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Publication numberUS2597745 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 20, 1952
Filing dateSep 29, 1948
Priority dateSep 29, 1948
Publication numberUS 2597745 A, US 2597745A, US-A-2597745, US2597745 A, US2597745A
InventorsElla P Morrison
Original AssigneeSunroc Refrigeration Company
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Refrigerator and stove
US 2597745 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

s. o. MORRISON 2,597,745

REFRIGERATOR AND" STOVE May 20, 1952 Filed Sept. 29, 1948 3 Sheets-Sheet l INVENTOR 6am ueZMy zbmv a a vw ATTORNEY5 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 s o. MORRISON REFRIGERATOR AND STOVE May 20, 1952 Filed Sept. 29, 1948 INVENTOR fiamuezajjciy zlrow 20, 1952 s. o. MORRISON ,5 7,74

REFRIGERATORYAND STOVE Y Filed Sept. 29, 1948 5 Sheets-SheetB Z N nnnw HR INVENTOR I wnaezaw 07 ATTORNEYS z 6 n. I Q M w W 15. W m/ 1. w

Patented May 20, 1952 U NI TED STATES PAT ENT OFFICE REFRIGERATOR AND STOVE SaniuelO. Morrison, Media, Pa Ella P. Morrison; e'xecutrix-of said samuel orMorris'on, deceased,

assignor to Sunroc Refrigeration Company, Dover, DeL, a. corporation of Delaware 9 Claims.

The" present invention relates to refrigerators and stoves;

M A purpose of'the'invention' is' to provide a stove for'warming and heating which is operated from the heat produced by a mechanical refrigeration system.

A further purpose is to permit the warming of milk, coffee and other foods as a by-product advantage from the operation of a mechanical refrigeration system, particularly on vehicles suchas railway trains and aeroplanes.

A further purpose is to provide refrigeration andstove compartments side by side in the same cabinet, but suitably insulated from one another, and operating from the same mechanical refrigeration system.

A further purpose is to operate a stove as the condenser of a mechanical refrigeration system.

A further purpose is to mount the compressor and/or the condenser of a mechanical refrigeration system in heat transfer relation to a stove, and preferably to'immerse the compressor and/or the condenser in a liquid bath which provides heat for the'stove.

A further purpose is to employ an auxiliary condenser which is normally ineffective, but is made effective to cool thecompressor when the compressorreaches a specified high temperature due to the operationof thestove.

A' further purpose is to employ an auxiliary electric" heater for the stove, and desirably to equip the electricheater with an emergency cutoff to protect the compressor and its motor.

Further purposes appear in the specification and in the claims.

In the drawings I have chosen to illustrate a few onlyof the numerous embodiments in which my invention may appear, choosing the forms shown from the standpoints of convenience in illustration, satisfactory operation and clear demonstration of the principles involved.

Figures" 1, 2 and 3 are diagrammatic fragmenta'ry" central vertical sections of different embodiments'of the invention; The'upper portions of the cabinets only a'reshown, the lower portions being omitted to simplify the illustration.

Describing'in illustration but not in limitation and referring-to the drawings:

There are many installations of water coolers and" mechanical refrigerators in places where facilities for warming food and other materials would be desirable. In some cases it would be desirabletobe able to warm'fo'od-which is stored in the refrigerator. In other cases it would be desirable to warm water which is dispensedby the 2. water cooler. In still other instances food-- or other materials which areavailable independently of therefrigerator and water cooler should be warmedor heated; for example it isoften desirable to warm a baby's bottle ona railway train oraeroplane, and such facilities are-usually not available;

In accordance with the present invention; the heat developed in the mechanical refrigeration unit or some portion thereof is made available'for use in an electric stove or hot plate for warming or cooking food or other articles; By the invention, the compressor andalso" the condenser in one embodiment are placed in heat transfer relation withthe stove, suitably in-aliquid'bath below the stove. In the meantime the refrigeration produced is employed inarefrigerator or water cooler in the usual manner.

The refrigerator compartment and stove compartmentare preferably placed sideby side at the top of a cabinet, so as tosimplify theconnec tions of the operating elements ofthe refrigeration unit,- and make both the-refrigerator and the stove readily accessibleby theuser.

