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Publication numberUS2590377 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 25, 1952
Filing dateJun 11, 1946
Priority dateJun 11, 1946
Publication numberUS 2590377 A, US 2590377A, US-A-2590377, US2590377 A, US2590377A
InventorsCater Joseph H
Original AssigneeCater Joseph H
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Carburetor
US 2590377 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

J.H.CATER March 25, 1952 CARBURETOR 2 SHEETSSHEET 1 Filed June 11, 1946 INVENTOR. Jose/ H5: C2752,

ATTORNEY.

March 25, 1952 J CATER 2,590,377

CARBURETOR Filed June 11, 1946 2 SHEETS-SHEET 2 IN V EN TOR.

Ar TOE/V5 y.

Patented Mar. 25, 1952 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE 171Claims. (Cl. 261-) This invention has to do with a carburetor or a generator for creating a combustible charge for the usual type of internal combustion engine, using gasoline or the like as a fuel, and it is a general object of the invention to provide a simple, practical, highly efficient device of the character mentioned which is free of the usual jets, floats, and delicate valves and the like that characterize carburetors as now ordinarily used.

'It is a generalobject of the present invention to provide a carburetor or charge generator which handles air and liquid fuel such as gasoline to vaporize the gasoline'and establish or deliver a combustible mixture of air and such'vaporized gasoline in which the fuel and air are proportioned-in a most advantageous manner.

Another object of the invention is to provide a device of the general character referred to wherein liquid fuel is picked up and vaporized through wick action or through the action of capillary attraction, and not by solid fuel being sprayed or injected into a stream of air, as is the case in the usual carburetor.

Another object of the present invention is to provide a carburetor of the general character referred to having drain means that serves to effectively relieve the device of excess liquid fuel that might otherwise cause flooding or undesirable choking of the device.

Another object of the'present invention is to provide a carburetor of the general character referred to involving'a plurality of saucer-shaped evaporator pans to handle the liquid fuel, which pans are such as to act eificientlythroughout various angles and are characterizedby a structural formation by which they hold a substantial quantity of liquid so that it does not immediately drain out before having an opportunity to vaporize.

It'is another object of the present invention to provide an improved simplified construction whereby evaporator pans such as have been referred to are heated in-a manner to efiectively expedite the evaporative action that takes place in the apparatus.

Itis another object of the present invention toprovide apparatus of the character referred to in which the air which circulatesthrough the apparatus and which picks up the vaporizedliquid fuel moves through the apparatus at a low velocity so that only properly vaporized fuel is carried out of the apparatus. By the construction that I have provided, the flow of air over the means provided for-vaporizing the wells at a low velocity and as a result no large bodiesor particles of liquid fuel are picked up and carried out of the apparatus, as is often the case with the ordinary companying drawings, in which:

Fig. 1 is a longitudinal vertical sectional view of the carburetor of the present invention showing it. applied to the intake manifold which may be the manifold of an ordinary combustion engine. Fig. 2 is a plan view of the parts shown in Fig. 1, being a view taken-substantially as indicated by line 2-2 on Fig. 1, and showing certain parts broken away to appear in section. Fig. 3 is a transverse sectional view of the structure, being a view taken as indicated by line 3--3 on Fig. 1. Fig. 4 is an enlarged detailed sectional View taken substantially as indicated by line 44 on Fig. 1. Fig. 5 is a sectional view taken as indicated by line 5-5 on Fig. 4. Fig. 6 is an enlarged detailed sectional view taken through the fuel nozzles showing in detail the manner in which the fuel is introduced to the evaporator pans, and Fig. 7 is an enlarged view of a part of the construction shown in Fig. 1, illustrating the manner in which the evaporator pans are connectedwith the headers through which the heating medium is supplied to the heating manifolds that are attached to the pans.

The carburetor of the present invention can be used, generally, where it is desired to mix air and liquid fuel such as gasoline to form a combustible mixture. For example, it can be to advantage in connection with an ordinary internal combustion engine of the gasoline type. In carrying out my invention I connect the carburetor to the manifold M of an engine and I drive a working element of the carburetor from the engine, but I have for purpose of simplicity eliminated any disclosure of the engine itself since my invention is in no way concerned with such details and since internal combustion engines of the gasoline type are well understood.

