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Publication numberUS2596314 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 13, 1952
Filing dateApr 21, 1948
Priority dateApr 21, 1948
Publication numberUS 2596314 A, US 2596314A, US-A-2596314, US2596314 A, US2596314A
InventorsWales Nathaniel B
Original AssigneeInd Patent Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Automatic support for flatirons
US 2596314 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

May 13, 1952 N. B. WALES AUTOMATIC SUPPORT FOR FLATIRONS Filed April 21, 1948 INVE%% Patented May 13, 1952 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE AUTOMATIC SUPPORT FOR FLATIRONS Nathaniel B. Wales, New York, N. Y., assignor to Industrial Patent Corporation, New York, N. Y.

Appiication April 21, 1948, Serial No, 22,359

6 Claims. 1

This invention relates to an automatic safety iron.

One of the objects of this invention is to achieve a forget-safe iron so that if the operator fails to up-end the iron after use, or to turn off the electric current, or place the iron on a holder, no fire damage will ensue. The only action necessary for perfect safety is the release of the handle of the iron by the operator.

A further object is to provide a cold-lock" on an iron, or means to automatically maintain the retraction of the elevating element in the iron during a period of non-use so that it may be compactly stored, but only after it has cooled to a safe temperature.

Another object is to provide automatic means so that when the operator connects the iron to an electric outlet, the elevating element being in a retracted position, the iron will automatically elevate itself from the ironing board, or the like before its sole-plate has reached a scorching temperature.

A further object is to provide a predetermined timed interval after the operator releases the handle of the iron before it elevates itself so that if the operator desires to use both hands to shift the position of the piece being ironed the iron will remain in its normal position for a period of approximately six seconds before it elevates itself to its temperature-safe position even though the operator has released the handle.

Another object is to use a pedestal type of support element which in projecting from or through the sole-plate of the iron minimizes the reduction of the area of effective ironing of the sole-plate as compared to a flat foot type of support.

Further objects and pertinent details will be more specifically described and illustrated in the accompanying specifications and drawings in which similar numerals refer to similar parts:

Figure 1 is a side elevation partly in section, taken on line I--l in Figure 3, showing the supporting element in its extended position to elevate the iron from the operative surface.

Figure 2 is a view similar to Figure 1 showing the supporting element retracted and the iron in its normal operative position.

Figure 3 is an end elevation in section, taken on line 3-3 in Figure 2, to show the fulcrumed bifurcated actuating member which biases the supporting member of the iron on its under side by means of a rolling contact against a resilient pivotal element some parts being omitted.

Figure 4 is an enlarged sectional elevation of a dash-pot type of delayed action mechanism.

In Figure l, numeral I is the sole-plate of the electric iron. The electric resistance heating element is not shown. Numeral 2 is the body of the iron, 3 is the handle suitably secured thereto. An L-shaped supporting member or pedestal 4, having a foot piece 5, is retracted into orifice 6 in the sole-plate I, see Figure 2, and is maintained in one of two predetermined positions of full extension or complete retraction by the following components: A boss I secured to the upper side of element 4 centers the lower end of spring 8 which is secured at its upper end by boss 9 to the supporting bar l0 fixed to handle 3. Contacting the underside of supporting element 4 is roller II which acts through its contact with the underside of member 4 as a displaceable fulcrum there: to. Roller II is journaled in the bifurcated arms I 2 of actuating member l3, which is pivoted by pin [4 to handle 3. The length of the bifurcated arms l2 of actuating member [3 is so proportioned from its pivoted point [4 to the contacting surface of roller l I, which bears on the underside of supporting member 4, that spring 8 is under compression. When the contacting pointv of roller H on the underside of element 4 is pOSitioned as is seen in Figure 1 a distance or leverage X to the center line or axis of spring 8 under compression is formed and a downward compressive force is generated on element 4. This compressive force moves element 4 into its extended or support position and maintains it there, see Figure 1. The extended position of pedestal 41s limited by the contacting of the extreme end 4a of pedestal 4 with the inner surface of body 2.

The manually actuated end l5 of actuating member [3 pivoted on pin l4 in recess IS in handle 3 is engaged by spring I! the upper end of which is recessed in handle 3 so that the force of spring I! normally depresses the actuating member l3 to the position as is seen in Figure 1. However, when the handle 3 is manually grasped the fingers of the hand displace element 15 into an approximate position as is seen in Figure ,2, wherein the bifurcated arms l2 of member l3 in which the fulcrum roller H is journaled have been moved clockwise about pivot l4 and consequently roller II has moved to the left along the bottom of support element 4, thereby eliminating torque arm X and creating torque arm Y as the roller II passed over and by the axis Z of spring 8. The support element 4 under the domination of torque Y recedes into the body 2 and foot 5 is forcibly restrained in its receded position as shown. The receding movement being limited by 1 element 4 contacting the body 2 of the iron.

