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Publication numberUS2590754 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 25, 1952
Filing dateOct 26, 1945
Priority dateAug 30, 1943
Publication numberUS 2590754 A, US 2590754A, US-A-2590754, US2590754 A, US2590754A
InventorsCline Edwin L
Original AssigneeClayton Manufacturing Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Deaerating apparatus
US 2590754 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

March 25, 1952 E. CLINE 2,590,754

DEAERATING APPARATUS Original Filed Aug. so, 1945 2 SHEETS-SHEET 1 ZJ W Z. 6 1' e 1/ III! 1111/1/14 win- March 25, 1952 E. CLINE DEAERATING APPARATUS Original Filed Aug. 50, 1943 2 SHEETS-SHEET 2 s/alygi'; 9 3/4 I 514 Qwuwwbom [tia'zaz'n Z (Zine Patented Mar. 25, 1952 DEAERATING APPARATUS Edwin L. Cline, Pasadena, Calif., assignor to Clayton Manufacturing Company, Alhambra, Calii., a corporation of California Original application August 30, 1943, Serial No. 500,591. Divided and this application October 26, 1945, Serial No. 624,892

10 Claims.

. The present invention relates to liquid and gas separation apparatus and more particularly to deaerating apparatus for use in separating the air from the liquid of a hydraulic dynamometer apparatus, as set forth in my copending application Serial No. 500,591, filed August 30, 1943, entitled Hydraulic Dynamometer, and of which the instant application is a true division.

The principal object of the invention is to provide means for effectively separating air from a liquid. I Another object of the invention is to provide a device for separating air and liquid by centrifugal force arranged in such fashion that the path of flow of the liquid is straightened out" before it leaves the device so that no air is entrained in the discharged liquid.

Another object of the invention is to provide liquid and gas separation apparatus including means for preventing the gas containing liquid from passing directly from the inlet to the outlet of said apparatus.

Still another object of the invention is to provide a centrifugal gas and liquid separator including means for controlling the depth of the vortex' of the rotating liquid.

Other objects and advantages of the invention will be apparent from the following description taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings, in which:

Fig. 1 is an elevational view of a liquid and gas separation device embodying the principles of the present invention;

Fig. 2 is a longitudinal sectional view through the device shown in Fig. 1;

Fig. 3 is a plan view of the device shown in Fig. 1;

" Fig. 4 is a. horizontal sectional view taken on the line 4-4 of Fig. 2 and particularly illustrating the shape of the inlet opening of the device;

Fig. 5 isa sectional view taken on the line 5-5 of Fig. 2 and illustrating the manner in which bafile means is employed to prevent the liquid irompassing directly toward the outlet of the device; and

i Fig. 6 is a sectional view taken onthe line 6-8 bf 2' particularly showing the arrangement of'the vanes-in the lower section of the device for converting the whirling movementof the liquid upper end of the upper section 300. The lower section 30l has an upwardly projecting flange 303 (Fig. 2) on the rim thereof which is received in a mating recess 304 in the lower end of the section 300, whereby the flange and reces's cooperate to maintain the sections 300 and 301 in vertical alignment.

The lower section 30! has a solid axial core 305 which is provided at its upper end with a threaded aperture 306. A plurality of radial vanes 30'! extend outwardly from the core 305 and merge with the inner periphery of the section 301. The vanes 307 terminate short of the bottom of the cup section 30| as indicated at 308. The vanes 301 also terminate short of the flange 303 and a circular baffle plate 309, slightly smaller in diameter than the internal diameter of the section 30!, rests flush upon the upper edges of said vanes. A wall portion 3l0 oi the section 301 is thickened to form a pad that extends radially inwardly a sufiicient distance to partially underlie the baille 309, as is best shown in Figure 5. The thickened wall portion 3"] is provided with an outlet opening 3 into which a pipe nipple 312 is threaded. A liquid discharge hose section 253 has one end thereof connected with the nipple 312 and, its opposite end is connected with any suitable apparatus such as a heat exchanger; etc. (not shown).

