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Publication numberUS2597249 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 20, 1952
Filing dateAug 24, 1945
Priority dateAug 24, 1945
Publication numberUS 2597249 A, US 2597249A, US-A-2597249, US2597249 A, US2597249A
InventorsPaul Kollsman
Original AssigneePaul Kollsman
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Thermodynamic engine
US 2597249 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

3 Sheets-Sheet l P. KOLLSMAN THERMODYNAMIC ENGINE INVENTOR. 2404 #0445414, aw

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P. KOLLSMAN THERMODYNAMIC ENGINE May 20, 1952 Filed April 24, 1945 Patented May 20, 1952 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE THERMODYNAMIC ENGINE Paul Kollsman, New York, N. Y.

Application August 24, 1945, Serial No. 612,390

15 Claims.

the. gas is compressed at the periphery by the action of centrifugal force on the radial gas columns, with the application of heat energy to the gas at the periphery and along the return radial leg, the gas in its return toward the axis applying rotational energy to the engine.

Other objects and features of the invention will be readily apparent to those skilled in the art from the specification and appended drawings illustrating certain preferred embodiments in which:

Figure l is a plan View of the engine according to the present invention.

Figure 2 is a view partly in vertical section and partly in elevation, the section being taken on the line IIII, Figure 1.

Figure 3 is a partial transverse sectional view along the lines IIIIII of Figure 1.

Figure 4 is a vertical sectional view through a modified form of engine according to the invention. Figure 5 is a reduced transverse sectional view on the line V--V of Figure 4.

In the form of the invention shown in Figures 1, 2, and 3 there is provided an outer casing I, within which is disposed a rotatable shaft 2 in a bearing 3. Upon the shaft 2 is mounted a rotor portion indicated generally by the numeral 5 and formed of sections 6, I, and 8, separated by insulating spaces 9 and II, the lower portion of the spaces 9 and II being filled by solid insulation' I2 and I3 to prevent gas flow through the spaces. Exterior of the rotor 5 is mounted a rotary casing I4, carried therewith and between rotor 5 and the casing I4 are mounted a plurality of fins dividing the space between the rotor 5 and casing I4 into the plurality of individual generally U-shaped chambers or passageways. These fins are indicated generally by the reference numeral I5 and comprise radial leg I6, a bight l1, and a radial leg I8. From the leg I8, the fins continue to form axial legs I9 and 2| to continue the individual gas chambers. Within the rotor section there is provided an axial cylindrical passage 22.

Within the casing I is rigidly mounted a stationary member 23 on which, through bearing 24, is mounted a rotatable member 25 connected to the casing I4 to complete the support for the rotary parts, it being understood that the fins I5 bind the rotor 5, casing I4, rotatable member 25, and shaft 2 together into a rigid unit rotatable in bearings 3 and 24.

The stationary member 23 carries a stationary gas director 26, having substantially parallel annular walls and an axial opening 21 communicating with passage 22. Adjacent the periphery of the director 28 there are provided a plurality of directional vanes 28, shown more particularly in Figure 3 which incline in the direction of rotation of the rotor 5 to deliver the gas to the chambers formed between the fins I5 in a tangential direction.

In the outer casing I, at the left hand side of the machine, as shown in Figure 2, is disposed a cooler 28 shown as a means for spraying cooling water upon the surface of the rotary casing I4. It will be noted that the walls of easing I4 are relatively thin for efiicient heat transfer and this casing is preferably of a material of high heat conductivity. The water sprayed from the cooler 29 is collected within the casing and discharged through the outlet 3|.

Supported in the outer casing I is a partial inner casing 32 forming a chamber about the outer and right hand surfaces of the casing I4 and within this chamber there is disposed a heater 33, shown as a plurality of heating jets contacting the surface of the casing I4. The heating medium is discharged throughrthe outlet 3 Also within the casing I there is disposed a second cooler 35, shown as spraying cooling water upon the surface of the rotary casing adjacent to fin legs I8, the water from the cooler 35 being discharged through the outlet 38.

To prevent loss of the gas within the engine, there are provided rotary seals 31 and 38. In the operation of the engine the gas chambers or passages are filled with a gas which passes through a temperature-pressure cycle. While any gas is susceptible of use in the engine, it is preferred to use one of the heavier gases and to introduce it into the engine under pressure so that a greater mechanical energy can be transmitted by an engine of given size.

