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Publication numberUS2598454 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 27, 1952
Filing dateJun 2, 1950
Priority dateJun 2, 1950
Publication numberUS 2598454 A, US 2598454A, US-A-2598454, US2598454 A, US2598454A
InventorsSmith Edward A
Original AssigneeRaymond Concrete Pile Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Drilling apparatus
US 2598454 A
Abstract  available in
Images(7)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

y 1952 E. A. SMITH 2,598,454

DRILLING APPARATUS Filed June 2, 1950 '7 Sheets-Sheet l 3O FIGJ INVENTO EDWARD A. SMITH ATTORNEYS y 1952 E. A. SMITH 2,598,454

DRILLING APPARATUS Filed June 2, 1950 7 Sheets-Sheet 2 2 ml, Mi

ATTORNE S May 27, 1952 Filed June 2, 1950 E. A. SMITH 2,598,454

DRILLING APPARATUS 7 Sheets-Sheet 3 INVENTOR. EDWARD A. FMITH ATTORN EYJ May 27, 1952 E. A, SMITH DRILLING APPARATUS Filed June 2, 1950 7 Sheets-Sheet 4 WIIIWIIHWmUHHWWUII I INVENTOR. EDWARD A. SMITH a MM+W ATTORNEYS y 1952 E. A. SMITH 2,598,454

DRILLING APPARATUS Filed June 2, 1950 7 Sheets-Sheet 5 FIG. IO

INVEN TOR. EDWARD A. SMITH ATTORNEY-3 May 27, 1952 E. A. SMITH 2,598,454

' DRILLING APPARATUS Filed June 2, 1950 7 Sheets-Sheet 6 FIG. I2

FIG. 57

Mm L? g '3 lll nl' "MI' IIP INVENTOR. EDWARD A. SMITH ATTORNEYS E. A. SMITH DRILLING APPARATUS May 27, 1952 7 Sheets-Sheet 7 Filed June 2, 1950 EDWARD A. SMiTH ATTORNEKS Patented May 27, 1952 UNITED STATES FTENT OFFICE DRILLING APPARATUS Edward A. Smith, Chatham, N. .L, assignor to Raymond Concrete Pile Company, New York, N. Y., a corporation of New Jersey Application June 2, 1950, Serial No. 165,736

5 Claims. (Cl. 25519) This invention relates to drilling apparatus and more particularly a novel arrangement of equipment adapted to be combined and used with pile drivers to convert same into means for handling and operating drills.

Pile driving equipment of a well known type comprises a rotatably mounted platform or carriage upon which there is mounted an elongated upstanding structure having guide rails for receiving a steam hammer assembly which is slidable by power hoisting means to various elevations along the guide rails. This structure is usually pivotally connected at its base to a horizontally slidable extension for the carriage and also connected to boom means controlled by suitable tackle, all operable by power means on the carriage to control the position of said upstanding structure whereby the guide rails thereof may be tilted downwardly and forwardly, rearwardly or outwardly to either side of the carriage, and also whereby, in view of the rotatable mounting of the carriage, the guide rails may be directed in various positions at substantially any inclination desired for driving piles or caissons at a corresponding inclination.

In installing various types of hollow steel piles or caissons it is customary to drive them with equipment such as above described at the desired position and angle, or verticaly down to a rock footing, and in order to insure that the lower end will remainin place and distribute its load throughout the rock, it is sometimes the practice to drill a hole into the rock concentric with the lower end of the pile or caisson shell and then fill such hole as well as the shell with concrete reinforced with a steel H-member or otherwise if desired.

Prior to my invention, so far as I am aware it has been the general practice for such drilling to employ conventional types of drilling equipment, such for example, as ordinary oil well rotary drilling apparatus, but this requires setting up special equipment to handle, rotate and control the drill. On the other hand with the pres entinvention only afew relatively simple parts and attachments are necessary to convert a pile driver into a form of apparatus suitable for per-- forming the drilling by utilizing the power means and derrick. equipment already available upon the pile driver. And since, where the equipment of this invention is to be used, a pile driver will usually already be present on the job for pile or caisson driving purposes, the expense and inconvenience of bringing to the site additional equip ment' for. drilling purposes is largely obviated,

However, it will be understood that the invention is useful for drilling as well in cases where no pile or caisson is first driven, and the invention is particularly useful in cases where the drill holes are to be made at a' variety of different inclinations.