The deaerator sections 300 and 30| and the cap 302 are maintained in assembled relation by a rod 3 t5, the lower end of which extends through the bafiie 309 and is threaded into the recess 306 in the core 305,-as shown in Fig. 2. The upper end of the rod 3!?) extends through the cover 302 and a nut (H6 is threaded thereon and tightly clamps the parts together. A'gasket 3H under the nut 3H5 prevents leakage along the rod 315-.

The upper section 300 is provided with an in let duct 318 formed exteriorly thereof. .The inlet duct 318 has a threaded circular opening 3|9 into which a pipe nipple 320 is threaded. An inlet hose section IE5 is suitably connected with the nipple 320. Except for the circular opening 3), the inlet duct 3l8 is substantially rectangular in cross-section and progressively decreases in width through the hose 253.

3 in Fig. 4. Hence, the liquid which passes through the duct 3l8 is introduced into the section 300 with a rapid rotating or whirling motion. The effect of this is to cause the liquid to tend to move radially outwardly by centrifugal force, thereby effecting a separation bf the air from the liquid, in a manner readily understood. The rapid whirling motion imparted to the liquid produces a vortex, generally indicated by the dot-and-dash lines 32l (Fig. 2), and the separated air collects within this vortex. A washer or splash plate 322 is welded or otherwise secured to the rod'3 l adjacent the cover plate 302. The upper end of the rod 3l5 is provided with a longitudinal passageway 323. which communicates with .the interior, of

the section 30l through a plurality of ventopenings 324 disposed between the washer 322 and the inner face of the cover 302. The passageway 323 and the vent openings 324 provide a means of escape for the air separated from the liquid inthe deaerator. The washer or splash plate 322 prevents the liquid from being splashed up into the vent openings 324 so that the amount of liquid withdrawn fromthe deaerator with the air is maintained at a minimum.

A conventional coupling fitting 325 is'threaded into the upper end of the tube 3l5 providing the passageway 323 and an air discharge tube I5! is connected to saidfitting.

The periphery of the bafile plate 309 (see Fig.5)

isspaced from theinner wall of the section 30i to provide three arcuate passageways 314 which permit liquid to pass from the section 300 downwardly into the section 30! between the vanes 301. However, in view of the fact that the baiile 309 overlaps the wall portion 3I0, it is impossible for the liquid to pass from the section 30I directly downwardly and out through the opening 3| l. Instead. the liquid must pass downwardly through the recesses 3l4 and along the vanes 307, which have a straightening effect on the swirling liquid, and then pass beneath the loweredges 308 of said vanes and then into the spaceadjacent the thickened wall 310 communicating with the outlet .opening 3| 1.

The depth of the air vortex 32 I in the deaerator is controlled so that its apex does not-extend deeply enough to allow some of the air to pass out of said deaerator with the liquid discharging Thus, the depth of the air vortex .32] may be controlledby making the air tube I51 of a given predetermined internal diameter so that the air will be withdrawn at a desired rate. In other words, the internal diameter of the tube I51 may be made such as to constrict the rate of flow of air therethrough so that a sufilcient air pressure above atmosphericpressure is maintained within the upper housingsection 300 to assure the air vortex 32l of a desired depth. As an alternative means of controlling the depth of the air vortex 32 I, the vent openings or orifices 324 in the rod 3I5 may be made such that their combined cross-sectional areas will create the necessary restriction of the air discharging from the deaerator to such rate as to give the desired depth to the vortex. Unless this depth is controlled by proper air discharge restrictions, an excess of air in the deaerator will cause air topass into the outlet hose 253, or if the air pressure'is too low the upper housing section 300 will tend to fill up with liquid and too much'liquid will be withdrawn through the tube I51 with the discharged air.

The radial vanes 301iin the llowersection 30l of the deaerator, in cooperation with theba'file 300, also serve to prevent the air vortex 32! from being drawn downwardly by the velocity of the liquid to such extent as to permit air to pass to the outlet hose 253. Thus, it will be apparent that the baiiie 309 restricts and permits downflow only at the peripheral spaces 3M and the straightening action of the vanes 30'! compels the swirling liquid to move downwardly, instead of rotatively, and thereby assists in maintaining an air vortex of the desired depth by further retarding liquid flow.