The carburetor that I have provided involves, generally, a main part or body A which acts primarily as a carrier for certain. other parts" and which forms a mixing chamber, a plurality of vertically. spaced cupped or saucer-like trays B in the body, means 0 for heating the trays, evaporator pads D located on or over the trays; spacers E arranged to establish the trays and pads in the desired relationship in the body A, fuel distributing means F supplying liquid fuel to the pads and trays, fuel supply means G receiving fuel from a suitable source and intermittently admitting it to the means F, a main shutoff H, control means J, and overflow means K in connection with the trays acting to drain 01f surplus liquid fuel.

The body A may, in pratcice, vary widely in size and shape. However, in practice I prefer that it be a box-like structure or chest elongate in plan configuration and substantially rectangular in cross-sectional configuration. The particular body shown in the drawings involves a bottom l0, side walls ll, ends I2 and a top H. I have shown the top removable from the other parts to provide access to the inside of the body and I have shown the end l2 at the inlet end of the structure tapered or somewhat funnel-shaped or flared to facilitate the distribution of air into the body, and I have shown the end l2 at the other end of the body correspondingly shaped to facilitate directing combustible mixture from the body to the means J. At the inlet end of the body A I provide a partition l2 supporting a plurality of distributing tubes 12 In the preferred form of my invention I provide one or more tubes for each of the trays B which tubesdirect the inlet air to the trays. The tubes 12* may be of substantial cross sectional area so that the air is distributed evenly across each tray to flow toward the outlet end of the body.

The trays or pans B that I provide in the body A are what I will term evaporator pans or trays and, in accordance with my invention, they are arranged in spaced relation one above the other in the body A and each tray is cupped or saucerlike, as will be seen from the drawings. The trays are preferably made to correspond, generally, to the plan configuration of the body A, and in practice I preferably form the "trays of sheet metal so that they are easily formed and are as light and thin as is consistent with strength and rigidity. In accordance with my invention the surface of each tray is provided, preferably completely occupied, with a plurality of small indentations or depressions M which act, as shown in Fig. 6, to normally catch and hold small quantities, or bodies [5 of liquid fuel. The indentations l4 serve to effectively check rapid drainage of the fuel from the trays and by forming the trays so that they are cupped or saucer-like, as shown throughout the drawings, and by providing flanges or baffies I l which project upwardly from the ends of the trays, the device is effective in various angular positions so that the action is not materially disturbed when it is tilted, as for example, when it is used on an automobile and tilts to various angles in the course of normal operation of the automobile.

In practice I preferably space the trays B a substantial distance apart in the body A and the desired spacing may be established or maintained in any desired manner. In the particular case illustrated I show each tray formed at its periphery or margin with a depending flange IS. The flange of the lowermost tray rests on the bottom ID of the body while the flange of each of the other trays rests on the tray beneath it and the top l3 of the body A has a depending flange [1 similar to the flanges [6 which, when the top is secured to the body, acts to hold or clamp the trays B in position within the body A. It will be apparent that by suitably pro- 4 portioning or extending the flanges I6 and I1 I may gain the desired spacing of the trays.

The means C provided for heating the trays B preferably involves, generally, a jacket 20 spaced below each tray forming a chamber 2| under each tray to carry a heating medium. Headers 22 are provided at each end of the body forming vertical ducts to carry the heating medium and the jackets 26 have end extensions 2| which join and are in connection with the headers. In the particular case illustrated each header is formed of a plurality of separable tubular sections which sections are arranged end to end or one above the other, there being a header section joined to each jacket extension. A tie member 23 is provided at each header to tie the several sections together. Each header has an extension 25 extending to the exterior of the body A and a supply duct 26 connects to one extension 25 while an exhaust duct 21 connects with the other extension 25. In practice any suitable heating medium may be employed, for instance, I may pass exhaust gases from the engine through the structure that I have described by introducing it through the duct 26 so that it passes through the chambers 2| established under each evaporator tray to finally exhaust out through the exhaust connection 21.