Further and more specific objects, features and advantages of the invention hereof will appear from the detailed description given below, taken in connection with the accompanying drawings which form a part of this specification and illustrate by way of example a preferred embodiment of the invention.

In the drawings: 1

Fig. 1 is a somewhat schematic elevational view showing a pile driver which has been converted and combined with drilling apparatus in'accordance with the invention. Fig. 2 is a view of the lower half of the guide rails and supporting structure thereof of the pile driver and showing the apparatus when the guide rails are so positioned for drilling a hole at an inclination to one side of the pile driver platform or carriage. Fig. 3 is a sectional view taken substantially along line 3-3 of Fig. 1. Fig. 4 is a vertical sectional view taken substantially along line 44 of Fig. 3. Fig. 5 is a side elevational view of a portion of the equipment of Fig. 3, certain of the parts being broken away. Figs. 6 and 7 are views taken substantially along lines B-% and 'l-J of Fig. 5 respectively. Fig. 8 is a horizontal sectional view taken substantially along line 8-8 of Fig. 5. Fig. 9 is a sectional view taken substantially along line -3--9 of Fig. 5. Fig. 10 is a view similar to Fig. 3, but showing the parts oscillated to a different position. Fig. 1-1 is a vertical sec-' tional view of the. upper portion of the drill stem as detachably connected to the steam hammer assembly. Fig. 12 is an elevational view of the part of the equipmentshown in Fig. 1 1. Fig. 13 is a vertical sectional view of the lower end portions of the drill in operation for drilling a hole at the lower end of a hollow pile or caisson; and Fig. 14 is a sectional view taken substantially along line i l-4i of Fig. 13.

Referring now more specifically to Fig. 1, the pile driver as here shown comprises a platform or carriage l5 rotatably mounted by suitable known means I5, and carrying a boom-like means H which is adjustable by suitable tackle l 8 operable by power driven means generally indicated at I9 on the rear portion of the carriage I5. Means such as indicated at 20 is mounted on the forward end of the carriage to be slidable-inv and out under the control of the power equipment, such means 28 at its outer end being pivotally connected as at 2! to an elongated upstanding structure 22, the mid portion of which is pivotally connected as at 23 to the upper end of the boom means ll. Thus, in the usual way the structure 22 may be moved to various inclinations pointing downwardly and forwardly. or downwardly and rearwardly, depending upon the position of the slide means 20 and the inclination of the boom means [1' as pivotally connected to the structure 22 at 23. As further shown in Fig. 2 the outer end of the slidable means 28 may if desired be provided with an arcuate guiding means 24 along which the lower end of the structure 22 may be moved to tilt the said structure to inclined positions directed toward the ground at either side of the carriage.

On the structure 22 a pair of guide rails 26, 21 are mounted for slidably receiving a steam hammer assembly as at 28, the elevation of which may be adjusted along the guide rails by a cable 29 running over pulleys as at 3B and down to the power hoisting apparatus on the carriage [5.

The portions of the equipment of Figs. 1 and 2 as thus far specifically described constitute parts of a known form of pile driver, and for such details thereof as are not hereinabove specifically described, reference may be had to such well known forms of pile drivers.

An elongated hollow drill stem 32 is adapted to be positioned between the two guide rails 26, 27 and to be slidably and oscillatably retained in such position by attachments to the pile driver hereinafter described. Two or more longitudinally extending key portions as at 33, 33 are secured as by welding along the greater part of the length of the drill stem and these are adapted to be slidably received by wrench means for oscillating the drill stem as hereinafter described. such wrench means together with retaining means therefor being located at 34 adjacent the lower end of the structure 22.