It will-be understood that the liquid is introyduced-into the deaerator under substantial pressure and is whirled therein at a high velocity. This velocityissuflicient to cause the liquid and air to become separatedand the liquid in the lower sec- :tion 30 Lof the deaerator to be forced into the outlet hose section 253. The pressure of the air in the vortex 32l must,,of course, be sufliciently high to insure that the liquid will be forced into the outlet hose section 253, otherwise the deaerator could not perform its intended function of air and liquid separation. The separated air is, of course, removed from the deaerator through the air tube [51.

Itwill also be understood that various changes may be made in the arrangement and details of construction of the liquid and gas separation-device disclosed herein, without departing from the principles of the invention or the scope of the annexed claims.

It will be further understood'that the liquid and gasseparation device disclosed herein isof general utility'and is not limited to use with a hydraulic brake unit, although the same has been found to be highly satisfactory for such specific use.

I claim:

1. A deaerating devicecomprising'an upper cylindrical section; a lower cup-like section; a cap forming a closure for the upper end of said'cylindrical section, said upper cylindrical sectionhaving an'inlet duct discharging tangentially into the interior of said section, wherebyliquid introduced through said inlet duct has'a rapid whirling'motion imparted thereto to remove the air therefrom, said lower cup-like section having anaxial core and 'a'plurality of radial 'vanes extending outwardly from said core and merging with the inner surface of the side wallo'f said'lowercuplikesection, said radial vanes terminatingshort of the bottom of said lower cup -like section; .a circular bafiie plate resting uponsaidcore andthe upper edges of said radial vanes, said bafileplate being smaller in diameter than the internal ,diameter of said lower cup-like section, whereby .to provide .arcuate passageways .for liquid between said upper and lower sections; .a portion of the side wall of said lower cup-like section being thickened and projectinginwardly .to. a point underlying-said circular baflle plate; ,an outlet opening extending through .said thickened wall portion, whereby liquid ispreventedfrom passing di rectly from said upper cylindrical section to said outlet opening; a rod extending-through said .cap and having a reduced end extending through .said

circular baiile :plateand threadedinto said axial per and lower sections and said cap member together, a plurality of vent openingsin said rod communicating with the interior of said upper section at a point adjacent the inner surface of said cap; and a passageway in said rod extending upwardly from said vent openings.

2. A deaerating device comprising: an upper cylindrical section; a lower cup-like section, the lower end of said cylindrical section and the upper end of said cup-like section having mating flanges for maintaining said sections in registration; a cap forming a closure for the upper end of said cylindrical section, said upper cylindrical section having an inlet duct arranged exteriorly of said section and discharging tangentially into the interior of said section, whereby liquid introduced through said inlet duct has a rapid whirling motion impartedthereto to remove the airtherefrom, said inlet duct progressively decreasing in width and increasing in height in a circumferential direction from the entrance thereof to the point of discharge; said lower cup-dike section having an axial core and a plurality of radial vanes extending outwardly from said core and merging with the inner surface of the side wall of said lower cuplike section, said radial vanes terminating short of the bottom of said lower cup-like section; a circular baflle plate resting upon said core and the upper edges of said radial vanes, said baflle plate being smaller in diameter than the internal diameter of said lower cup-like section, whereby to provide arcuate passageways for liquid between said upper and lower sections; a portion of the-side wall of said lower cup-like section being thickened and projectin inwardly to a point underlying said circular baffle plate; an outlet opening extending through said thicl ened wall portion, whereby liquid is prevented from passing directly from said upper cylindrical section to said outlet opening; a rod extending through said cap and having a reduced end extending through said circular baflle plate and threaded into said axial core of said lower sec: tion, the upper end of said rod projecting through said cap member and being externally threaded; a nut threaded upon said projecting end of said rod and-clamping said upper and lower sections and said cap member together, a washer secured to said rod at a point spaced below said cap member; a plurality'of vent openings in said rod communicating with the interior of said upper section at a point between the inner surface of said cap and said washer, and a passageway in said rod extending from said vent openings to the upper end of said rod.