The evaporator pads D serve primarily to receive liquid fuel from the trays B and to handle such fuel so that it readily evaporates or vaporizes to be mixed with the air passing through the device. In the preferred construction each pad D corresponds, generally, in plan configuration with the tray B over which it is arranged and it is essentially a pad or body of finely divided or shredded non-corrosive, noncombustible material such as glass or metal wool, presenting a body having wick action or in which capillary attraction serves to elevate the liquid fuel from the trays and distribute it for evaporation or vaporization. In carrying out my invention I preferably provide a body 30 of metal wool such as brass or bronze wool of suitable texture and packed to have a density which causes the mass to have the desired capillary action. Where a pad or mat 30 of such material is used I preferably employ a carrier or confining envelope 3| of wire screening or the like in order to hold the material or pad 30 in.

the desired form, the envelopes or material 30 forming units that can, from time to time, be removed for cleaning or be replaced as circumstances may require.

The spacers E that I provide are arranged between adjacent assemblies each of which involves a tray and a pad D and they may be in the form of vertical ribs or fins 33 disposed throughout the structure at suitable points, as indicated in the drawings. These spacers serve to keep the parts of the assembly rigidly aligned and they are effective in maintaining spaces or passageways 35 between the tops of the pads D and the bottoms of the jackets 20, which passageways 35 form ducts through which air is passed through the device. The passageways that I have thus provided occur immediately above or over the exposed pads D so that vapors given off by the pads are immediately and readily picked up by the air, resulting in highly efficient operation of the device.

The fuel distributing means F preferably involves one or more nozzles 40 in connection with each tray and its pad D and a feed system or duct supplying liquid'fuel to the nozzles. In the preferred arrangement I provide several nozzl'es at suitable intervals along the side edges of. each tray-pad unit andI mountthe nozzles sothat they arecarried by the side walls H of thebody A, as shown inFig. 6 of the drawings. The. flanges I5. and I1 that depend: from the trays and top l3 are. provided'w-ithnotches or openings 4| to allow the nozzles to discharge inwardly to deliver liquid to the trays and pads. In forming the openings 4| suitable cuts are made in the flanges l6. and I1, and tabs 42 are bent up which form baffies for the fueldelivered by the nozzles 40. In the preferredconstruction the edge portionof each tray at anozzle: 49. is I lifted or bulged up somewhat,.as shown in Fig. 6, to rest on the baflle 42 so that there'is at this point a space 45 established between. the bottom of the pad and the top of the tray by which fuel from the nozzle is effectively distributed to the pad and tray. In the preferred arrangement the ducts 4.0 which connect to and supply the nozzles 40 may be. suitably arranged and connected together to be supplied with liquid fuel from the means G.

The fuel supply means G is'preferably supplied with liquid fuel such as gasoline under a suitable head or pressure by means of a supply pipe 59, andit serves to intermittently admit. fuel under pressure to the duct or ducts 49 for delivery to g the nozzles 49. The means G may, in practice, vary widely in form or construction. In the'case illustrated I show a means G driven or powered from the engine which is being supplied by the device and themeansG is in the nature of a mechanically operated valve mechanism. The mechanism as shown in Figs. 4 and 50f the drawings may involve a body in the form of a' casting orthe like having an inlet port 56' connected with the supply pipe 50 and an outlet port 5'! connected with the duct 49 A bore 53 is provided in the body 55 to intersect the ports 56 and 51' and a plunger type valve member 59 operates in the bore. The valve member has'a channel 69 formed in it which can bemoved'into position to register with the ports 56 and 51 so that fluid is passed through or by the valve. Suitable sealing rings 6| are provided aboveuand below the ports to prevent leakage and. a spring 62 is provided to normally yieldingly hold the valve 59 down so that the channel is out of register with the ports. The means for opening the valve 59 may involve a cam 19 carried on a cam shaft 1| so that each time the shaftisrotated-the valve is lifted to momentarily register the channel 68 with the ports 53 and 51. The drive that I have shown for the cam shaft 1! involves a flexible drive shaft 80 from the engine and a worm member 8| driven by the shaft 80; A worm gear'az fixed on the cam shaft 7| meshes with and isdriven by the worm 8|. In practice the flexible shaft 80 is connected to a moving part of the engine so that it is driven at a suitable speed and the gearing above described and the valve action that I have provided are related and proportioned so that an appropriate amount of liquid fuel is delivered to the tray pad units as the engine operates.

