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Publication numberUS2595153 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 29, 1952
Filing dateApr 3, 1951
Publication numberUS 2595153 A, US 2595153A, US-A-2595153, US2595153 A, US2595153A
InventorsGeorge V. Malmgren
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Forecasting calculator
US 2595153 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

April 1952 G. v. MALMGREN 2,595,153

FORECASTING CALCULATOR Filed April 5 1951 2 SHEETSSHEET 2 6. fe'jja 64 INVENTOR George 1/ MaZmyren BY ATTORNEY Patented Apr. 29, 1952 i.

UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE FORECASTING CALCULATOR George V. Malmgren, Chicago, 111.

Application April 3, 1951, Serial No. 218,920 a Claims. (01. 235-87) 'This invention relates to forecasting calculator and it comprises a calculator or forecaster composed of a central shaft forming the inside of the device, an enlargement at one end of said shaft forming a finger grip, an element connected to the opposite end of said shaft provided with a second finger grip, at least one display of data on said shaft arranged in a display of spaced-parallel longitudinal strips around said shaft, at least one annular column of notations on said shaft individually aligned with said data strips, a sleeve rotatably mounted on said shaft between said finger grips provided with anelongated longitudinal window above said display of data strips and with a circular window above said column of notations, the windows being aligned and so arranged that the strips of data together with the aligned notations become visible one-at-a-time through said windows, an outer cylinder rotatably mounted on said sleeve above said elongated window and provided with a spirally arranged series of circular windows which when the cylinder is rotated register oneat-a-time with saidelongated window whereby predetermined segments of said data strips become visible when the data strips are registered with said elongated window and also with said circular windows, the corresponding notations being visible simultaneously through the circular window in the inner sleeve, and means for preventing accidental detachment of the sleeve and the cylinder from the shaft of the forecaster; all as more fully hereinafter set forth and as claimed. I A large amount of enjoyment is obtained by thespectators at a horse race, for example, by looking up the prior records of the various entries and attempting to forecast from these'records which entry will win. Performance charts of thevarious entries are sold to spectators for this very purpose. But most of the betting is doneon .hunches or tips, very few of the spectators making any. attempt to analyze the data .onthe performancecharts in order to forecast the winner. In fact most of the spectators would .not know how to go-about any systematic analysis for the reason that they would not know .the relative weights to be given to the various factors entering into the analysis. While a few mechanical aids to analyses of this type have been proposed from time to time, none of these has met with any widespread acceptance primarily because none has been sufliciently convenientand simple enough to be operated by the-average spectator.

I have discovered that an analysis sufiiciently accurate and detailed for the average spectator can be made with the use of a forecasting device which can be made simply and cheaply. In this device there are employed data in the form of a series of segmented longitudinal strips of colors, such as red and green, the segments varying in color and being arranged in annular'dlsplays on the central shaft of the calculator. The data also includes annular columns of notations aligned individually with the colored strips which relate to the change in class of the contestant since its last race, the placing of the contestant in its last race etc. An independently rotable sleeve is'provided outside the central shaft, this sleeve provided with circular windows above the said columns of notations, which therefore come into view one-at-a-time when the said sleeve is rotated with respect to the shaft, and with elongated longitudinal windows aligned with the circular windows above the colored strips. The

device also comprises a plurality of outer cylinders rotatably mounted on the sleeve above the elongated windows and having circular windows arranged in a spiral which, when aligned with said elongated windows and with said colored strips expose to view variously colored segments of said strips. These cylinders may bear legends, such as elapsed days since prior race, maximum lengths behind, number of wins etc. The circular windows are then provided with numbers representing 4 days, 6 days etc. and 1 length, 2 lengths, etc. and 1 win, 2 wins etc. so that, when the cylinder is rotated to the correct number a color segment will be displayed which will give the proper weight to the data in question.

The notations in the annular columns mentioned above, which may relate to the change in class of the contestant, etc. become visible oneat-a-time through the circularwindows in the inner sleeve of the forecaster when the latter is rotated with respect to the shaft. For this reason it is not necessary for these circular windows to be covered by an outer cylinder of the type used tocover the elongated windows. That is, the cylinders which cover the elongated windows may be spaced from the circular windows of the sleeve, that portion of the sleeve which includes the circular windows constituting the outer portion of the assembled forecaster. A somewhat more simple construction results, however, by the use of cylinders which cover the entire sleeve between its end finger grips. In this case annular windows must be provided in the cylinder portions which cover the circular windows in the inner sleeve. If the cylinders are made of plastic the annular windows may constitute transparent annular strips in an opaque plastic.