In the operation of the engine rotation is initiated by any desired exterior means and thereafter with the application of the cooling from the coolers 29 and 35 and of heat by the heater 33 the engine will continue to rotate from the gas energy to deliver power at the shaft 2.

With the rotation of the rotor 5 there is a continuous circulation of gas within the engine produced by the diiference in density between the radial legs of the chambers formed between the fins I5. The chamber leg between the fin legs I 6, although shorter than the chamber leg between fin. legs I8, will have gas therein at a greater mass than in the heated chamber leg due to the difierence in temperature of the gas within the legs. As the greater mass will tend to flow toward the periphery of the engine under the action of centrifugal force, a continuous circulation of gas through the chambers is effected.

The gas in the bight of the chambers between fin I! will be at maximum pressure dueto the centrifugal force acting thereon from the gas columns in the radial chamber legs. The gas in passage 22 will be at the lowest pressure and temperature.

The gas in the chamber or passage 22 passes through the opening 2! into director 25 and in passing through the vanes 28 will be delivered in a tangential direction to the individual chambers between the fin legs i6. The vanes 28 are proportioned so that under normal load the gas delivered from the collector will have substantially the same velocity as the interior ends of the fin legs l6.

As the gas passes through the chamber leg between fin I9 toward the periphery it will be progressively compressed and the cooler 29 will extract the heat of compression from the gas so that it will reach the chamber bight under pressure but at substantially cooling water temperature. In the bight of the chamber and along the leg between fins 8 the gas is heated from the heater 33 to greatly increase its energy. As the gas passes through the chamber leg between fins I6 toward the periphery, its rotational energy is increased since it is moving to a greater radius of rotation and will rotate with a higher linear velocity. As the gas returns towards the axis through the chamber leg between fins l8, it moves to a progressively decreasing radius of rotation so that it will return its energy of rotation to the rotor 5. Since the chamber leg between the fins |8 is considerably longer than the chamber leg between the fins IS, a greater rotational energy is returned to the rotor as the as passes toward theaxis than was utilized in the movement of the gas toward the periphery of the engine. The diiference, excluding frictional losses, is the energy delivered by the engine.

From the radial chambers between the fins l8 the gas enters the axially extending chambers between fins I9 and is cooled by the cooler 35 so that it returns to the axial passage 22 at substantial cooling water temperature.

In the modification of the invention shown in Figures 4 and 5 provision is made for an outer follower casing to reduce air frictional resistance to the rotation of the engine rotor and interior application of heating and cooling is provided for.

There is shown a rotor 4| supported in standards 42 by bearings 43 and 44; in bearing 43 by an integral hub 45 and in bearing 44 through a rotary member 46 connected to the side of the rotor 4|. Within the standard 42 is mounted stationary hub 41 carrying the stationary director 48 having directional vanes 49, the director 48 corresponding to the director 46 of Figure. 2.

The rotor 4| is again formed in two sections 49 and 5| and there are provided the individual rotary gas chambers with radial legs 52 and 53 and connecting axially extending peripheral bights 54. The exterior 55 of the rotor has been shown integral for the sake of simplicity but it is understood that the mechanical structure may be assembled in any desired Way, as by soldering or welding, with the chamber passages formed of fins, as in the preferred form of the invention, connecting the interior and the outer casing of the rotor. Between rotor sections 49' and 5| there is an insulating space 56 and solid insulation 51'. Rotary gas seals are provided at 11 and 18.

Through the hub 45 are passages for the transfer of a heating medium with the inlet at 58 and the outlet at 59, these passages leading to any conventional form of stuffing box to permit their rotation. From the passages 58 and 59 there extend tubes 6| and 52 leading to annular chambers 93 and 64 with which communicate a plurality of heating passages 65 extending radially and axially with respect to the rotor section 5|. Through the stationary hub 41 extend concentric cooling water tubes 65 and 6! leading to the rotor 4| and communicating through tubes 99 and 59 with annular chambers ll and 12 with which communicate cooling water passages 13 in the rotor section 49, the cooling water entering through tube 61 to pass through chamber through cooling passage 13, to chamber 12 and thence discharging through tube 65. It will be understood that any desired stuifing box arrangement will be connected to the tubes 66 and 6'! to permit their rotation. The cooling passages 13 and heating passages 55 extend closely adjacent with the surface of the rotor sections where the heat exchange is to be effected to facilitate heat transfer. It will be understood that a large number of heating and cooling passages are provided Within the rotor sections, preferably one to each of the individual gas chambers.