It is to be noted that support element 4 is restrained in its freedom of position within the limits of the deflection of spring 8 during its compression and expansion by boss 1 which enters within spring 8 and is substantially fixed thereto by the constant upward pressure exerted by roller II in either of its two terminal contacting positions with the bottom of element 4. However, to limit the-freedom of support arm 4 within a tolerance so'tha't thefoot may always enter recess 6 in sole-plate I, as well as the relationship of orifice 19 with bi-metallic element l8, which will be described in detail below a fixed rod 2t suitably secured to the body 2 of the iron traverses slot 2| in the extreme end 4a of support member 4 to limit the freedom of support-member ii to an oscillating or rocking action about the axis of the spring 8.

To those skilled in the art it is evident that due to the coordination of spring 8, actuating member l3 andthe biasing contact of the displaceable ful'crumflroller H on element 3, together with spring I! a snap-toggle movement is created using the axis of spring 8 as the neutral point.

The counter force of spring I'i being so proportioned in respectto the force of spring a working through arm Y as seen in Figure 2 that-a very slight contact ofrthe normal gripping position of the hand on the handled and member i5 is sunlcientto maintain pedestali in its'receded; position.

A'thermostatic element H}, which may be a conventional bi-metallic bar is secured to the iron to reflect the temperature of sole-plate l andis so proportioned that when it is deflected .to .a predetermined degree by its temperature it will freelyenterorifioe '19 in support element l -.as is seen in Figure 1, but when its temperature is lowered to a predetermined degree, likewise refleeting the temperature of sole-plate I it forms a stop against the normal extension of element '4 asis seen in full lines in Figure 2 in contrast to its dotted line position which it assumes when sole-plate I is at normal operating temperature.

In this manner after the use of the iron when the operator by grasping handle 3 displaces member I5 and thereby raises support 3 into its retracted position, see Figure 2, ifthe heat responsive-element Hi by its relative cooling normally assumes a position as is seen in full lines in Figure 2 the operatorknows that the iron has cooled to a safe temperature to be stored, as the element I8 has latched the support in its retracted position. Conversely on making preparations to iron, the iron may be deposited on the ironing surface and plugged into'the electric outlet and as the sole-plate l rises in temperature the element [8 is so calibrated as to move into that position by itsincreasing temperature to cause it to unlatch and the iron elevates itself before the sole-plate l reaches scorching temperature.

Referring to Figure 4 instead of spring I! causing an --immed'iate extension of the support member'd on the release of the hand from handle 3 and member I5 a delayed extension of support member 4 may be desirable, so that the operator maybe able toishift the piece being ironed without the iron automatically and immediately elevating itself. A dash "pot giving a predetermined delay factor'may be substituted for spring H. To, accomplish this, using a dash pot, a cylinder 22 secured into a recess in handle 3 is serviced by piston 23. and piston rod- 24 which passes through a cross head 25 in cylinder head :26. Piston-rod 24 is secured to actuating member I5 4 by a ball and socket 21 made with tolerances sufiicient to accommodate the angular relationship of members 3 and I5. A spring 28 is interposed between handle 3 and manual actuating member [5. An inlet valve 29 in cylinder head 26 permits air to enter into cylinder 22 below piston 23 when actuating member 15 is upwardly displaced. Port 3!] permits the upper end of piston 23 to be vented to the atmosphere. When manual actuating member 55 is released the air trapped in cylinder 22 delays the normal return of member l5 under bias of spring 28 to its position asshown in Figure 1. The tolerance between piston rod 24 and cross head bearing 25 may serve topermitsufiicient air leakage therebetween tooccur to return actuating member l5 .over a period of the desired number of seconds.

What I desire to protect by United States Letters Patent is encompassed in the following claims.

I claim:

1. An electric iron comprising a sole plate having an orifice therein, a body secured .to said sole plate,-a handle secured to'said body, 'a-support member journalled at one end'thereof upon said body and having its other end in register with said orifice for projection therethrough to its supporting position, -a movable fulcrum suspended upon the body structure and slidably engagingthe supportmember .on itslundersurface intermediate its lends, a spring eiement under compression connected to'and interposed between afixed part of the body structure and the'upper surface-of thesupport member to bias said support member against the fulcrum, said fulcrum adapted for movement to position the same to either'oneside or the other side of the normal engaging point between said spring element and.

the support member, 'andmanual means for' shifting the fulcrum from one :of its positions to the other, wherebyin one position of thefulcrum the support member under certain conditions'may be moved to project its supporting end through said orifice to lift the iron to its support position and also whereby the support member is retracted within the body structure when the fulcrum is moved to .itsothe'r positionrelative-to said normal engaging point between the spring element and said support member.

2. In an electric iron according to claim 1 and including means to bias said manually shifted fulcrum into its i ronsupport position.

3. In an electric iron'according to'claim "1 including a thermostatic latch thermally-responsive to said sole plate, and wherein said latch assumes a position to engage the support'member to retain said member in i'ts manually retracted position when said sole plate-is-a t a relatively low temperature.

4. In an electric iron according to cl'aiml, including a thermostatic-latch thermally-responsive to said sole plate,-and wherein duringapproximate ironing temperature of the-sole platesald latch will assume a position free from engagement with the support member to permit proper movement of said member for the purposes intended.