My invention can be explained in greater detail by reference to the accompanying drawing which shows, more or less diagrammatically two embodiments of my forecaster which can be used in forecasting the outcome of horse or other racing. In this showing:

Fig. l is an elevational view of one form of forecaster with all parts assembled,

Fig. 2 is an elevation, partly in longitudinal section, of the central shaft and the pencilholding element of the forecaster of Fig. l in assembled condition,

Fig. 3 is an elevational view, partly in section, of the slotted full-length sleeve which fits over the central shaft shown in Fig. 2,

Fig. 4 is an exploded or expanded view of the data-holding sheets which are secured around the central shaft of the forecaster of Figs. 1 to 3,

Fig. 5 is an expanded view of the three cylinders which, when the forecaster is assembled, fit over the full-length sleeve of Fig. 2,

Fig. 6 is an elevational view of a modified forecasting device with all parts assembled,

Fig. '7 is an elevation, partly in longitudinal section, of the central shaft and detachable front end of the modified device,

Fig. 8 is an elevational view, partly in section, of the sleeve which fits over the central shaft of this modification, while Fig. 9 is an expanded view of the three outer cylinders which fit over the. sleeve when the forecaster is assembled.

In the various views like parts are designated by like reference numerals. Referring first to the modification of Figs. 1 to 5, my forecaster comprises an assembly of several different elements. At its core there is a central shaft or rod shown generally at I in Fig. 2, which is provided at its rear end with an enlarged knurled knob 2 which may hold an eraser 3, and which at its forward end is provided with a central bore 4 which receives the lead 5- of the lead-holding front element shown generally at 6. The leadholding' element comprises the conventional tapered tip at its forward end which receives and holds the lead 5 in adjustable position, the details of this element forming no part of the present invention. At its rear end thelead-holding elementhas a sleeve 9 which is counterbored as at H) to receive the forward end of the shaft The front end of shaft I abuts the shoulder H at the bottom of the counterbore. The shaft fits into the counterbore with a tight fit or, if desired, it may be screwed into or otherwise secured to this element. The lead-holding element is also provided with a knurled ring 8 which can be used, alternatively with the knob 2, for holding the central shaft of the pencil stationary while the sleeve 2| and cylinders 23, 24 and 25 mounted thereon are being rotated. The shaft is provided with narrow annular raised sections l2,

I3 and M, which may have the same outer diameter as the sleeve 9 of the pencil-holding element. The data-bearing sheets l5, l6 and I1, shown in Fig. 4 are mounted around and adhered to the shaft between the shoulders formed at either end of these raised sections. These data sheets may be made of paper or plastic or the data may be embossed, painted or enameled directly on the recessed portions l8, l9; and, 2ll of the shaft The thickness of the data sheets is slightly less than that of the raised sections |2, l3 and I4 so that when the sleeve 2|, shown in Fig. 3, is slipped over the shaft I, these raised sections form bearings for the sleeve. At its forward end the sleeve 2| bears on the sleeve 9 of the lead-holding element 5. The sleeve 2| has an integral raised collar 22 which extends flush with the outer surface of the forecaster when fully assembled, as shown in Fig. 1. This collar may be used as a finger grip to hold the sleeve when it is rotated with respect to the shaft. The sleeve is also provided with two apertures or windows 29 at its forward end and three longitudinal slots or elongated windows 3|, 32 and 33 in line with the holes. These openings serve as windows. The forecaster is also equipped with three rotatable cylinders 23, 24 and 25 shown in Fig. 5 in expanded form. These cylinders fit over the inner sleeve 2| rather loosely so they can be readily rotated. In assembled position the front end of the foremost cylinder 25 bears against the raised portion 22 of sleeve 2| while the rear end of the rearmost cylinder 23 bears against the knob 2, as shown in Fig. l. The cylinders may be provided with the legends which are indicated in Figs. 1 and 5 of the drawing or with any other legends which may be useful. The cylinders 23, 24 and 25 are also provided with series of holes (short windows) 2B, 21 and 28 respectively, which are arranged in a spiral and when rotated are adapted to expose to view segments of the colored markings on the data-holding sheets |5, I6 and Il, respectively. In similar manner the windows 29 in the foreward end of tube 2| are adapted to expose to view notations, such as the letters 30, namely 0 O, O D etc. at the foreward end of data-holding sheet IT. The holes 29 rotate with the sleeve 2| while the holes 26, 21 and 28 are independently rotatable with the cylinders.

