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Publication numberUS2593657 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 22, 1952
Filing dateJun 10, 1949
Priority dateJun 10, 1949
Publication numberUS 2593657 A, US 2593657A, US-A-2593657, US2593657 A, US2593657A
InventorsAllyn J Coon, William W Gruel
Original AssigneeInt Harvester Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Air swept crusher for fluorescent light tubes
US 2593657 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

April 1952 A. J. COON ETAL AIR SWEPT CRUSHER FOR FLUORESCENT LIGHT TUBES 2 SHEETSSI'1EET 1 Filed June 10. 1949 A ril 22, 1952 A. J. (300: EI'AL 2,593,657

AIR SWEPT CRUSHER FOR FLUORESCENT LIGHT TUBES Filed June 10. 1949 2 SHEETS-SHEET 2 Jzzr/mziora I 62072 6 lf/zZm difgzwel Patented Apr. 22, 1952 Ara sw'nrr onusnnn FOR FLUORES- CENT LIGHT TUBES Allyn J. Coon, Wauwatosa, and William W. Gruei.

Milwaukee, ,,Wis., assignors to International Harvester Company, a corporation of New Jersey Application June 10, 1949, Serial No. 98,274

4 Claims.

This invention relates to a machine for disposing and reducing light tubes of the fluorescent type.

Fluorescent lights are being used extensively for industrial lighting and many manufacturing plants use hundreds of these units. In buildings where a great many fluorescent lights are used, it is customary to dispose and break up the tubes immediately after they have burned out. Since these tubes generally cannot be reused it is desirable to dispose of them in the quickest time and with a minimum safety hazard to the person handling the tubes. Fluorescent light tubes are generally coated with a beryllium compound which may be in the form of a thin Fig. 2 is a front view in elevation of the disposal. unit shown in Fig. 1, this view having portions of the enclosure of the unit removed to disclose interior parts of a shattering mechanism.

Fig. 3 is a side elevational view of a conventional type of fluorescent light bulb.

coat of dust that adheres to the inner walls of v the tube. The beryllium compounds have been found to produce, under certain circumstances, a toxic reaction when the dust is inhaled or comes in contact with the skin of an individual. During the crushing operation, therefore, the dust particles have a tendency to become suspended in the air so that it is exceedingly difficult to prevent injury to the individual handling the tube when the tube is shattered by a manual operation. It is the prime purpose and object of this invention, therefore, to provide a machine which will quickly and efiiciently break up and reduce fluorescent light tubes in such a manner that the health hazard to the operator is reduced to a complete minimum.

It is another object to provide a disposal unit for quickly and safely shattering fluorescent light bulbs, the unit including a novel combination of elements for removing compounds which may be in suspension within the unit incidental to the shattering of the light tubes.

A further object is to provide an improved disposal unit for shattering fluorescent light tubes, said unit including an exhaust chamber, a reduction chamber provided with a crushing mechanism, and a collection chamber for receiving the shattered elements ofthetube.

A still further object is to provide an improved shattering unit for the disposal of fluorescent light tubes, the unit including-a crushing mecha= nism for destroying the tubes and having in combination therewith a suction fan for removing particles of dust placed in suspension as an in cident to the shattering of the tube.

These and other objects will become more clearly apparent from a reading of the specifica tion when examined in connection with the sheets of drawings.

In the drawings:

Fig. 1 is a side sectional'view through a disposal unit for shattering fluorescent light bulbs;

A fluorescent light tube disposal unit is generally indicated by the reference character 10. The unit [0 includes a ground supported frame structure ll having upwardly extending frame members l2. A sheet metal casing or housing i3 is securely supported on the vertically extending frame members 12. The housing l3 includes an exhaust chamber 14 at its upper end. Positioned beneath the exhaust chamber 14 is a reduction chamber IS in communication with the exhaust chamber M through an opening l5. A collecting chamber I6 is positioned beneath the reduction chamber 15. An opening I! is positioned at the upper front end of the casing l3 and this opening extends longitudinally substantially the length of the casing l3 and is utilized for receiving tubes that are fed to the disposal unit In. The opening I! is normally closed by means of a door or closure member (8 which is hinged to the casing l3 as indicated by the reference character 15. A table 28 is positioned within the exhaust chamber I4. The table 20 is connected to the casing adjacent the opening I! and extends downwardly in an inclined direction toward the reduction chamber 15.

