxin HeMulti-color gemstone coating technology
Classifications
U.S. Classification63/32, 359/615
International ClassificationA44C17/00
Cooperative ClassificationA44C17/008
European ClassificationA44C17/00G2