The various parts of the forecaster of Figs. 1 to 5 are assembled as follows: The cylinder 25 is first slipped over the rear end of sleeve 2| and then cylinders 24 and 23are slipped on in similar manner so that the front end of sleeve 25 bears against the raised section 22 of the sleeve 2|. The data sheets I5, I6 and I! are adhered to the central shaft I over the recessed portions l8, l9 and 2|], respectively. The lead-holding portion 6 is then separated from the shaft the rear end of sleeve 2 with its assembled cylinders 23, 24 and 25, is slipped over the forward end of shaft until the rear end of sleeve 2| and cylinder 23 both abut the knob 2. Then the rear end of the lead-holding portion 5 is slipped into the front end of the sleeve 2|, which extends beyond the shaft l. The front end of the shaft is forced ordriven into the counterbore l0 until it abuts the shoulder The pencil is then assembled as shown in Fig. l.

When the forecaster is assembled the sleeve 2| may be rotated on the shaft by grasping its raised portion 22 or its forward exposed end with one hand While the other hand rotates the knurled knob 2 or the knurled ring 8 at the front end of the pencil. When the shaft is rotated countor-clockwise with respect to sleeve 2|, as seen from the front of the pencil, the notations O O, O D, O U, X 0, X D and X U, come into view successively through the holes 29. And if the sleeves 23, 24 and 25 are rotated while the shaft and sleeve 2| are held from rotating, the various colors on the; sheets 5, l6 and I1 come into view through the holes 26, 21 and 28, respectively.

Owing to the slots 3|, 32 and 33 in the sleeve 2|, which slots are in line with the holes 29, it is possible to see color through only one hole at a tlmeon each of the three cylinders 23, 24 and 25 these holes being those which register with the slots 3|, 32 and 33, respectively. The colors seen are those which are on the colored strips in line with the particular notations visible through holes 29. Thus, if the notation O O is visible through the holes 29,-the colored strips 34, 35 and 36 are in registry with the slots 3|, 32 and 33, respectively. It is therefore evident that under these circumstances the color green will be visible through the holes marked 4 days, 6 days, 8 days and 10 days of cylinder 25, while through the other three holes on this cylinder the color red will become visible as the cylinder is rotated counter-clockwise. In a similar manner the forward 4 holes of cylinder 24 marked 1, 2, 3 and 4, respectively, will show green as they pass over the strip 35, while the 4 rearward holes will show red. In the same manner the first two holes of cylinder 23 will show green while the last three holes will show red. It is obvious, of course, that the data sheets |5, I6 and I! can be changed to others with different color combinations on them so that any desired colors can be shown through the holes of the sleeves l5, I6 and H as these sleeves are rotated. The forecaster can therefore be made to give conservative predictions or speculative forecasts or any degree inbetween.

A modification of my forecasting device is shownin Figs. 6 to 9. In this modification the pencil point is dispensed with and this element is replaced with a removable knob 10 constituting 1-1 a front element. As in the pencil holding modification a central shaft |a (Fig. '7) is provided which may be of metal or plastic. The various notations and color strips which in the pencil modification were displayed on separate data sheets |5, I6 and II, are here embossed or imprinted directly on the central shaft Ia, as at 34a, 35a, 36a and 30a. A sleeve 2|a (Fig.8), which may be of metal or plastic, is rotatably mounted on the central shaft and, when assembled, fits inside the bore H of knob 10 with a driving fit, so that the sleeve turns with this knob. The central shaft at one end is provided with an integral knob 2a while the other end of the shaft is journaled in the bore 12 of knob 10, so that the shaft turns with the knob 2a and independently of knob 10. The sleeve 2|a can be formed of an opaque plastic provided with transparent longitudinal windows 3m, 32a and 33a, which have the same shape and take the place of the slots 3|, Hand 33 of the sleeve shown in Fig. 3. The holes 29 of the sleeve of Fig. 3 are then replaced by transparent circular shorter windows 29a. ,If sleeve 2 hr is made of metal the windows are. openings as in the pencil modification.

The modification of Figs. 6 to 9 is also provided with 3 outer sleeves 23a, 24a. and 25a. These are of a plastic which is rendered opaque with the exception of transparent circular (short) windows 2%, 21a and 28a which are arranged in a spiral and spaced exactly like the corresponding holes 26, 21 and 28 in the pencil modification. The sleeve 25a, at its left end is provided with two transparent annular strips or windows which are positioned directly above the windows 29a and notations 30a so that the latter become visible as the sleeve 2| is rotated. It will be noted that the annular windows I3 and the circular windows 29a cooperate to per-,-

form the same functions as the openings 29 of the pencil modification of my device. This modified construction enables the device to be shortened since the raised portion 22 of the pencil modification can be eliminated.