A reduction mechanism 2! is positioned within the reduction chamber I5. The mechanism 2| includes a channel-shaped anvil plate 22 which extends longitudinally within the chamber I5 and is supported at its ends on angle irons 23. The angle irons 23 extend the width of the casing l3 as best shown in Fig. l and are supported on' the frame structure U. The anvil plate 22 includes a vertical impact surface 2a. A hammer 25 is positioned adjacent to the anvil 24, theharnmer 25 being substantially co-cxtensive with the anvil 2!. The hammer 25 is also formed of a channel-shaped member. A shaft 25 extends longitudinally within the reduction chamber 15. The shaft 28 is welded to the hammer 25 as indicated at 21 in Fig. 2. The ends of the shaft 26 are journaled in bearing members 'Zliwhich are supported by the upwardly extending frame members l2. The connection of th e. shaftjt to the hammer 25 is near the upper end of the'hammer. The hammer 25 may, therefore, be pivoted in anarcuate path toward engagement with the vertical impact surface zll 'llloveinent or the hammer 25 is accomplished b'y'a' mechanism" which includes a longltudinally extending shaft 29. The shaft 29 is journaled on bearing members 30 which are in turn supported on the angle irons 23. A V-belt pulley 3| is secured to one end of the shaft 29 and rotation of the V-belt pulley imparts rotating movement to the shaft 29, thereupon actuating a pair of spaced eccentrics 32 which are mounted on the shaft 29. The eccentrics are connected to links 33 which, as shown in Fig. i, are connected to the hammer 25 by means of links 34, only one of these links being shown.

An electric power unit 35 is carried on a support 36, the support 36 being carried by the frame structure U. The power unit 35 includes a drive shaft 31 which is adapted to rotate a drive pulley 38. The drive pulley 38 imparts movement to the V-belt pulley 31 by means of a conventional type of V-belt 39.

It is desired that the enclosure be as completely air-tight as possible and this result is accomplished by the sheet metal housing or casing H which includes an arcuate top hood 40 and sheet metal sides 4|. A wall 42 encloses the front of the casing (13 and this wall extends downwardly over the reduction chamber IS. A hinged cover 43 is connected to the wall 42. the purpose of this cover becoming presently more apparent.

A container 44 is positioned within the collection chamber 16, this container including vertically extending sides 45 and end members 46. The container 44 includes castering wheels 41 which facilitate the removal of the container from the collection chamber IS. The collection chamber [6 is open at its rear and front ends and the container 44 is merely rolled into place underneath the reduction chamber IS. A stop plate 48 is connected to the anvil plate 22, and is adapted to be engaged by the container 44 for limiting the rearward movement of the same when it is rolled into place in the unit. After the container 44 has been moved into position the hinged cover 43 is swung down so that it overlaps one of the ends 46 of the container. The front and rear ends 46 of the container 44 thereby serve to completely enclose the open ends of the collection chamber 18 and thus the sheet metal casing I3 is substantially sealed against the escape of dust particles resulting from the shattering of the fluorescent light tubes. The exhaust chamber I4 is in communication with an exhaust conduit 50. The exhaust conduit 50 is connected to a blower casing which has enclosed therein a suction fan 52. The fan 52 may be rotated by means of any conventional power unit and the fan is so shaped as to create asuction within the conduit 50 whereby particles of dust within the chamber l4 are removed and dispelled to the outside atmosphere by means of an exhaust outlet 53. The unit II) is generally placed in a convenient spot within the factory and the exhaust blower is so situated that the exhaust is to the outer atmosphere remote from the manufacturing plant.