In practice I may supply slightly more fuel than is actually necessary so that there is ample evaporation. The means K which is an overflow means serves to drain any excess fuel from the trays. The drain means that I'have shown preferably involves a drain line 85 extending. from the device and a drain connection 86 from the trays is drained out of the structure without being deposited on the other trays or the pads of the other trays. In practiceI may provide asingle drain means K at thecenterof thestructureor I may provide a multiplicity of such drain means at different points in the construction as shown in Fig. 2 of the drawings, and the drain nozzles 81 at the center of the structure may extend slightly above the trap B to form an additional reservoir. A suitable pump 85 may be provided; such as an ordinary automotive fuelpump, to draw the excess fuel from the line 85 and. return it into the fuel system.

An air duct 88 is connected to the end |Z of the body A throughwhich air is admitted to the structure and a main shut-off means H is carried by or connected with the duct 88. As shown in the drawings the means H may involve a suitable valve 89 under control of a suitable operating device 90.

The control means J is arranged between the structure hereinabove described or, in other words, between the body A and the manifold M of the engine. In the preferred form of the inventionthe control means involves a delivery duct 9| in the form of an elongate tubehaving one end connected to the manifold and the other end open to receive air. The duct 9| has a side or lateral connection 9 i to which the outlet end- I2 of the body A is connected. The duct 9| is preferably restricted where the lateral connection 9W to which the outlet end l2, of the body A is connected. The duct 9| is preferably restricted where the lateral connection occurs so thata Venturi action is obtained. A throttle valve 92 is connected in the duct 9| immediately adjacent the point of connection with the manifold M- and a choke valve 93 is provided in the outer end portion of the duct or beyond the lateral connection 9| A suitable check valve or fire trap 94 is provided at the lateral connection 9| or in the structure where the outlet end of the body connects with the duct 9i). The trap 94 is normally open. However, it is designed so that should a backfire occur it automatically closes and thus prevents ignition of gases within the body A. In addition to or in place of the trap 94 I may provide a. suitable fire screen 95 to prevent flames from entering the body A. From the foregoing description it is believed that the operation of the device will be fully understood. The main control valve H is opened whenever the device is in use. This admits. air to the body A which air passes through the tubes I2 to be directed over the pads D of the trays B. The throttle valve 92 is set or positioned to govern the amount of combustible mixture to be deliv-. ered to the engine, thus governing the speed: of the engine. As the engine operates the shaft 80 is operated and consequently the means G ope erates so that liquid fuel or gasoline is intermittently delivered to the nozzles 40. The fuel de livered to the nozzles 40 is distributed over the trays B, its flow over the trays being retarded by the cup-like depressions of the trays, and a substantial amount, if not all, of the liquid thus, delivered to the trays is picked up by the pads D by capillary attraction, and consequently vaporizes or evaporates to be mixed with the air passing through the passages 35 which occur immediately above the pads. The mixture of air and vapors is delivered to the ductfll of the means J and the choke means 93 is operated to admit auxiliary air at this point, as circumstances require. It is to be understood that a suitable amount of heat is applied to the trays to facilitate or to expedite the action above described, and that as the device operates it can be varied as to angle in much the same manner that the carburetor of an automobile varies in angle as it operates on the ordinary automobile.

Having described only a typical preferred form and application of my invention, I do not wish to be limited or restricted to the specific details herein set forth, but wish to reserve to myself any variations or modifications that may appear to those skilled in the art and fall within the scope of the following claims.

