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Publication numberUS2595770 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 6, 1952
Filing dateMay 5, 1948
Publication numberUS 2595770 A, US 2595770A, US-A-2595770, US2595770 A, US2595770A
InventorsR. E. Crossley
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Eotating beacon having independent
US 2595770 A
Abstract  available in
Images(4)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

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4 Sheets-Sheet l R. E. CROSSLEY ET AL ROTATING BEACON HAVING INDEPENDENTLY ADJUSTABLE LIGHT UNITS RETRACTABLY MOUNTED FOR SERVICING I I. ...n-.nn

May 6, 1952 Filed May 5, 1948 27 lll 2 5 lli I.

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May 6, 1952 R. E. cRossLEY ETAL 2,595,770

ROTATING BEACON HAVING INDEPENDENTLY ADJUSTABLE LIGHT UNITS RETRACTABLY MOUNTED FOR SERVICING Filed May 5, 1948 4 Sheets-Sheet I5 fax/mm @ttor-'V195 May 6, 1952 R. E. cRossLEY ETAL 2,595,770

ROTATING BEACON HAVING INDEPENDENTLY ADJUSTABLE LIGHT UNITS RETRACTABLY MOUNTED FOR SERVICING Filed May 5, 1948 4 Sheets-Sheet 4 Fl E- 7 WM uw atented May 6, 19.52i

ROTATING BEACON HAVING'INDEPENDENT- LY ADJUSTABLE LIGHT UNITS RETRACT- ABLY MOUNTED Fon ssavroiNG Ryal- E. Crossley, Fayetteville, and Harlow M. Pattat', North` Syracuse, N. Y., assignors to Crouse-Hir'ldsv Company, Syracuse, N. Y.; a corporation of New York Appueaumiuay 5, 194s, serial No. 25,118 4 claims. (ci. 24e-49) l Y This invention relates to a lighting unit of the revolving. beacon type intended primarily for use' in lighthouses and the like.

The invention has as an object a beacon structure of the type referred to embodying an optical system by' which the beacon has a. relatively high light output with a relatively low' wattage consuxnption.

The invention has asv al further object a beacon structure embodying a plurality of light projecting units, each u nit projecting two light beams in angular relation,v and each unit being independently adjustable for any desired angular spacing of the. light beams of one unit relative to the beams ofthe other units.

The invention has as a further object a lighting unit embodying a structure particularly well suited for mounting on the roof, or deck, cfa building or the. like, and having means whereby the. unit may be relamped, or repaired, from within the structure. Y

The invention consists in the novel features and inthe combinations and constructions hereinafter set forth and claimed.

In describing this invention, reference is had to the accompanying drawings in which like characters designate corresponding parts in all the views.

Figure 1- is an elevational view, partly in section, of a' lighting unit embodying my invention.

Figure 2 isa view, similarto Figure 1, ofthe lower portion of the structure.

Figure S'is a view taken on line 3-3, Figure l.

Figure Llis a view taken on line 4 4, Figure 2.

Figure` 5 is a. diagrammatic view illustrating the -arrangementsof the reflectors inthe lighting units.

Figure 6 is aschematic diagram illustrating A the lighting units adjusted to beam spacing.

Figure '7 is afview similar to Figure 6, with the light units adjusted to eect interlacing oi the beams.

give a uniform The beacon comprises a weathertight transparent casing-consisting of a ringZ' mounted on a roof, vor deck structure 2|, the ring being mounted uponthe margin about an opening 22 in the deck; A pluralityv OYuprigh't'members 23 are mounted upon the ring 20', as by screws 24. An annular member 25 issecured to the' upper ends of'the' uprights 23, and larseries ofuprlghts 26" extendupwardly fromftlie member 25j and are. secured'at-their upper ends'to an annular member 21. Transparent panels 28 are interposed between the ring 2G and the annular member 25',v and between the annular members' 25, 21, the panels being detachably'secured to uprights 23,' 26; by clamps 36; A cap 3| isA detachably secured to thev upper annular'member 21, as by screws 32.l This structure forms an enclosed cy- 2 lindrical housing having. a transparent side wall.