About the rotor 4| there is provided a drum 14 mounted in bearings 75 and 16 and free to rotate as a follower about the rotor 4|. The follower drum 14 will rotate at substantially half the speed of the rotor 4! with a resultant theoretical reduction in the frictional loss due to air resistance to substantial one-fourth.

The gas passages include axially extending portions 19 adjacent to theaxis of the rotor 4| leading from chamber legs. 53, to director- 48. Cooling of the gas is effected along the chamber leg 52 and heating of the gas is efiected over the major portion of the chamber, leg 54 and the radical chamber leg 53. Cooling is also effected in. the axially extending chambers 19.

The operation of the engine shown in Figures 4 and 5 is similar. with that described in connection with the description of the preferred embodiment of the invention. The engine is initially rotated by exterior means and with the application of cooling through passages'13 and heating through passages 55, the engine will. continue its rotation to deliver power.

Again it ispreferred to use a heavy gas under pressure to secure the maximum power output for the size of the machine and the gas circulation is effected through difference in density of the gas in chamber legs 52 and 53. The chamber leg 53 is again longer than leg 52. and the rotational energy of the axially moving gasv is returned to the machine to deliver energyat. the

i shaft. The gas before entering the chamber legs 52 is given a tangential velocity by the vanes 49.

While the legs of the gas passages have been referred to herein and in the appended claims as being radial it will be understood that they may have any direction from the axis toward the periphery which has a radial component.

While certain preferred embodiments of the invention have been specifically disclosed, it is understood that the invention is not limited thereto, as many variations will be readily apparent to those skilled in the art and the invention is to be given its broadest possible interpretation within the terms of the following claims.

What is claimed is:

1-. A thermodynamic machine comprising, a rotor body having a plurality of peripherally spaced U-shaped passages therein, each passage comprising a first compression portion extending radially outward from the axis of the rotor and constituting one leg of the U, a second portion extending substantially parallel with the rotor axis and constituting the bight of the U, and a third expansion portion extending substantially radially inward from the second portion toward the axis and constituting the other leg of the U, said one leg of the U being shorter than the other leg of the U, the end of the shorter leg constituting an intake, and the end of the longer leg constituting an outlet located closer to the axis than the intake; means for supporting the rotor for rotation about its axis, including means providing a stationary passage from the outlet to the intake; means associated with the rotor for supplying heat to the rotor adjacent the second passage portion, whereby gas circulating through said passages and compressed by centrifugal force in said first passage portion is heated by transfer of heat through the body of the rotor within the area of greatest compression, the heated gas expanding in its flow through the said third passage portion and transmitting rotative energy to the rotor.

2. A thermodynamic machine as set forth in claim 1 in which the rotor body comprises two body portions, one body portion including said first leg and a portion of the bight of the U-passage, the other body portion including the remainder of thebight and the other leg of the U-passage, said first body portion being separated from said second body portion by a zone of reduced heat conductivity to retard the transfer of heat from one body portion to the other.

3. A thermodynamic machine comprising, a rotor body having a plurality of peripherally spaced U-shaped passages therein, each passage comprising a first compression portion extending radially outward from the axis of the rotor and constituting one leg of the U, a second portion extending substantially parallel with the rotor axis and constituting the bight of the U, and a third expansion portion extending substantially radially inward from the second portion toward the axis and constituting the other leg of the U, said one leg of the U being shorter than the other leg of the U, the end of the shorter leg constituting an intake, and the end of the longer leg constituting an outlet located closer to the axis than the intake; means for supporting the rotor for rotation about its axis, including means providing a stationary passage from the outlet to the 6 the second passage portion, whereby gas circulating through said passages and compressed by centrifugal force in said first passage portion is cooled during compression and then heated by transfer of heat through the body of the rotor within the area of greatest compression, the heated gas expanding in its flow through the said third passage portion and transmitting rotative energy to the rotor.