In one embodiment ofthe invention an auxiliarycondenser is provided which'is normally effectively inoperative, but which is made operative when required in response to the abnormal rise in temperature 'in the compressor.

In many cases it is desirable to provide an auxiliary electric heater for the stove, soas to raise the temperature beyond the temperature reached by the compressor. The auxiliary electric heater is preferably provided with a safety thermostat cutoff to prevent'unduly heating the compressor and its motor.

Referring'to Figure 1, a cabinet 20 has conveniently located near its top awater storage and cooling compartment 26-01? a water cooler, a refrigerator compartment 22' and a stove compartment 23; desirably located side by side so that each canbe independently accessible to the user. The refrigerator and water cooler compartments are separated by a heat transfer wall 24,- which permits ready cooling of the water as well as of the refrigerator compartment by an evaporator 25located in thecompartment. The evaporator is suitably equipped with shelves 26' for holding ice cube trays if desired. The refrigerator oompartment and water compartment are surrounded by heat insulation 21, which is particularly important at 25 between the refrigerator compartment and the stove compartment. The water from'thewater cooler compartment is discharged by a pipe 30 to a dispenser 3|, which may be -a faucet or bubbler. The refrigerator compartment and water cooler compartment are covered by a suitably removable lid 82.

The refrigeration for the refrigerator compartment and water cooler are provided by a motorcompressor 33, preferably of the well known hermetic type. The motor-compressor is located in the stove compartment in heat transfer relation to the stove. This is best achieved by mounting the stove 34 directly on top of the motorcompressor as by metallic brackets 35. To assure adequate storage of heat, the motor-compressor is desirably mounted in a metallic well 36, which is properly liquid tight and contains a liquid bath up to a suitable level 31. The liquid bath may vary with the intended use. For a dry stove or hot plate the liquid may suitably be molten paraillne, mineral oil, glycerine or other high boiling liquid. For a steam table, the liquid of the bath should be water or a solution in which a substantial amount of water is present. Of course, in the case of water, it will be necessary to replenish frequently, Whereas with the high boiling liquids replenishment will not be required frequently. In order to suggest the practicability of using for a steam table, no sealing wall is placed over the liquid in Figure 1, but in Figures 2 and 3 a metallic partition 38 is placed over the top of the liquid to prevent splashing and minimize likelihood of fumes rising to the area Where food will be heated.

In the form of Figure l, a condenser 40 in the form of a coil is immersed in the liquid bath around the motor-compressor. Thus in this form the heat is removed from the compressor and from the condenser to the liquid bath and transmitted to the stove. As shown in Figure 2, however, a condenser ma be employed which is outside the liquid bath. It should be recognized that the immersion of the compressor in the liquid bath makes the liquid bath in itself effectively a condenser.

High pressure refrigerant from the compressor passes through a pipe 4| to the condenser 40 and from the condenser flows preferably through a constrictor 42, which serves as an expansion control (while an expansion valve may be employed, it is preferred to use a capillary tube) and thence to the evaporator 25, from which it returns to the low pressure side of the compressor by a pipe 43.

The refrigeration control of the motor-compressor is accomplished in the usual manner. A thermostat 44, suitably of the expansible fluid type, includes a bulb 45 in close association with the evaporator, a capillary tube 46 connecting to the bulb and a bellows 41 connecting to the tube. On expansion of the fluid the bellows closes a switch 48 in the circuit 50 of the compressormotor. A manual switch 5| can be operated to disconnect the mechanism, as for defrosting.

The stove is intended to derive its main source of heat from the compressor and the condenser, and by this means can be safely heated to a temperature of about 175 F. without danger of burning out the motor, even over a long period of time. For reasonable periods the motor will, however, stand considerably higher temperatures. Accordingly the stove is provided with an auxiliary electric heating element 52 connected in circuit by closing a manual switch 53 in its electric circuit 54. In series with the auxiliary electric heating element is a normally closed thermostat switch 55. The switch 55 is operated under emergency conditions by a thermostat suitably of the expanding fluid type, including a bulb 50, capillary connecting tube 51 and bellows 58. When the temperature of the liquid bath and therefore of the motor and compressor reaches an abnormally high value, the thermostatic switch 55 will open, thus disconnecting the auxiliary heater 52.