3. A deaerating device, comprising: a generally cylindrical housin including a side wall and top and bottom walls, said side wall having an inlet duct atits upper end arranged to discharge tangentially interiorly thereof, whereby liquid introduced through said inlet duct has a rapid whirling motion imparted thereto to remove the air therefrom; bafiie means in the lower portion of said housing including a series of vanes extending inwardly from the inner surface of said side well, said vanes terminating short of said bottom wall, a horizontal baiile supported by said vanes, and a pad on said side wall in one of the spaces between adjacent vanes extending from vane to vane and underlying said horizontal baffle. said horizontal baffle being spaced from the inner surface of said side wall to provide passagegated cylindrical housing having a side wall and;-

ing having alconstantly open outlet at the lower;

end thereof for deaerated liquid, said outlet constituting the sole means of egress for said deaerated liquid, said housing having a restricted air vent at the upper end thereof for restricting the discharge of air separated from said liquid to create a back pressure for aiding in producing an air vortex of a desired depth in said housing above said horizontal baflle means, said horizontal and vertical baflle means retarding liquid flow and cooperating with said restricted air vent to aid in maintaining said air vortex in said housing.

5. A deaerating device as defined in claim 4.

including a splash plate fixedly mounted adjacent the air vent for preventing liquid from splashing into said air vent.

6. A deaerating device, comprising: elongated- I cylindrical housing means having a side wall ways for liquid communicating with the remainand top and bottom walls, said housing having an inlet duct adjacent its upper end arranged to discharge liquid tangentially into the interior thereof, whereby liquid introduced through said inlet duct has a rapid whirling motion imparted thereto to centrifugally separate air therefrom, said housing having a plurality of radial vanes in the lower portion thereof extending inwardly from said side wall for interrupting whirling movement of said liquid and causing said liquid to, move vertically downward, said radial vanes hav-f ing lower ends terminating close to said bottom wall; a circular baflle plate resting horizontally,

upon the upper ends of said radial vanes, said baflle plate being slightly smaller in diameter than the internal diameter of said housing, whereby to provide arcuate passageways for restricting liquid flow past said balile plate to the spaces between the vanes therebelow, said housing having a constantly open outlet in said side wall for deaerated liquid disposed below said baffle plate but above the lower ends of said radial vanes, said outlet constituting the sole means of egress for deaerated liquid; and restricted air vent means at the top of said housing cooperable with said baf fie means for aiding in maintaining an air vortex of a desired depth in said housing above said baffle plate.

7. A deaerating device, comprising: an upper cylindrical section; a lower cup-like section sepa. rable from said upper cylindrical section and having a bottom wall and a cylindrical side wall axially aligned with said upper cylindrical sec-. tion; a cap formin a closure for the upper e d of said cylindrical section, said upper cylindrical section h ving an inl t u arr nged to dischar e liquid tangentially into the interior of said section, whereby liquid introduced through said in: let duct has a rapid whirling motion imparted thereto to centriiugally separate the air therefrom. said lower cup-like section having an axial core extending upwardly from said bottom wall and u a plurality of radial vanes extending outwardly from" said core andmerging with the inner surface of the side wall ofsaidlower.cup-likeis'ection, said radial vanes having thelower ends thereof spaced from said. bottom wall of said lower cuplike section; horizontal bafile means above said radial vanes arranged to provide passageways of limited area to restrict liquid flow between said upper and lower'sections; a constantly'open outlet-for deaerated liquid in said lower section and constituting the sole meansof egress for deaeratedliquid; means securing said cap and upper and lower sections in assembled relation; and restricted air vent means cooperable with said baffle means'and vanesfor aiding inmaintaining an air vortex'of a desireddepth insaid upper section above said horizontal baffle means.

