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Publication numberUS2593472 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 22, 1952
Filing dateApr 29, 1947
Priority dateApr 29, 1947
Publication numberUS 2593472 A, US 2593472A, US-A-2593472, US2593472 A, US2593472A
InventorsMcginn James B
Original AssigneeAmerican Viscose Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Steel shipping package for section beams
US 2593472 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

April 22, 1952 J. c m

STEEL SHIPPING PACKAGE FOR SECTION BEAMS Filed April 29, 1947 JNVEN TOR.

JAMES B. McGl/VN Patented Apr. 22, 1952 STEEL SHIPPING PACKAGE FOR SECTION BEAMS James B. McGinn, Philadelphia, Pa., assignor to American Viscose Corporation,

Wilmington,

Del., a corporation of Delaware Application April 2 9, 1947, Serial No. 744,592

6 Claims.

This invention relates to the loading and transportation of yarn beams and the like. More particularly,- this invention concerns an appar-atus for loading a large number of heavy spools or beams of yarn in a vehicle in such a way as to avoid shifting of the load in transit.

The problem which gave rise to the present invention was the transportation of large spools of rayon thread from themanufacturing plant to the looms or mills. The beams under consideration weigh up to approximately one thousand pounds each, and in loading and transporting the beams, considerable difficulty was experienced in arranging and supporting the beams in the truck or car body in a manner such as to avoid shifting and resultant damage during transportation. Obviously the question of space plays an important part in the problem, and it became practically essential to load the beams in rows and in superimposed relation. Despite extreme care and more or less complicated reinforcing and checking structures used in the loading, the losses resulting from shifting of the spools and crushing or bruising of a relatively large quantity of thread often were considerable since in the event the thread of a beam is bruised, the latter is returned for rewinding.

The primary object of the present invention therefore is to provide an apparatus for securing relatively large, heavy beams and similarly shaped objects in a manner such as to avoid shifting and resultant damage to the contents of the beams during transportation. More specifically, the invention is concerned with the loading and transportation of beams of thread, such as rayon thread, and threads which are susceptible to bruising and damage when the edge of one beam strikes and rides upon the body portion of another.

Another object is to provide means whereby a plurality of relatively large and heavy spool shaped objects may be loaded in superimposed relationship onto a truck orvfreight car body or other supporting structure expeditiously and with relative ease and transported any desired distance over rough roadways without danger of relative shifting and misalignment of the spools.

Other objects and advantages of the present invention will become apparent from a study of the drawings and description hereinafter.

In the drawings Figure 1 is a perspective view of a preferred embodiment of the present invention.

Figure 2 is an enlarged view of detail B in V Figure 1.

secured by a weld or the like.

As shown in Figure 1, reference character I indicates generally the framework for supporting the section beams 2 and 3. The framework comprises the vertical members 4, 5, 6 and I, longitudinally extending members 8, 9, II), II and I2 and the transverse members [3, l4, l5, I6 and I1. The structure is further reinforced by the diagonal members A, B, C and D. All of the aforementioned members are suitably Welded to the longitudinal members 8 and 9 are two transverse angle irons l8 and I9 which support the vertical component of force from the section beams 2 and 3. The transverse angle irons l8 and l9 are spaced at such a distance that the horizontal movement in the transverse direction by arcuate flange-clamping means 20, 2|, 22 and 23 fixedly secured to the underside of the hingedly mounted transverse skid racks 24 and 25. The skid racks are connected by a longitudinal member 26. The transverse skid racks 24 and 25 are hingedly mounted to the longitudinal member I2 by the pins 21. Supported in the transverse skid racks 24 and 25 is the section beam 2. Movement in the longitudinal direction is restricted by the vertical member of said skid racks. Movement in the transverse direction is restricted by the arcuate flange clamping means 29, 30, 3| and 32. The clamping means 29 and 3| are fixedly secured to the underside of the trans-" verse members l6 and I! and the clamping means 30 and 32 are rotatably mounted thereon. As shown there are two arcuate flanged clamping means on each of the transverse members. These arcuate clamping means are arranged so that they conform to the shape of the spool on which the filaments or fabrics are wound. They are also placed so that they will resist any movement of the section beam in a transverse direction.

In loading the section beams on the supporting structure, the hingedly mounted transverse members 24 and 25 are rotated counter-clockwise until the pins 33 and 34 on the members 24 and 25 respectively engage in the slot in the freely swingable rack holders or hooks 35 and 33 respectively. The section beam 3 is then lifted by means of a hoist, block and tackle or the like and rolled on the transverse skid membars [8 and [9. The hingedly mounted transverse skid is then lowered until the arcuate flange clamping means 20, 2|, 22 and 23 contact spaced portions of the section beams outer flanges.

Prior to placing the section beam 2 on the transverse skid racks 24 and 25 the arcuate fiange clamping means 30 and 32 are rotated 180 so that they will not obstruct the passage of the section beam 2 on the transverse skid racks 24 and 25. The means by which the arcuate flange clamping'means is rotated is more clearly illustrated in Figure 2. The arcuate clamping means 30 is fixedly secured to a plate member 31 that is rotatably mounted on a threaded shaft 38. The shaft 38 is suitably mounted in bearing-like members 39 and 40 which are secured to the transverse member IS. The portion of the shaft extending from the bearing is machined so that it will fit a standard size socket wrench. Bearing against the bearing-like member 49 on its opposite face is a lock nut 4| which is fixedly secured to the shaft 38 by a cotter pin.