4. A thermodynamic machine comprising, a rotor body having a plurality of peripherally spaced U-shaped individual passages therein,-

each passage comprising a first compression portion extending radially outward from the axis of the rotor and constituting one leg of the U, a second portion extending substantially parallel with the rotor axis and constituting the bight of the U, and a third expansion portion extending substantially radially inward from the second portion toward the axis and constituting the other leg of the U, said passages lying immediately below the outer surface of the rotor for ready transfer of heat through the outer surface of the rotor, said one leg of the U being shorter than the other leg of the U, the end of the shorter leg constituting an intake and the end of the longer leg constituting an outlet located closer to the axis than the intake; means for supporting the rotor for rotation about its axis including means providing a stationary return passage from the outlet to the intake; means associated with the rotor for supplying heat to the surface of the rotor at the second passage portion, whereby gas circulating through said passages and compressed by oentrifugal force is heated by transfer of heat through the rotor surface within the area of greatest compression, the heated gas expanding in its fiow through the third passage portion, giving up its rotative energy to the rotor to drive it.

5. A thermodynamic machine as set forth in claim 4 in which the rotor body comprises two body portions, one body portion including the said .first leg and a portion of the bight of the U- passage, the other body portion including the remainder of the bight and the other leg of the U- passage, said first body portion being separated from said second body portion by a zone of reduced heat conductivity to retard the transfer of heat from one body portion to the other.

6. A thermodynamic machine comprising, a rotor body having a plurality of peripherally spaced U-shaped individual passages therein, each passage comprising a first compression portion extending radially outward from the axis of the rotor and constituting one leg of the U, a second portion extending substantially parallel with the rotor axis and constituting the bight of the U, and a third expansion portion extending substantially radially inward from the second portion toward the axis and constituting the other leg of thev U, said passages lying immediately below the outer surface of the rotor for ready transfer of heat through the outer surface of the rotor, said one leg of the U being end of the longer leg constituting an outlet 10- 1 cated closer to the axis than the intake; means for supporting the rotor for rotation about its axis including means providing a stationary return passage from the outlet to the intake; means associated with the rotor for supplying heat to the surface of the rotor at the second and at the third passage portion, whereby gas circulating through said passages and compressedzibyscentrifugal forceis heated byrtransfe-r ofheat through; the: rotor surface: within; the area of greatest compression. and during expansion; the heated gas. in its flow through the third. passage. portion giving. up its rotative energy to. the rotor. to "drive i it.

'7. Aatherm'odynamic' machine comprising; a rotor. body: having a plurality of peripherallyspaced U-shaped individual passages therein, eaclppassage comprising a first: compression portion. extending; radially outward from theaxis otthexrotor and constituting one leg of the U; a. second. portion extending substantially, parallel withtherotor axis and*constituting .-the bightof'the U and. a'.third' expansion portion extending-substantially'radially inwardfrom-thesecond portion: toward: the. axis and constituting; the other" leg. of the; U; .said passages lying. immedlately below the outer'surface of the rotor for. ready transfer of heat through the outer: surface of the;rotor;..said one. leg of ;the U beingshorter thanthe' other legof the .Ul, .the'end of the shorter leg constituting. an intake and the end. of the longer. leg. constituting. an outlet located closer to the axis. than thezintake; means for'supporting the rotor: for rotation about its axis including means providinga stationary returnpassage from the outlet totheintake; cooling means as.-- sociated with the rotor for: withdrawing, heat fromthe surfaceof. the rotor adjacent said first compressionv portion; heating. means. associated with the rotor for supplying. heat to the rotor surface. adjacent: said second. passage portion, whereby gas. cimulating-v through said passages and compressed by centrifugalforce insaid first passage portion is: cooled. during compression through. the.v rotor. surface. and). then heated by transfer of heat through the rotor. surface, the heated gas expanding in: its. flow through the third passage portion giving. up its rotative energytoi the: rotor to drive it.

8; A thermodynamicv machine as; set. forth; in claim 7 in which" the rotor: bodyrcomprises two body portions, one: body portion including the said first leg and a portion. of the bight. of. the U-passage, the .otherxbodyportion including, the remainder of the bight and the other leg of: the U-passage; said. first; body portion being separated from said" second body portion; by: a zone of reduced heat: conductivity to:retard.the transfer-of heat from one body'portion to the'other.

9. A thermodynamic machine comprising; a rotor: body having a plurality of peripherally spaced U-shaped. individual. passages therein; eachpassage comprising a first compression porrtion extending radially outward from the axis of the rotor and constituting one leg of' the U, a second portion extending substantially parallel with the rotor axis and constituting the bight of the- U, and a third expansion portion extending substantially radially from the second portion ill constituting an outlet located closer to the axis than theint'ake; means for supporting therotor forrotation about its axis including means providing a stationaryreturn passage'from the outlet:to theintake; cooling means associated with the rotonfor withdrawingheatfrom the surface or the: rotor adjacent said. first compression 1 portion; heating means associatedzwith. the rotor.

for supplying heat-to the rotor surface. adjacent said second. passage portion and'said third-passage portion. whereby gascirculating. through said passages and compressed by centrifugal force in said first passage portioniscooled dur-- ingcompression through the rotor surface and then heated. by transfer of heat through the rotor surface, the heated gas expanding, in its flow through the third passage portion giving up its rotative energy to:the rotor to drive it.