In operation the water cooler and refrigerator will be operated in the normal manner, while the heat developed by cooling will then be made available in the stove. Since the liquid bath will have considerable heat capacity, heat will be retained by the stove whether or not the compressor and motor are operating at the moment. If, however, the user desires to obtain a higher temperature this can be achieved by turning on the auxiliary heater. The auxiliary heater will, however, be limited to a reasonably short period of operation by the thermostatic switch, which will cut it off before the temperature of the motor-compressor can reach a dangerously high value. Thus for example, the auxiliary heater might be used to boil Water, but the thermostatic switch may be set to cut the auxiliary heater off when the temperature of the liquid bath reached 220 F.

Figure 2 shows a variation in the form of Figure 1. In this form the stove is placed in the bottom of a warming oven 60, provided with a removable lid 61.

Instead of locating the condenser in the liquid bath, reliance for normal condenser action is placed entirely on the liquid bath acting on the motorccmpressor and the short section of the pipe 4! immersed in the bath. A condenser 40 is located outside the bath, and is normally maintained effectively inoperative because no source of cooling air or medium is provided. When, however, the motor compressor is in danger from an abnormally high temperature, protection is provided by an air circulating fan 82 having a motor 63 driven by an electric circuit 64 closed by a thermostatic switch 65 to blow a stream of air under the condenser 40. The thermostatic switch is desirably controlled by a thermostat of the expanding liquid type, having a bulb 66 immersed in the bath and connected by a capillary tube 61 with a bellows 68, which on expansion closes the switch.

In operation the form of Figure 2 will be essentially the same as that of Figure 1 except that the protection of the motor-compressor against abnormally high temperatures will be provided by cooling the refrigerant through the auxiliary condensor rather than by disconnecting the auxiliary heater.

Figure 3 is a variation of form of Figure l, in which the condenser 40 is immersed in the liquid bath 36 in heat transfer relation with the stove. and the motor-compressor 33 is located outside of the liquid bath and not in heat transfer relation with the stove. The protection for the motor-compressor is in this case provided by a thermostat operating responsive to the temperature of the liquid bath and therefore of the condenser. The form of Figure 3 operates similarly to the form of Figure 1, but has the advantage in some cases that the motor-compressor need not be of the hermetic type.

The device of the invention is particularly applicable to use on vehicles and in other installations where casual warming or cooking of food is required and the heat incidentally made available by the water cooler or refrigerator can be used.

In view of my invention and disclosure variations and modifications to meet individual whim or particular need will doubtless become evident to others skilled in the art, to obtain all or part of the benefits of my invention without copying the structure shown, and I, therefore, claim all such insofar as they fall Within the reasonable spirit and scope of my claims.

Having thus described my invention what I claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent is:

1. In a refrigerator and stove, a refrigerator compartment, a stove, a liquid bath in heat transfer relation with the stove and a mechani cal refrigeration system having a compressor in heat transfer relation to the liquid bath and having an evaporator in heat transfer relation with the refrigerator compartment.

2. In a refrigerator and stove, a refrigerator compartment, a stove, a liquid bath in heat transfer relation with the stove and a mechanical refrigeration system having a condenser in heat transfer relation to the liquid bath, and having an evaporator in heat transfer relation with the refrigerator compartment.

3. In a refrigerator and stove, a refrigerator compartment, a stove, a liquid bath in heat transfer relation with the stove and a mechanical refrigerator system having a compressor and condenser in heat transfer relation to the liquid bath and having an evaporator in heat transfer relation with the refrigerator compartment.

4. In a refrigerator and stove, a refrigerator compartment, a stove, a mechanical refrigeration system having a compressor in heat transfer relation to the stove, having a condenser free from heattransfer relation with the stove, having a device for cooling the condenser which is operated intermittently, and having an evaporator in heat transfer relation with the refrigerator compartment, and thermostatic mechanism responsive to the temperature of the compressor for operating the device for cooling the condenser when the compressor becomes excessively hot.

5. In a refrigerator and stove, a cabinet having a refrigerator compartment and a stove compartment side by side at the top, insulation between the refrigerator compartment and the stove compartment, a stove in the stove compartment, a liquid bath below the stove and in heat transfer relation with it and a mechanical refrigeration system having a compressor immersed in the liquid bath and having an evaporator in heat transfer relation with the refrigerator compartment.