5. An electric iron comprising a sole 'plateh'aving an orifice therein, a body secured to said sole plate, a handle secured to saidbody, a support member journalled at one end thereof upon said body and having its other end-in register with said orifice for projection therethrough to its supporting position, a roller element pivotally suspended upon; the body structure and adapted to serve as a fulcrum for said support member, said roller engaging the support member intermediate its ends, a spring element under compression connected to and interposed between a fixed part of the body structure and the upper surface of the support member to bias said support member against the fulcrum-roller, said roller element adapted for swinging movement to position the fulcrum-roller to either one side or the other side of the normal engaging point between said spring element and the support member, and manual means for shifting the fulcrumroller from one of its positions to the other, whereby in one position of the fulcrum-roller the support member under certain conditions may be moved to project its supporting end through said orifice to lift the iron to its support position and also whereby the support member is retracted within the body structure when the fulcrumroller is moved to its other position relative to said normal engaging point between the spring element and said support member.

6. An electric iron comprising a sole plate having an orifice therein, a body secured to said sole plate, a handle secured to said body, a support member journalled at one end thereof upon said body and having its other end in register with said orifice for projection therethrough to its supporting position, a movable fulcrum suspended upon the body structure and slidably engaging the support member on its undersurface intermediate its ends, a spring element under compression connected to and interposed between a fixed part of the body structure and the upper surface of the support member to bias said support member against the fulcrum, said fulcrum adapted for movement to position the same to either one side or the other side of the normal engaging point between said spring element and 6 the support member, manual means for shifting the fulcrum from one of its positions to the other, whereby in one position of the fulcrum the support member under certain conditions may be moved to project its supporting end through said orifice to lift the iron to its support position and also whereby the support member is retracted within the body structure when the fulcrum is moved to its other position relative to said normal engaging point between the spring element and said support member, and a thermostatic latch thermally-responsive to the sole plate and serving as a means for controlling the operation of the support member according to predetermined temperature degrees of said sole plate, said latch being so mounted and proportioned as. to assume a position to engage and form a stop for the support member to retain said member in its manually retracted position when said sole plate is at a relatively low temperature, and also where said latch during approximate ironing temperature of the sole plate will assume a position in register with an orifice in said support member to permit passage therethrough and thereby free movement of said member to its support position.

NATHANIEL B. WALES.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 2,224,896 Burian Dec. 1'7, 1940 2,470,532 Thomas May 18, 1949 FOREIGN PATENTS Number Country Date 392,454 Germany Mar. 20, 1923

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2224896 *Nov 3, 1939Dec 17, 1940Marie FuhringerSadiron lifting means
US2470532 *Aug 14, 1943May 17, 1949Thomas Albert GElectric iron with thermokinetic switch
DE392454C *Mar 20, 1923Mar 21, 1924Josef GraulichElektrisches Buegeleisen
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2710470 *Jan 4, 1951Jun 14, 1955Proctor Electric CoFlatiron
US2712703 *Jan 4, 1951Jul 12, 1955Proctor Electric CoFlatiron
US2713223 *Jun 29, 1951Jul 19, 1955Hoover CoSelf-lifting sad iron
US2713224 *Jun 29, 1951Jul 19, 1955Hoover CoSelf-lifting sad iron
US2718076 *Jan 2, 1952Sep 20, 1955Hoover CoSelf-lifting sad iron
US2727321 *Dec 18, 1952Dec 20, 1955Hoover CoSteam iron with collapsible support
US2770059 *Aug 5, 1953Nov 13, 1956Hoover CoSelf-lifting sadirons
US6105285 *Feb 16, 1999Aug 22, 2000The Nickelworks, Inc.Scorch preventing electric flatiron
US6260295Aug 16, 2000Jul 17, 2001The Nickelworks, Inc.Scorch preventing electric flatiron
US6715222 *Aug 15, 2002Apr 6, 2004Gil HechtSelf-lifting electric iron
US6925738Sep 23, 2002Aug 9, 2005Ehsan AlipourSelf lifting iron
US7406783 *May 25, 2005Aug 5, 2008Ehsan AlipourSelf lifting iron
US7546701May 15, 2006Jun 16, 2009Ehsan AlipourAutomatic standby electric clothes iron
US20030019134 *Sep 23, 2002Jan 30, 2003Ehsan AlipourSelf lifting iron
US20030056408 *Aug 15, 2002Mar 27, 2003Gil HechtSelf-lifting electric iron
US20050210719 *May 25, 2005Sep 29, 2005Ehsan AlipourSelf lifting iron
US20060254097 *May 15, 2006Nov 16, 2006Ehsan AlipourAutomatic standby electric clothes iron
CN100412257CAug 7, 2002Aug 20, 2008伊斯卡有限公司;吉尔赫克特Self-lifting electric iron
Classifications
U.S. Classification38/79
International ClassificationD06F75/40, D06F75/00
Cooperative ClassificationD06F75/40
European ClassificationD06F75/40