Reference is now made to the lower end of the drill stem as shown in Figs. -7, and 13, 14. As best shown in the lower part of Fig. 5 and in Fig. 7 a pair of steel plates 36, 31, sharpened at their lower edges as at 38, are welded in place at right angles to each other to provide the cutting means. At the lower end of the hollow stem 32 a plate as at 39 is welded in place for closing 01? such end except for passages as at 40 formed by channel shaped members At, each of which is welded along one of the right angle corners formed by the members 36, 31 so as to provide four discharge outlets 42 communicating with the hollow interior of the stem 32 and serving to discharge water or other fluid therefrom to points adjacent the cutting edges 38.

In Fig. 13 the lower portions of the drill are shown in a position extending down through a hollow pile or caisson shell 43 which has been previously driven to rock footing as at 34. It will be understood that after this shell is put in place the drill as handled by the pile driver equipment is slipped down through the shell into drilling position. But first an annular guide means generally indicated at 50 is preferably placed around the drill stem just above the cutting members 36, 31, this guide means being for the purpose of centering the drill with respect to the caisson or pile shell while at the same time allowing the drill to gradually slide down therethrough as the drilling proceeds. As shown in Fig. 14 the guide means 50 may comprise simply a pair of semi-cylindrical members having flanges bolted together as at 5| and. having such additional longitudinally extending spacer flanges at 52 as may be desirable to space the drill assembly uniformly from the inside walls of the pile or caisson shell.

The upper end of the drill stem 32 as shown in Fig. 11 is preferably covered by a driving head or cap 55 preferably sealed in place and adapted to be received within the lower socketed end of a hammer follower piece 55 which may be of a suitable known construction, such as heretofore used as a follower for steam hammers in the driving of piles. The steam hammer assembly 28 as shown in Fig. 11 may be of a suitable conventional type having a ram 51 adapted to strike a wooden block as at 53 retained on top of the follower 53.

The upper end of the drill stem is preferably formed with the transversely extending tubular piece 59 welded and sealed in place to provide an aperture for receiving a cable sling or loop Gil for loosely and detachably securing the drill stem to the hammer. That is, the lower portion of the hammer assembly is provided with hook portions Bl such as usually used for attaching a follower and these are here used for hooking engagement with the two ends of the loop 69. The follower 58 may similarly be detachably connected to the hammer assembly by a loop or sling 62, the mid portion of which passes through apertures 63 in the follower and the ends of which also engage on hook portions 6| in the usual way of securing the pile driving follower in place with respect to the hammer.

The upper portion of the hollow drill stem 32 is provided with a hose connection 64 for introducing a supply of water or other liquid into the stem to flow down about the cutting edges of the lower end of the drill as above described. Since the drill stem in operation is merely oscillated and not rotated continuously as is the case with the usual rotatable drill, the water connection at 64 does not need to be a swiveled attachment.

Referring now more particularly to Figs. 35. 8 and 9, the guide and wrench means at the base of the structure 22 for holding the drill stem in position and oscillating same, will now be described.

A fabricated steel yoke means 56 has its two branches rigidly and permanently aifixed to the lower ends of the guide rails 25, 21 respectively. The guide means generally indicated at 6'! (see Figs. 3 and 8) may include a cylindrical portion 58 within which is rotatably received a portion of the wrench means hereinafter described. Cylin drical portion 68 is welded at its upper and lower ends to plates and H! (Figs. 4 and 5). Also vertical fins as at ll, 12 are welded to opposite sides of the member 68 (Fig. 8) and webs 13 are welded to member 68 and to the top and bottom plates of the guide assembly. Adapter means are provided at each side of this arrangement, permitting same to be remoyably and slidably received between the guide rails 25 and 21'. Such adapter means may comprise a pair of runners l3, 74 of I-shaped cross section, and between the flanges of which the guide rails 25, 21 are received, as will be apparent in Fig. 8. A pair of plate-like lugs as at l5, 16 (Figs. 5 and 8) are welded at vertically spaced points to each of the members '13, id, and removable pins at as ll are positioned in apertures passing down through plate 69, platelike lugs l6, l5 and plate 18. Each of the members l3, '14 also has protruding from one side thereof, a plurality of pins as at I8 which are 5 Iemovablymeceived incortfifiliflflhlhbfirtuzesrill web portions '19 which are weldedtto andF-formra par Of the uide assembly- :er. Thus. when the 15 wejlded thereto,-and the pins .13, .serveto hold a the entire guide means in a position :between ithe guide rails 26 and 21 and theguiderassembly :as a whole in such position is sli'dable 11p. and down. theguide rails zfi, 21.