A plurality of supports or posts 36 vdepend from the under 'side of the deck 2l. Preferably, these posts terminate in feet 37 mounted on the floor below the deck. A carriage is mounted on the supports 36 for vertical'movement, and the lighting units are mounted upon this carriage. The carriage consists of a U-shaped member lill having a pai-r o1 rollers 4l journalled ineach end of the member 4U on pins d2. The rollers di' are of spool formation and arranged to engage opposite sides of the posts 6'. One or more depending braces 44 are secured to the member de, as by screws d5. The lower end of Vthe brace 44 is likewise provided with rollersY di. A The carriage is completed by a `second U-shaped bracket i8 secured at its ends tothe intermediate portion of the member 4G, see Figure 4, the member d3 having a depending arm 9 also provided with rollers il engaging the third support 36; The carriage, and thelighting unitscarried' thereby, are counterbalanced by a weight 56 secured to a iiexible'strand 5I passing over a sheave 52 and secured to an eye bolt 53 mounted on the member 49.

The light projecting apparatus consists of two units, one superimposed upon the other, both units being rotatably supported by a' spindle journalled vertically in a housing 54 secured to the member lill, as by screws 55. The spindle 56 is journalled in the housing on'antifriction bearings 57, 53.

A gear i is secured tothe lower end ofthe spindle 56 and meshes withv a gear 6I secured to the output shaft 62 of ,a gear reductionV 63 mounted on the housing 54; A motor S4; also carried bythe housing, is operatively connected to the gear reduction 63 and in this manner rotation is imparted to the spindle 56. AY plate 65 is secured to the upper end off the spindle,

and a sleeve-or cylindrical member 65 is'aiiixed to the plate 65H and depends therefrom; The

sleeve t5 is` supported by the -upper bearing 5l and is spaced radially outwardlyl from the upper end of the spindle providing an annular passage 61 between the sleeve and the spindle Tlie-plateY $5 is formedwitha plurality of ape itu-res 63."` p

The housing 513 'is also formed with anfelongatedopening over which a cover'plate GS' is secured, as by screwsV lil. A plate li of insulatingmaterial is detachably mounted on ribsVv 'I'Zformedcnthe inner walls of the housing, and a plurality ei' brush holders 'i3 are mounted upon the plate 1I. Each brush holder carries a brush 'M engaging a split contact ring 'lclampedabout-the spindle, as by screws 76. The rings T5 areinsulated` from the spindle 56 by an insulating sleeve l?. Current is furnished to the respective brushes. througha lead and conductors, not shown,` extend from the respective collar rings 'l5 upwardly through the passage 61 and aperture 6B into the lighting units, whereby the lamps 80, providing the light source for the units, are energized during the rotation of the units.

As previously stated, the light projecting apparatus consists of two separate units. A plate 82 is detachably secured to the plate 65, as by screws 83. A plurality of uprights 84 extend upwardly from the periphery of the plate 82, and a plate 85 is secured to the upper ends of the uprights 84. A plate 80 is mounted upon the top plate 85 coaxially therewith. The plates 85, 86 are secured together as by a bolt 81 which forms an axis about which the plate 85 may be rotated for adjustment relative to the plate 85. The plates 82, 85, and the connecting uprights 84 form the framework for one of the lighting units. The framework of the upper unit c-onsists of the plate 86, uprights88, and a top plate 89.

Each lighting unit further includes a pair of reflecters 90, 9|. These reflectors are mounted in brackets 93 formed on an annular member 94, the reflectors being detachably secured to the brackets by holding clips 95. The members 94 are in turn mounted upon annular members 95 secured to the upper and lower plates 82, 95 and 88, 89, as by angle brackets 91, see Figure l. The members 93 are mounted on the members 96 by studs 99 to provide for proper adjustment of the reflectors.

In each unit, the reflectors 98, 9|, are arranged in angular relation. As shown in Figures 3 and 5, the reflectors are arranged at right angles and the focal points of the reflectors are coincident A to the light source represented by the lamp 80.