In order to retain the parts of the device in assembled condition. that is, to prevent the knob 10 and sleeve 2 la from slipping off the shaft la. a retaining screw M (Fig. 7 can be providedin knob lllythe end of which enters an annular slot 15 provided at the end of shaft Ia. It is necessary to retract screw 14 before shaft la can be separated from knob". The color strips and various. notations employedwith the plastic modificae tion of my forecaster can be identical with those. of the pencil or metal modification, ifdesired'. In Fig. 9 the cylinders 23a, 24a and 25a are indicated as being in the color black where not pros vided with windows. Any color can be 'used, of course, provided that it is relatively. opaque.

The plastic'modification of my devicehas several advantages over the metal or pencil modification. Owing to the fact that the outer sleeves 23a, 24a and 25a, as well as the inner sleeve .2|a, are imperforate, there is less opportunity for dust and dirt to get into the device.v ..The: notations and color strips therefore keep. cleaner. .z-The weight of the device is reduced substantially. The plastic modification also uses less .critical' material and can be made somewhat more cheaply.

In order to assemble the plastic modification sleeve 2 |a is first slipped over shaft -|'a.,. outer cyi-v inders 23a, 24a and 25a are then slipped on over sleeve 2|a and finally knob 10 is pressed tightly over the end of the sleeve 2|a. The retaining screw 14 is then turned until its end enters slot 15 while still permitting the two knobs to be turned independently. In use as a forecaster the plastic modification can be operated exactly as the metal modification.

The particular notations and legends shown in the drawing adapt my forecaster to indicatethe possibility of an entry in a race winning the race.

. based on the past records of the entry. In, the

case of horse racing the rules which accompany the forecaster may recommend that it should not be used to analyze the performance of maidens and two or three year olds, with the exception of the case where the three year olds are entered with older participants. If-two entries in the same contest have been considered as outstanding, either of which has been scratched within the past two days, or which have been selected by the forecaster in the last two days and los't',' neither of these entries should be considered in that particular contest. Entries which have not been in competition for the last sixty days should not be analyzed. The ,data as reported on the performance charts should be employed in operating the forecaster. I c

While various directions to be followed in op'er ating the forecaster can be devised the following represents one set of directions found to be met tic'al:

1. If the contestant to be analyzed finishe'dflts last contest in fourthplace or worse and sin or. more lengths behind first place, the notation 071 should appearat the window A" on the pencil; otherwise set the pencil so that fX appears at this window.

2. Set B at 0" when the class change since last contest is less than athousand dollars. In allowance races an alphabetical advance or drop shall be considered as a rise or drop inclass '3. Set B at "ID" if the class of contestant has increased since last contest a thousand dollars or more.

4. Set at U if class of contestant has increased since last contest a thousand dollars or more;

5. Retain the reading of. A while setting B.

6. .Revolve the cylinder at left marked Elapsed Days" until a color appears at the side of the numeral nearest the number of elapsed days since the last contest.

.-.7.,.Revolve the middle cylinder marked "MaximumLengths Behind" until a color appears at the side of the numeral indicating the maximum lengths the contestant has trailed first place'in any of its five previous contests.

.8. Revolve the cylinder at the right until a color appears at the side of the numeral indicating the total number of wins in the contestants last five contests.

9. Check all settings to insure accuracy.

Favorable results may be anticipated if each of the three windows in the cylinders show green.

Unfavorable results may be anticipated if any one of the three windows shows red. If two of the windows show green and one shows red the forecast is not entirely unfavorable.

While I have described what I consider to be the best embodiments of my forecaster, itis evident, of course that various modifications can be made in the specific structures which have been described without departing from the purview of this invention. Thus it is possible to use more or less than three cylinders on my forecaster with properly colored data strips beneath. It is also possible to use a single window or more than two windows in the full-length sleeve with various annular columns of notations beneath. It is also possible to use my forecaster as a calculating device to teach children to learn the multiplication table, for example. In this case the numbers to be multiplied (multiplicands) are arranged in an annular column beneath a window 29, the multipliers are indicated adjacent the windows 21 on one of the cylinders while the answers are on the data sheet beneath this cylinder. A second cylinder and a second annular column of numbers can be used for division. Other modifications of my invention which fall within the scope 'of the following claims will be immediately evident to those skilled in this art.