In the operation, the fluorescent light tubes 60 are inserted through the opening i1. After the tube has been inserted the closure member I8 falls over the opening ll, thereby substantially sealing the opening. The tubes 60 traverse down the inclined table 20 whereupon they are directed into the reduction chamber l5. As they enter the chamber they are caught between the impact surface 24 and the hammer 25. The hammer 25 has one end reciprocating 4 or is oscillating up against the impact surface and as the light tube is caught between the hammer and the impact surface it is crushed into fine particles. At that point of the operation a dust consisting mainly of a beryllium compound is usually released and placed in suspension within the unit incident to the crushing operation. The suction fan 52 is sufliciently powerful to immediately withdraw this dust from the exhaust chamber l4 and divert the same to the outer atmosphere whereupon it is safely dispersed into space. The arrows in Figures 1 and 2 indicate that air streams can enter in and around the container 44. the air streams occasioned by the suction fan 52 being directed upwardly between the impact surface 24 and the hammer 25. The shattered elements of the fluorescent tube thereupon fall and are directed into the container 44. When the container 44 'has been filled it may readily and safely be removed and the shattered remains of the tubes may be safely disposed of. It can readily be seen that the unit is substantially enclosed so that any of the dust or other toxic conditions which would result from the shattering of the tube is safely and quickly eliminated without the operator ever handling the tube after he has inserted the same through the opening I].

It is now obvious that applicant has provided a novel disposal unit which can conveniently be placed in any manufacturing establishment using a fluorescent lighting system. It must be understood that various changes and modifications may be made in this construction which do not depart from the spirit of the invention as disclosed nor the scope thereof as defined in the appended claims.

What is claimed is:

1. In a device for reducing fluorescent dust coated elongated light tubes comprising in combination, a frame structure, a casing supported on said frame structure, said casing including an exhaust chamber, a, reduction chamber positioned below said exhaust chamber, said reduction chamber having an opening in communication with said exhaust chamber, said casing including a longitudinally extending tube receiving opening in communication with said exhaust chamber, a movable closure member over the receiving opening, a table positioned within the exhaust chamber adjacent to the receiving opening for receiving tubes. said table extending downwardly in inclined relation toward and adjacent the opening of said reduction chamber for distributing tubes thereto, a crushing mechanism within the reduction chamber, said crushing mechanism including a stationary anvil plate extending substantially the length of said reduction chamber and providing a vertical impact surface, a hammer pivotally connected within the reduction chamber adjacent said impact surface, said hammer having its upper edge positioned adjacent to the opening of said reduction chamber, said hammer being arranged and constructed to reciprocate with respect to said anvil for crushing the elongated tubes against the impact surface, a removable container positioned below the reduction chamber for receiving shattered elements of tubing, and a vacuum exhaust conduit in communication with said exhaust chamber for withdrawing elements placed in suspension within the device incidental to the reduction of the fluorescent tubes from the reduction chamber to the exhaust chamber and outwardly through the exhaust conduit.

2. In a device for reducing fluorescent dust coated light tubes comprising in combination. a frame structure, a casing supported on said frame structure, said casing including an exhaust chamber, a reduction chamber positioned below said exhaust chamber, said reduction chamber having an opening in communication with said exhaust chamber, a longitudinally extending opening formed at the upper end of said casing and in communication with the exhaust chamber, a hinged closure member over the opening, a table positioned within the exhaust chamber adjacent to the opening, said table extending downwardly in inclined relation toward and adjacent to the opening of said reduction chamber, a crushing mechanism within the reduction chamber, said crushing mechanism including a stationary anvil plate extending longitudinally within the reduction chamber and having a vertical impact surface, a hammer having a fiat surface substantially coextensive with said anvil, means pivotally connecting said hammer to said casing for movement about a horizontal axis, said hammer being positioned adjacent to said opening of said reduction chamher the surface of said hammer being movable relative to the surface of the anvil for reducing tubes entering into said reduction chamber, means for moving said hammer including an eccentric connected to said hammer, a container positioned below said reduction chamber for receiving crushed elements of tubing, said container including vertically extending side walls cooperating with said casing for substantially enclosing said reduction chamber, a blower unit, a conduit connected to said blower unit and communicating with said exhaust chamber, said blower unit being constructed and arranged to remove dust placed in suspension within the device incidental to the reduction of said light tubes from the reduction chamber, to the exhaust chamber and through the conduit and said blower unit.