16. A'thermodynamicmachine as set forth in claim 9 inwhich the rotor body comprises two body, portions, one. body portion includingv the said first leg and a portionof the bight of the U-passage, the other bodyportionincluding the remainder. of the. bight. and the outer leg of. the U-passage, said first body portion. being. separated from said second body. portion by a. zone of reduced heat conductivity to. retard the transfer of heat from one body portion, to the other.

11. A thermodynamic machine comprising, a rotor body having a plurality of peripherally spaced U-shaped individual passages. therein, each passage comprising afirst compressionportion extending radially outward from the axis of the rotor and. constituting one leg, of the U, a'second portion extending substantially parallel with. the rotor axis and constitutingthebight of the U, and a third expansion portion extending substantially radially inward from the. second portion toward the axis and constitutingv the other leg of the. U, said passages lying immediately below the outer surfaceof the. rotor for ready. transfer of heat through the outersurface. of the rotor, said one leg ofthe U being shorter. thanthe other leg of the U, the end of the shorter. leg constituting an intakeand. the end of the longerleg constituting an outlet. located closer to the axis than. the intake; means for. supporting the rotorv for rotation about its axis including means providing, a. stationary return passage from the outlet to the intake, and means for directing thev gas into the intake with. a. tangential component ofv movement; a stationary shell surrounding the rotor adjacent said second passage portion including an inletd'uct and an outlet duct for a heat transferring fluidflowing through the spacebetween. saidshelland said rotor, said fluid. being in heat transferring relation with the outer. surface of the rotor,.the. transfer of heat. to the. rotor being, promotedv by rotation of, the rotor. relatively to. theshell. in addition to the. flow of heating fluid through saidshell fromtheinletduct. to the outlet duct.

12, A thermodynamic machine comprising, a rotor body having. a plurality of peripherally spaced U-shaped individual passages therein, each passage comprising a first compressionportion extending radially outwardfrom. the axis'of the rotor and constituting. one leg of. the. U, a second. portion extending substantially parallel withtherotor axis andconstituting the bight. of the U, and athird expansion portion extending substantially radially inward from the second portion-toward the. axis and constitutingthe other leg of the U, said passageslying; immediately below the outer surface of'therotor for ready transfer of heat through the outer. surface of the rotor, said one leg of the U beingshorter than the other leg of the U, the endof the shorter leg constituting anintakeandthe end of the longer'leg constituting an outletlocated' closer to the axis than the intake; means for. supportingthe rotor for rotation aboutits axis including means providing a stationary return passage from the outlet to the intake, and means for directing the gas into the intake with a tangential component of movement; a stationary shell surrounding the rotor adjacent said second passage portion and said third passage portion including an inlet duct and an outlet duct for a heating fiuid flowing through the space between said shell and said rotor, said fluid being in heat transferring relation with the outer surface of the rotor to heat compressed gas in said second passage portion and in said third passage portion during expansion of the gas, the transfer of heat to the rotor being promoted by rotation of the rotor relatively to the shell in addition to the flow of heating fluid through said shell from the inlet duct to the outlet duct.

13. A thermodynamic machine comprising, a rotor body having a plurality of peripherally spaced U-shaped individual passages therein, each passage comprising a first compression portion extending radially outward from the axis of the rotor and constituting one leg of the U, a second portion extending substantially parallel with the rotor axis and constituting the bight of the U, and a third expansion portion extending substantially radially inward from the second portion toward the axis and constituting the other leg of the U, said passages lying immediately below the outer surface of the rotor for ready transfer of heat through the outer surface of the rotor, said one leg of the U being shorter than the other leg of the U, the end of the shorter leg constituting an intake and the end of the longer leg constituting an outlet located closer to the axis than the intake; means for supporting the rotor for rotation about its axis including means providing a stationary return passage from the outlet to the intake, and means for directing the gas into the intake with a tangential component of movement; a stationary shell enclosing the rotor, said shell providing a first outer chamber surrounding said rotor adjacent said first passage portion, said chamber including an inlet duct and an outlet duct for a cooling fluid flowing through said first chamber about said rotor, said shell further providing a second outer chamber surrounding said rotor adjacent said second portion and said third passage portion, said last named chamber including an inlet duct and an outlet duct for heating fluid flowing through said second chamber about said rotor, said fluids being in heat transferring relation with the outer surface of the rotor transfer of heat from and to said rotor being promoted by rotation of the rotor relatively to said chambers in addition to the flow of fluids through said chambers from the respective inlet ducts to the outlet ducts.