What I claim is:

1. A forecaster comprising a central shaft, a sleeve rotatably mounted on said shaft, said sleeve being provided with a plurality of windows which are an aligned and part of which are elongated longitudinally while others are circular, annular columns of notations on said shaft beneath said circular windows, spacedparallel strips of data on said shaft beneath said longitudinal windows grouped in annular displays, one display for each of said longitudinal windows, the strips in the several displays being aligned with each other and with corresponding notations, a plurality of plastic cylinders rotatably mounted on said sleeve, one cylinder being provided for each longitudinal window and for eachdisplay of data strips, said cylinders being opaque but being-provided with a series of transparent circular windows registering with said longitudinal windows and arranged in spiral so that as a cylinder is rotated predetermined segments of a data strip become Visible through said transparent windows when the latter are in registrywith said elongated windows and with said strip of data, at least one of said cylinders also being provided with annular transparent strips above the circular windows of said innersleeve so that the notations corresponding to said strip of data remain visible as the cylinder is r0 tated, means for preventing accidental detach ment of said sleeve and said cylinders from said shaft and means for rotating said shaft with respect to said sleeve.

2. A forecaster comprising a central shaft, spaced parallel strips of data mounted longitudinally on said shaft and grouped in at least three annular displays, the strips of data in each display being aligned with corresponding strips of data in the other displays, annular columns of notations also mounted on said shaft, the said notations being aligned individually with said strips of data, a sleeve rotatably mounted on said shaft, said sleeve being provided with a row of elongated windows and of shorter windows, one of said elongated windows being provided for each. annular display of data strips and one of said shorter windows being provided for each of said columns of notations, the length of said elongated windows corresponding to the length of said data strips, said row of windows being adapted simultaneously to expose to view a strip in each of said displays of data and their corresponding aligned notations one-at-a-time as the sleeve is rotated with respect to said shaft, at least three independently rotatable cylinders mounted on said sleeve above each of said elongated windows, said cylinders being provided with a series of short windows arranged in a spiral so that as each cylinder is rotated on said sleeve predetermined segments of a data strip therebeneath become visible through said short win: dows when the latter are in registry with said elongated windows and with said data strip, means for preventing accidental detachment ,of

said sleeve and said cylinders from said shaft and means for rotating said shaft with respect to'said sleeve.

3. A forecaster comprising a central shaft, a sleeve rotatably mounted on said shaft, said sleeve being rovided with a longitudinal row of windows part of which are elongated longitudi-' nally and part of which are shorter, annular columns of notations on said shaft beneath said shorter windows, spaced-paralle1 strips of data on said shaft beneath said elongated windows grouped in annular displays, one display for each of said elongated windows, the strips of data -in the several displays being aligned with each other and with corresponding notations so that the notations and strips of data become visible through said windows simultaneously and one-' at-a-time as the sleeve is rotated with respect to the shaft, a plurality of cylinders mounted for independent rotation on said sleeve, one cylinder being provided for each of said elongated windows and for each display of data strips, said cylinders being opaque but being provided with a series of transparent short windows registering with said longitudinal windows and arranged in a spiral so that as a cylinder is rotated predetermined segments of a'data strip become visible through said transparent windows when the latter are in registry with said elongated windows and with said strip of data, at least one of said cylinders being also provided with annular transparent strips above the shorter windows of said inner sleeve so that thenotations corresponding tosaid strip'of data remain visible as the cylin:

der is rotated, means for preventing accidental detachment of said sleeve and said cylinders from said shaft and means for rotating said shaft with respect to said sleeve.

GEORGE V. MALMGREN.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

10 UNITED STATES PATENTS Name Date Walker June 8, 1909 Walker July 9, 1929 Reese Nov. 18, 1941 FOREIGN PATENTS Country Date France May 3, 1938 France Mar. 1, 1937

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US924406 *Jun 6, 1908Jun 8, 1909Alexander WalkerPencil-case and other cylinder.
US1720499 *Jul 1, 1926Jul 9, 1929William WalkerEducational computing device
US2262818 *Oct 2, 1939Nov 18, 1941Berthold J ReeseDevice for pencils or the like
FR48846E * Title not available
FR813546A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3880349 *Sep 26, 1973Apr 29, 1975James Richard HarteCylindrical calculator
US4133031 *Apr 20, 1977Jan 2, 1979Esrac Computer CorporationElectronic speed rating calculator and method
US4369358 *Apr 8, 1981Jan 18, 1983William AdamsTable correlating device for scuba divers
US4984494 *Oct 23, 1989Jan 15, 1991Yang Ming JerTuning pen
US4996381 *Oct 7, 1988Feb 26, 1991Mobil Oil Corp.Increased conversion of C2 -C12 aliphatic hydrocarbons to aromatic hydrocarbons using a highly purified recycle stream
US6742953May 20, 2002Jun 1, 2004Bic CorporationWriting instrument with display window
Classifications
U.S. Classification235/87.00R
Cooperative ClassificationB43K29/093