Since the plate 31 is threaded to fit the screw shaft .38, as the shaft 38 is-rotated in a clockwise direction the plate 87 carrying the arcuate clamp 30 will move toward the bearing 49. The screw shaft 38 is rotated until the arcuate flange clamping means 30 is at such a distance as to freely rotate it out of the path of the section beam 2. The clip or guide means 63 forms a slot as a retainer for the locking chocks and prevents them from swinging upward if loosened by vibration in transit. The mechanism operating the arcuate flange clamping means 32 is substantially the same as the mechanism operating the arcuate clamp 38 as described in the foregoing.

In placing the section beam 2 in the supporting rack it is lifted by a chain hoist, a block and tackle or the like and placed on the transverse skid members 24 and 25 until its outer flange contacts the arcuate flange clamping means 29 and 3|. With the section beam in place the arcuate flange clamping means 33 and 32 are rotated 180 and the screw shafts are rotated in a counter-clockwise direction until the arcuate clamps 30 and 32 contact the flanges of the section beam 2.

While preferred embodiments have been shown or described it is to be understood that variations and changes may be made without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention as defined in the'appended claims.

I claim:

1. A rack for supporting cylindrical articles, such as yarn beams, comprising a supporting framework having a pair of fixedly secured transverse members disposed in a generally horizontalplane, a lower pair of swingably mounted transverse members having spaced arcuate retaining elements fixedly secured thereunder, the swingably mounted members being superposed with respect to the first-mentioned pair of members, and an upper pair of fixedly secured transverse members superposed with respect to the hingedly mounted members, each of the upper members having an arcuate retaining element fixedly secured thereunder and an arcuate retaining element mounted thereunder rotatably about an axis generally parallel to the transverse members.

2. A rack for supporting cylindrical articles, such as yarn beams, comprising a supporting framework having a pair of fixedly secured transverse members disposed in a generally horizontal plane, a lower pair of swingably mounted transverse members, each having a pair of spaced arcuate retaining elements fixedly secured thereunder, the swingably mounted members being superposed with respect to the first-mentioned pair of members, and an upper pair of fixedly secured transverse members superposed with respect to the hingedly mounted members, each of the upper members having an arcuate retaining element fixedly secured thereunder and an arcuate retaining element mounted thereunder rotatably about an axis generally parallel to the transverse members.

3. Means as defined in claim 2 comprising screw means for adjusting the rotatably mounted elements toward and away from the elements,

fixed under the upper transverse members.

1. A rack as defined in claim 2 in which there is a fixed lateral member extending along one side of the framework, the swingable transverse members being hingedly mounted at one end thereof on said lateral member, a rigid connection between the swingable transverse members to constrain them to swing as a unit, the upper fixed retaining elements are disposed near the side of the framework provided with the lateral member and the rotatable elements are disposed away from that side of the framework.

5. Means as defined in claim 4 comprising screw means for adjusting the rotatably mounted elements toward and away from the elements fixed under the upper transverse members.

6. A rack as defined in claim 5 comprising hook means carried in an upper part of the framework for releasably engaging the swingable transverse members when such members are swung upwardly during loading or unloading.

JAMES B. McGINN.

REFERENCES CITED The following references areof record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS

Patent Citations
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US1631304 *Jun 15, 1926Jun 7, 1927American Car & Foundry CoTank car
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2743823 *Apr 8, 1953May 1, 1956Breedlove James PAutomatic racking device
US2828023 *Apr 25, 1955Mar 25, 1958American Viscose CorpSingle beam racks
US2843261 *Nov 16, 1955Jul 15, 1958Republie Steel CorpCollapsible container
US2862631 *Dec 31, 1956Dec 2, 1958Kaw Valley Steel CompanySupports for cylindrical members on a transport carrier
US3084803 *Aug 31, 1960Apr 9, 1963Celanese CorpRacks
US3095981 *Jun 22, 1959Jul 2, 1963Acf Ind IncTrailer
US3229825 *Mar 6, 1964Jan 18, 1966Brown Jr John RHogshead cradle
US4344528 *Oct 23, 1980Aug 17, 1982Harsco CorporationProjectile lock assembly
US4600169 *Dec 23, 1983Jul 15, 1986Hughes Aircraft CompanyIntegrated spacecraft cradle and shuttle structure
US4655668 *Jan 24, 1984Apr 7, 1987Harsco CorporationProjectile storage rack with gang lock mechanism
US4958841 *Jun 26, 1989Sep 25, 1990Keen Cletus FGarment hanger caddy cart
US5490603 *Sep 6, 1994Feb 13, 1996Snyder Industries, Inc.Fluid tank apparatus
US5755541 *May 3, 1996May 26, 1998Inter-American Vanguard CorporationDrum transport support system
US6431372 *Jun 25, 1998Aug 13, 2002Ngk Insulators, Ltd.Support unit and assemblied rack for loading long objects
US6685405 *Apr 12, 2001Feb 3, 2004Patrick KetchmarkTransportable unit for earthworking implements
US6854606 *Jan 9, 2003Feb 15, 2005David H. RobertsonMoveable storage and display rack for rolled flooring materials
DE2911128A1 *Mar 21, 1979Oct 2, 1980Alois Kober Kg Zell Am ZillerVerpackungs- und transportbehaelter fuer betonmischer
EP0681966A2 *May 9, 1995Nov 15, 1995National-Standard CompanyStackable dispensing apparatus for wire reels
Classifications
U.S. Classification211/85.5, 410/46, 206/392, 211/85.8, 211/44, 211/59.4
International ClassificationB65D85/00, B65D85/68, B65D85/66
Cooperative ClassificationB65D7/14, B65D85/66
European ClassificationB65D7/14, B65D85/66