14. A thermodynamic machine as set forth in claim 13 in which the rotor body comprises two body portions, one body portion including the said first leg and a portion of the bight of the U-passage, the other body portion including the remainder of the bight and the other leg of the U-passage, said first body portion being separated from said second body portion by a Zone of reduced heat conductivity to retard the transfer of heat from one body portion to the other.

15. A thermodynamic machine comprising, a rotor body having a plurality of peripherally spaced U-shaped passages therein, each passage comprising a first compression portion extending radially outward from the axis of the rotor and constituting one leg of the U, a second portion extending substantially parallel with the rotor axis and constituting the bight of the U, and a third expansion portion extending substantially radially inward from the second portion toward the axis and constituting the other leg of the U, said one leg of the U being shorter than the other leg of the U, the end of the shorter leg constituting an intake, and the end of the longer leg constituting an outlet located closer to the axis than the intake; means for supporting the rotor for rotation about its axis, including means providing a stationary passage from the outlet to the intake; cooling means associated with the rotor for withdrawing heat adjacent said first compression portion; heating means associated with the rotor for supplying heat to the rotor adjacent the second passage portion, whereby gas circulating through said passages and compressed by centrifugal force in said first passage portion is cooled during compression and then heated by transfer of heat through the body of the rotor within the area of greatest compression, the heated gas expanding in its flow through the third passage portion and transmitting rotative energy to the rotor; and an outer shell enclosing the rotor, said shell being mounted for free rotation about the rotor axis.

PAUL KOLLSMAN.

REFERENCE S CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 1,256,673 Fottinger Feb. 19, 1918 1,256,674 Fottinger Feb. 19, 1918 2,283,176 Berman May 19, 1942 2,286,940 Trumpler June 16, 1942 2,490,064 Kollsman Dec. 6, 1949

Patent Citations
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US1256674 *Jan 11, 1918Feb 19, 1918Hermann FoettingerRotary gas-engine.
US2283176 *Nov 29, 1937May 19, 1942Turbo Engineering CorpElastic fluid mechanism
US2286940 *Aug 25, 1939Jun 16, 1942Trumpler William EInternal combustion turbine
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3931713 *Dec 30, 1974Jan 13, 1976Michael EskeliTurbine with regeneration
US3986359 *May 29, 1973Oct 19, 1976Cryo Power, Inc.Thermodynamic engine system and method
US4107944 *Jan 13, 1977Aug 22, 1978Michael EskeliHeat pump with two rotors
US4130993 *Apr 11, 1977Dec 26, 1978Ectrice, Ltd.Method and apparatus for converting thermal energy to rotational energy
US4269031 *Mar 2, 1979May 26, 1981Loskot John EHeat engine
US5373698 *Jul 2, 1992Dec 20, 1994Taylor; AlanInert gas turbine engine
US7320218Feb 9, 2005Jan 22, 2008Guy SilverMethod and system for generation of power using stirling engine principles
US8051655Oct 12, 2004Nov 8, 2011Guy SilverMethod and system for electrical and mechanical power generation using stirling engine principles
US8640461Feb 19, 2010Feb 4, 2014Steven A. ThompsonHeat exchangers and tower structure for density-driven power generation
US20100108295 *Feb 13, 2008May 6, 2010Heleos Technology GmbhProcess And Apparatus For Transferring Heat From A First Medium to a Second Medium
CN101044296BOct 7, 2005Jun 23, 2010盖伊西尔弗;吴俊龙Method and system for electrical and mechanical power generation using stirling engine principles
WO2006044323A2 *Oct 7, 2005Apr 27, 2006Guy SilverMethod and system for electrical and mechanical power generation using stirling engine principles
Classifications
U.S. Classification60/682, 60/804, 60/650, 60/39.38
International ClassificationF02C1/10, F02C1/00
Cooperative ClassificationF02C1/105
European ClassificationF02C1/10C