Having described my invention, I claim:

1. A carburetor includin a body having an air inlet and a delivery opening, a plurality of vertically spaced cupped trays in the body, an evaporator pad corresponding in plan configuration with each tray and carried on and in contact with the top surface of each tray, there being a space above each pad, fuel distributing means supplying liquid fuel to the pads and trays, fuel supply means admitting fuel to the distributing means, a main shut off for the air inlet, means controlling the delivery opening, and overflow means draining surplus liquid from the trays the spaces above the pads being in communication with the air inlet and delivery openings and conducting air between said openings.

2. A carburetor including, a body having an air inlet and a delivery opening, a plurality of vertically spaced cupped trays in the body, an evaporator pad corresponding in plan configuration with each tray and carried on and in contact with the top surface of each tray, spacers establishing a space above the pad on each tray,

fuel distributing means supplying liquid fuel to the pads and trays, fuel supply means admitting fuel to the distributing means, a main shut off for the air inlet, means controlling the delivery opening, an overflow means draining surplus liquid from the trays the spaces above the pads being in communication with the air inlet and delivery openings and conducting air between said openings.

3. A carburetor including, a chest shaped body having a flared air inlet and a delivery opening, a plurality of vertically spaced cupped trays in the body, means for heating the trays including jackets beneath and substantially coextensive with the trays, an evaporator pad corresponding in plan configuration with each tray and carried on and in contact with the top surface of each tray, there being a space above each pad, fuel distributing means supplying liquid fuel to the pads and trays, fuel supply means intermittently admitting fuel to the distributing means, a main shut off for the air inlet, means controlling the delivery opening, and overflow means draining surplus liquid from the trays the spaces above the pads being in communication with the air inlet and delivery openings and conducting air between said openings.

4. A carburetor including, a. body having an air inlet and a deliver opening, a plurality of vertically spaced cupped trays in the body, an evaporator pad corresponding in plan configuration with each tray and carried on and in contact with the top surface of each tray, there being a space above each pad, fuel distributing means supplying liquid fuel to the pads and trays, fuel supply means admitting fuel to the distributing means, a main shut off for the air inlet, means controlling the delivery opening, and overflow means draining surplus liquid from the trays, the upper surface of each tray having a plurality of small individual depressions acting to catch and hold small bodies of liquid the spaces above the pads being in communication with the air inlet and delivery openings and conducting air between said openings.

5. A carburetor including, a body having an air inlet and a delivery opening, a plurality of vertically spaced cupped trays in the body, an evaporator pad corresponding in plan configuration with each tray and carried on and in contact with the top surface of each tray, flanges at the margins of the trays establishing a space above the pad on each tray, fuel distributing means supplying liquid fuel to the pads and trays, fuel supply means admitting fuel to the distributing means, a main shut off for the air inlet, means controlling the delivery opening, and overflow means draining surplus liquid from the trays the spaces above the pads being in communication with the air inlet and delivery openings and conducting air between said openings.

6. A carburetor including, a body having an air inlet and a delivery opening, a plurality of individual vertically spaced cupped trays in the body, means for heating the trays including spaced headers in the body one adapted to be supplied with a heating medium and the other having an exhaust opening, and individual jackets extending between the headers and beneath each individual tray, an evaporator pad corresponding in plan configuration with each tray and carried on and in contact with the top surface of each tray, there being a space above each pad, fuel distributing means supplying liquid fuel to the pads and trays, fuel supply means admitting fuel to the distributing means, a main shut off for the air inlet, means controlling the delivery opening, and overflow means draining surplus liquid from the trays the spaces above the pads being in communication with the air inlet and delivery openings and conducting air between said openings.