6. In a refrigerator and stove, a cabinet having a refrigerator compartment and a stove compartment side by side at the top, insulation between the refrigerator compartment and the stove compartment, a stove in the stove compartment, a liquid bath below the stove and in heat transfer relation with it and a mechanical refrigeration system having a condenser immersed in the liquid bath and having an evaporator in heat transfer relation with the refrigerator compartment.

'7. In a refrigerator and stove, a cabinet having a refrigerator compartment and a stove compartment side by side at the top, insulation between the refrigerator compartment and the stove compartment, a stove in the stove compartment, a liquid bath in the stove compartment beneath the stove and a mechanical refrigeration system having a compressor and a condenser, both immersed in the liquid bath and having an evaporator in heat transfer relation with the refrigerator compartment.

8. In a refrigerator and stove, a refrigerator compartment, a stove, an auxiliary electric heater for the stove, a mechanical refrigeration system having a compressor in heat transfer relation to the stove and having an evaporator in heat transfer relation with the refrigerator compartment and a thermostatic switching device responding to the temperature of the compressor and in circuit to turn off the auxiliary electric heater when the compressor becomes excessively hot.

9. In a refrigerator and stove, a refrigerator compartment, a stove, an auxiliary electric heater for the stove, a mechanical refrigeration system having a condenser in heat transfer relation to the stove and having an evaporator in heat transfer relation with the refrigerator compartment and a thermostatic switching device responding to the temperature of the condenser and in circuit to turn off the auxiliary electric heater when the condenser becomes excessively hot.

SAMUEL O. MORRISON.

' REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 1,881,603 Hull Oct. 11, 1932 1,886,607 Van Deventer Nov. 8, 1932 2,042,812 Tull June 2, 1936 2,162,245 Comstock June 13, 1939 2,375,157 Wilkes May 1, 1945 2,467,464 Carriere "a Apr. 19, 1949 FOREIGN PATENTS Number Country Date 481,567 Great Britain Mar. 11, 1938

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1881603 *Dec 30, 1930Oct 11, 1932Frigidaire CorpRefrigerating apparatus
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US2467464 *Aug 2, 1946Apr 19, 1949Maytag CoRefrigerator with defrosting pan
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2696085 *Mar 31, 1952Dec 7, 1954V C Patterson & Associates IncHeat pump water heater
US3134242 *Jan 15, 1962May 26, 1964George A BlaseRefrigerator with thawing means
US4037649 *Apr 4, 1975Jul 26, 1977Hartka Dale RHeating and refrigeration system
US4355521 *Sep 19, 1980Oct 26, 1982Tsai Yun TingRefrigerator-oven complex
US4400950 *Jun 29, 1981Aug 30, 1983Heinrich KnabbenHeating device comprising a heat pump
US4459820 *Jul 1, 1982Jul 17, 1984Necchi Societa Per AzioniMotor-driven compressor-condenser group for cooling cycles
US4517799 *Dec 7, 1983May 21, 1985Misawa Home Co., Ltd.Heat utilizing system using internal combustion engine
US5906109 *Jul 3, 1998May 25, 1999Arthur D. Little, Inc.Heat pump water heater and storage tank assembly
US5946927 *Apr 14, 1998Sep 7, 1999Arthur D. Little, Inc.Heat pump water heater and storage tank assembly
US5966961 *Feb 19, 1997Oct 19, 1999Ziggiotto; PaoloApparatus for heating and/or refrigerating food in general
DE1174339B *Oct 26, 1960Jul 23, 1964Schiff & Stern Ges M B HMotoraggregat fuer nach dem Waermepumpen-prinzip arbeitende Kaeltemaschinen fuer Kuehlschraenke
EP0791793A2 *Feb 18, 1997Aug 27, 1997Paolo ZiggiottoApparatus for heating and/or refrigerating food in general
Classifications
U.S. Classification165/240, 392/339, 165/138, 165/918, 62/183, 62/203, 165/58, 165/61, 62/238.6, 165/104.19
International ClassificationF25D23/12, F25D31/00
Cooperative ClassificationF25D23/12, Y10S165/918, F25D31/005
European ClassificationF25D23/12