With this arrangement, two beams are projected from each unit, the axis of the beams being 90 apart, as lill, |02, for one of the units, E93, 04, for the other unit.

Each unit is also and preferably provided with a spread lens arranged opposite each of the reflectors 99, 9|. From the description thus far, it will be apparent that both the upper and lower lighting units are rotated in synchronism by motor 64 and during such rotation each unit projects two beams spaced 90 apart. If the upper unit is adjusted about the pivot bolt 8l so that its reflectors 90, 9|, are positioned 90 relative to the reilectors of the lower unit, the beacon structure will, during rotation, project four beams of light spaced apart uniformly, as shown in Figure 6. If the upper unit is so adjusted that its reflectors are in registration with the reflectors of the lower unit, the beacon structure will project two beams of light spaced 90, or the units may be adjusted to interlace the beams, as shown in Figure '7. Accordingly, it will be apparent that a number of beam combinations can be obtained by adjusting one unit relative to the other. These beacons are often used to transmit, by the beam arrangement, signals indicating the location of the particular beacon.

The structure described is particularly well adapted to be mounted on the roof or deck of a building, such as a lighthouse, and the lighting units quickly and conveniently made available for relamping, repair, or adjustment, from within the building.

What we claim is:

1. A beacon structure including an open bottom casing formed with transparent side walls, a support positioned below said casing, a carriage mounted on said support and movable vertically toward and from the casing, a lighting unit journalled on said carriage on a vertical axis, a

second lighting unit superimposed upon said iirst unit, each of said units including a light source and a reflector operable to project a beam laterally, the beam of said upper unit being adjustable about the vertical axis in angular relation to the beam of the lower unit, and means operable to effect rotation of said upper and lower units in synchronism.

2. A beacon structure including an open bottom casing formed with transparent side walls, a support positioned below said casing, a carriage mounted on said support, a lighting unit mounted on said carriage, a second lighting unit superimposed on said rst unit and being adjustable about a vertical axis relative to said rst unit, said carriage being movable vertically on said support to move said lighting units into and out of said casing, and means carried by the carriage and operable to eiect rotation of said units in synchronism.

3. A beacon structure including an open bottom casing formed with transparent walls, a support positioned below said casing, a carriage mounted on said support, a spindle journalled in said carriage on a vertical axis, a lighting unit mounted on the upper end of said spindle, a second unit superimposed on said rst unit, each of said units including a light source anda reflector, said upper unit being adjustable about a vertical axis relative to the lower unit, said carriage being movable vertically on said support to move said lighting units into and out of said casing, and means carried by the carriage and operable to ei'ect rotation of said spindle.

4. A beacon structure including an open bottom casing formed with transparent walls, a support mounted below said casing, a carriage mounted on said support, a spindle journalled in said carriage on a vertical axis, a lighting unit mounted on the upper end of said spindle, a second lighting unit superimposed upon said lirst unit, each of said units including a pair of parabolic reflectors, the focal axis of one reflector of each pair extending in angular relation to the focal axis of the other reflector of said pair, and the focal points of the reflectors of each pair being coincident, and each of said units also including a single light source positioned in the common focal point of both reilectors of the pair, said upper light unit being adjustable about the Vertical. axis relative to the lower unit, said carriage being movable vertically on said support to move said units into and out of said casing,

. and means operable to effect rotation of said spindle.

ROYAL E. CROSSLEY. HARLOW M. PATTAT.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the le of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS

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US782297 *Mar 5, 1904Feb 14, 1905Wellman Seaver Morgan CorpMounting for search-lights.
US782644 *Jun 20, 1904Feb 14, 1905Waterbury Clock CoAutomatic pinion-filling machine.
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4124880 *Jun 11, 1976Nov 7, 1978International Telephone And Telegraph CorporationRotating signal light
US5091828 *Aug 7, 1989Feb 25, 1992Public Safety Equipment, Inc.Light bar
Classifications
U.S. Classification362/35, 340/983
Cooperative ClassificationF21V21/30