'7. A carburetor including, a body having an air inlet and a delivery opening, a plurality of individual vertically spaced cupped trays in the body, means for heating the trays including spaced headers in the body one adapted to be supplied with a heating medium and the other having an exhaust opening, and individual jackets extending between the headers and beneath each individual tray, an evaporator pad corresponding in plan configuration with each tray and carried on and in contact with the top surface of each tray, there being a space above each pad, fuel distributing means supplying liquid fuel to the pads and trays, fuel supply means admitting fuel to the distributing means, a main shut off for the air inlet, means controlling the delivery opening, and overflow means draining surplus liquid from the trays, each header including a plurality of separable tubular sections arranged end to end, each section being joined with a jacket the spaces above the pads being in communication with the air inlet and delivery openings and conducting air between said openings.

8. A carburetor including, a body having an air inlet and a delivery opening, a plurality of vertically spaced cupped trays in the body, an evaporator pad corresponding in plan configuration with each tray and carried on and in contact with the top surface of each tray, there being a individual vertically spaced cupped trays in the body, means for heating the trays, an evaporator ,15

pad carried on each tray, there being a space above each pad, fuel distributing means supplying liquid fuel to the pads and trays including a pluralityqof nozzles at the sides of the body spraying the fuel inwardly to the trays andpads, fuel supply means admitting fuel to the distributing means, a main shut off for the air inlet, means controlling the delivery opening, and overflow means draining surplus liquid from the trays, the

upper surface of each tray having a plurality of small individual depressions acting to catch and hold small bodies of liquid, the spaces above the pads being in communication with the air inlet and delivery openings and conducting air between said openings.

10. A carburetor including, a body having an air inlet and a delivery opening, a plurality of vertically spaced cupped trays in the body, means for heating the trays, an evaporator pad carried on each tray, there being a space above each pad, fuel distributing means supplying liquid fuel to the pads and trays including nozzles at the sides of the body spraying the fuel inwardly to the trays and pads, fuel supply means admitting fuel to the distributing means, a main shut off for the air inlet, means controlling the delivery opening, overflow means draining surplus liquid from the trays, and baiiles at the nozzles supporting the edge portions of the pads at the nozzles, the upper surface of each tray having a plurality of small individual depressions acting to catch and hold small bodies of liquid, the spaces above the pads being in communication with the air inlet and delivery openings and conducting air between said openings.

11. A carburetor including, a body having an air inlet and a delivery opening, a plurality of vertically spaced cupped trays in the body, means for heating the trays, an evaporator pad corresponding in plan configuration with each tray and carried on and in contact with the top surface of each tray, there being a space above each pad, fuel distributing means supplying liquid fuel to the pads and trays, fuel supply means admitting fuel to the distributing means including a plunger valve and operating means for the valve intermittently opening it, a main shut off for the air inlet, means controlling the delivery opening,

and overflow means draining surplus liquid from the trays the spaces above the pads being in communication with the air inlet and delivery openings and conducting air between said openings.

12. A carburetor including, a bod having an air inlet and a delivery opening. a plurality of vertically spaced cupped trays in the body, means for heating the trays, an evaporator pad corresponding in plan configuration with each tray and carried on and in contact with the top surface of each tray, there being a space above each pad, fuel distributing means supplying liquid fuel to the pads and trays,.fuel supply meansadmitting fuel to the distributing means, a main shut off for the air inlet, means controlling :the'delivery opening, and overflow meansdraining-surplus liquid from the trays including drain nozzles in the trays and discharging one directly into another to conduct fluid away from the trays'to a drain pipe the spaces above the pads being in communication with the air inlet and delivery openings and conducting air between saidopenings.

13. A carburetor including, a body-having an air inlet and a deliver opening, a plurality of vertically spaced cupped trays in thebody;means for heating the trays, an evaporator pad corresponding in plan configuration with each'tray and carried on and in contact with the tong-surface of each tray, there being a space above each pad, fuel distributing meanssupplying'liquidgfuel to the pads and trays, fuel supply-means admitting fuel to the distributing means, a main shut off for the air inlet, means controlling the delivery opening, and overflow means drainingsurplus liquid from the trays including drain nozzles in the centers of the trays and discharging ;one directly into another to conduct fluid away from the trays to a drain pipe the spaces above the pads being in communication with the air'inlet and delivery openings and conducting air between said openings.