3. In a device for reducing fluorescent dust coated light tubes comprising in combination, a frame structuraa casing supported on the frame structure, said casing including an exhaust chamher, an opening formed in said casing, said opening extending longitudinally with respect to the casing and being in communication with said exhaust chamber. a removable closure for said opening, a table within said exhaust chamber, said table being arranged to receive light tubes delivered through the opening and to divert the tubes from said exhaust chamber, a crushing mechanism adjacent the table for receiving tubes diverted from the exhaust chamher, said crushing mechanism including a stationary anvil plate supported on the frame structure, said anvil plate including a vertical impact surface extending longitudinally and positioned below the exhaust chamber, a hammer substantially coextensive with said impact plate, a shaft connected to the frame structure and extending longitudinally with respect thereo, said shaft being connected to the upper end of said hammer to provide for pivotal movement of said hammer about a longitudinal axis, means for reciprocating said hammer with respect to the impact surface thereby crushing light tubes directed between the impact surface and the hammer including a longitudinally extending shaft journalled on said frame, driving means for rotating said latter shaft, a pair of transversely spaced eccentrics connected to and movable on rotation of said shaft, links connecting said eccentrics to the lower end of said hammer for moving the same, a collecting chamber below said exhaust chamber and in communication therewith for receiving reduced elements of light bulbs, and an exhaust blower in communication with said exhaust chamber for removing dust particles incidental to the reduction of the light tubes from the crushing mechanism.

4. A device for reducing fluorescent dust coated light tubes comprising in combination, a frame structure, a casing supported on said frame structure, said casing including an exhaust chamber, a reduction chamber positioned below said exhaust chamber, said reduction chamber having an opening in communication with said exhaust chamber, a longitudinally extending opening formed at the upper end of said casing and in communication with the exhaust cham her, a hinged closure member over the opening, a table positioned within the exhaust chamber adjacent to the opening, said table extending downwardly in inclined relation toward said reduction chamber, a crushing mechanism in said reduction chamber, said crushing mechanism including a stationary anvil plate extending within the reduction chamber and having a vertical impact surface, a hammer substantially coextensive with said anvil, means pivotally connecting said hammer to said casing for movement about a horizontal axis, said hammer being movable relative to the surface of the anvil for reducing tubes entering into said reduction chamber, means for moving said hammer including an eccentric connected to said hammer, a blower unit, a conduit connected to said blower unit and communicating with said exhaust chamber, said blower unit being constructed and arranged to remove dust placed in suspension within the device incidental to the reduction of said light tubes from the reduction chamber and said exhaust chamber through said conduit.

ALLYN J. COON. WILLIAM W. GRUEL.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 275,675 Livingston Apr. 10, 1883 278,274 Rickerson May 22, 1883 819,312 Ralston May 1, 1906 825,699 Bonsal July 10, 1906 873,081 Philips Dec. 10, 1907 984,758 Gardner Feb. 21, 1911 1,188,323 Richardson June 20, 1916 1,413,116 Hickey Apr. 18, 1922 1,954,465 Watson Apr. 10, 1934 2,027,782 Lundgren Jan. 14, 1936 2,339,596 Wright Jan. 18, 1944 2,426,346 Feight Aug. 26, 1947 FOREIGN PATENTS Number Country Date 26206 Great Britain Dec. 4, 1908 OTHER REFERENCES How to Dispose of Fluorescent Tubes Safely, from Engineering News Record, April 14, 1949, page 64, photostat in 241/99.

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Classifications
U.S. Classification241/47, 241/99, 241/DIG.140, 100/218, 241/100, 241/267, 100/902
Cooperative ClassificationB02C19/0068, Y10S100/902, Y10S241/14
European ClassificationB02C19/00W4