8;A deaerating. device, comprising: an-upp'er cylindrical section;. alower cup-like section havingabottom wall and a side wall aligned with said upper cylindrical section; a cap forming. a closure for the upper end of said cylindrical section, said upper cylindrical section having an inlet ductfor discharging liquid tangentially into the' interior thereof, whereby liquid introduced through said inlet duct has a rapid whirling motion imparted thereto to remove theair therefrom, said lower cup-like section having anaxial core and a plurality of radial vanes extendingoutwardly'from said core and merging with the inner surface of the side wall of said lower'cup-like section, said radial vanes terminating short of the bottom of said lower cup-like section; a removable circular bafile plate resting horizontally uponsaid core'and the upper edges of saidradi'al.

vanes, said bafile platebeing slightly smaller. in diameter than the internal diameter of said lower cup-like section, whereby to provide arcuate passageways for restricting liquid flow between said upper and lower sections, said lower cup-like section having a constantly open outlet for liquid below said bafiie plate; a rod extending through said cap having its lower end threaded into said axial core of said lower cup-like section,.the upper end of said rod projecting through said cap member and being externally threaded; means on. said projecting end of said rod clamping said upper and lower sections and said cap member together; and restricted vent means for venting separated air from said upper section to theatmosphere.

9. A deaerating. device comprising an upper cylindrical section; a lower cup-like section having a bottom wall and a sidewall aligned with said upper cylindrical section; a cap forming a closure for the upper end of said cylindrical section, said upper cylindrical section having an inlet duct for discharging liquid tangentially into the interior thereof, whereby liquid introduced through said inlet duct has a rapid whirling motionimparted thereto to remove the air therefrom, said.

lower cup-like section having an axial core and a plurality of radial vanes extending outwardly from said core and merging with the inner surface of the side wall of said lower cup-like section,

said radial vanes terminating short of the-bottom of said lower cup-like section; a removable circular baffle plate resting upon said core and the upper edges of said radial vanes, said baliie plate being slightly smaller in diameter than the internal diameter of said lower cup-like section, whereby to provide arcuate passageways for restricting liquid flow between said upper and lower sections, said lowercup-like section having a constantly open outlet for liquid below said baiile plate; a

rod extending through said cap having. its

lower end threaded into said axial core of said lower section, the upper end of said rod projecting through said cap member and being externally threaded; and means on said projecting end of said rod clamping said upper and lower sections and said cap member together, said rod having a plurality of restricted vent openings communicating with the interior of said upper section at a point adjacent the inner surface of said cap and also having a passageway extending upwardly from said vent openings to the exterior of said cap member.

10. A deaerating device as defined in claim 9. wherein a splash plate is mounted upon the rod adjacent the cap but below the vent openings.

EDWIN L. CLINE.

REFERENCES CITED The. following references are of record inthefile of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 1,440,808 Wineman Jan. 2,1923 1,581,371 Weisgerber Apr. 20, 1926 1,661,685 Walker Mar. 6, 1928 2,010,435 Matheson Aug. 6, 1935 2,064,988 Risser Dec. 22, 1936 2,106,589 Bigger et al Jan. 25,.1938 2,188,801 Worth Jan. 30, 1940 2,214,658 Browning Sept. 10, 1940 2,295,101 Dunham Sept. 8, 1942 2,316,729 Tryon Apr. 13, 1943 FOREIGN PATENTS Number Country Date 482,594 Great Britain Apr. 1, 1938 440,015 Germany Jan'.26, 1927 465,486 Germany Sept. 19, 1928 118,330 Australia June 30, 1942

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2765867 *Jun 17, 1953Oct 9, 1956StamicarbonMethod of separating dispersed gas from a liquid
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US2846024 *May 21, 1956Aug 5, 1958Schweizerische LokomotivCyclone
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US7435290 *May 26, 2005Oct 14, 2008Rolls-Royce PlcCentrifugal gas/liquid separators
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Classifications
U.S. Classification96/212
International ClassificationG01F15/00, B01D19/00, G01L3/16, G01L3/20, G01F15/08
Cooperative ClassificationB01D19/0057, G01L3/20, G01F15/08
European ClassificationG01L3/20, B01D19/00P4B, G01F15/08