14. A carburetor including, a body having an air inlet and a delivery opening, a plurality of vertically spaced cupped trays in the body, means for heating the trays, an evaporator pad corresponding in plan configuration with each tray and carried on and in contact with the top surface of each tray, there being a space above each pad, fuel distributing means supplying liquid fuel to the pads and trays, fuel supply means admitting fuel to the distributing means, a main shut off for the air inlet, means controlling the delivery opening including a delivery duct having an air opening and in communication with the body, and overflow means draining surplus liquid from the trays the spaces above the pads being in communication with the air inlet and delivery openings and conducting air between said openings.

15. A carburetor including, a body having an air inlet and a delivery opening, a plurality of vertically spaced cupped trays in the body, means for heating the trays, an evaporator pad corresponding in plan configuration with each tray and carried on and in contact with the top surface of each tray, there being a space above each pad, fuel distributing means supplying liquid fuel to the pads and trays, fuel supply means admitting fuel to the distributing means, a main shut off for the air inlet, means controlling the delivery opening including a delivery duct having an air inlet opening and having communication with the body and a check valve checking flow from the duct into the body, and overflow means draining surplus liquid from the trays the spaces 5 above the pads being in communication with the air inlet and delivery openings and conducting air between said openings.

16. A carburetor including, a body having an air inlet and a delivery opening, a plurality of vertically spaced cupped trays in the body, air distributing means receiving air from the inlet opening and distributing it over the trays, means for heating the trays including an individual cupped jacket beneath each individual tray, an evaporator pad corresponding in plan configuration with each tray and carried on and in contact with the top surface of each tray, there being a space above each pad, fuel distributing means supplying liquid fuel to the pads and trays, fuel supply means admitting fuel to the distributing means, a main shut off for the air inlet, means controlling the delivery opening, and overflow means draining surplus liquid from the trays the spaces above the pads being in communication with the air inlet and delivery openings and conducting air between said openings.

17. A carburetor including, a body having an air inlet and a delivery opening, a plurality of vertically spaced cupped trays in the body, means for heating the trays, an evaporator pad corresponding in plan configuration with each tray and carried on and in contact with the top surface of each tray, there being a space above each pad, fuel distributing means supplying liquid fuel to the pad and trays, fuel supply means admitting fuel to the distributing means, a main shut off for the air inlet, means controlling the delivery opening, and overflow means draining surplus liquid from the trays including drain nozzles in each tray,the nozzle in one tray being above and in alignment with the nozzle in the next lower tray and discharging one into another to conduct fluid away from the trays to a drain pipe the spaces above the pads being in communication with the air inlet and delivery openings and conducting air between said openings.

JOSEPH H. CATER.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 231,635 West Aug. 24, 1880 312,186 Butler Feb. 10, 1885 420,591 Dawson Feb. 4, 1890 730,938 Luedke June 16, 1903 794,938 Houlon July 18, 1905 906,940 Schmitt et al. Dec. 15, 1908 1,082,865 Goodyear Dec. 30, 1913 1,089,501 Ruthven Nov. 10, 1914 1,264,464 Wold Apr. 30, 1918 1,634,022 Dalton June 28, 1927 1,747,066 Gaston Feb. 11, 1930 1,954,177 Jones et al. Apr. 10, 1934 1,985,689 Persons Dec. 25, 1934 FOREIGN PATENTS Number Country Date 84,062 Switzerland Feb. 16, 1920

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3053242 *Sep 3, 1959Sep 11, 1962Michael A ArpaiaCarbureting system
US3136829 *Nov 9, 1959Jun 9, 1964Roy P SkerrittHorizontal-air-flow humidifier
US4715346 *Apr 14, 1986Dec 29, 1987Dempsey Beth RCarburetor for internal combustion engine
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Classifications
U.S. Classification261/146, 261/98, 261/95, 261/36.2, 261/154
International ClassificationF02M17/28, F02M17/00
Cooperative ClassificationF02M17/28
European ClassificationF02M17/28