'In order 'to lim-itdownwa-rdsliding o'fttheguide assembly'fi l fingermem-bersflll, '9] normally pro trude into the spaeebetween the flanges of guide rails 27;"25 respectively and restupon'websfas at 82 welded in place between suchfflanges. These fingers areeach pivotally mounted on removable pins as at. 331 which pass through a pair of webs as at.84 suitably welded to the guide assembly, the fingers B 8| being movable arcuately about the pins 83-while held between the webs 84 (see Figs; and 8).. The fingers 80, 8| are normally held in active position by removable pins as at 86. When these pins are removed andthe whole guide assembly 61 is elevated somewhat (as by using the power hoisting facilities of the pile driver), it will apparent from Fig. 5 that the fingers :80, 8! will be free to swing about their pivoting pins 83 so that their inner ends will drop down and thereafter the whole guide assembly will be free to beslid-down out from between the lower ends of the guide rails 26, '21.

The wrench assembly for arcuate'ly oscillating the drill stem may comprise four annular rings 81, 88, 89 and 99 (Fig. 4), each-of which is formed with internal notches to slidably receive the keys 33, 33'' on the drill stem'32 (see Fig. 8) and also with such further internal notches as at 9| as maybe necessary to enable the wrench means to be slid onto. the drill stem either over the lower end or over the water connections etc. at the upper end. As-shown in Fig. 4, annular rings 88 and 89 respectively are welded to the upper and lower ends of a cylindrical member 92 which is rotatably received within the cylindrical portion 68 of the guide assembly; The upper annular ring-8'! is removably secured as by bolts 93 to the annular r ring 88. The external diameter of ring 81 is larger than the diameter of the central aperture through the guide assembly 61 so that this top ring serves to retain the wrench means against sliding down through the guide means, but when the wrench means is to be removed from the guide assembly, this may be accomplished simply by removing the bolts 93 to remove the upper'ring B1 whereupon the wrench structure may be readily slid down out of the guide assembly.

The lower two annular rings 89, 90 respectively are welded to the upper and lower ends of a tubular member 95. Arm-likemeans generally indicated at 96 is of a fabricated construction welded to the rings 89, 90 and to the tubular member 95 and, protrudes out to a pair of branches also of fabricated construction and generally indicated at 9?, 99 (Fig. 9). Ropes or cables 99, I00 are secured-to the outer ends of the parts 91, 99 respectively rand upon applying tension to such cables alternately, the wrench structure, together with the drill stem, may be oscillated arcuately through about 120 as indicated by the parts shown'in dotted and full lines in Fig. 10. Cables 9-9, I99 pass under and around sheaves llll, I02

B .respeotivelmsthe themes; tor winch icreipivcmllr mountedr-asazt. :3. kM'toxtheeomershf-the-woke 'mcmberfifi. .Erorn the sheaves al 01;, 1:02, the cables extendup along-thecstructurec Rig-.11) and-over sheavesasciat l llfi andithence; down toarspoolalike .dru-mor drums iormingia usualxpart oi-therpowerdriven hoisting equipmentat t9, the dr drums being so driven-and the cables. being 'so wound thereon that tension'imay be alternately pplied. to the cables in rainy-suitable known way.

The cables .99.. 1| 00:, :as shown inFi'g. 3.v normal- 1y areguided oversheayesasvat N6, llll'mounted at. the'sides of. the branches-of the yoke 66., but as will be clear from Fig. 10. when the wrench means i moved to (its extreme position in. either direction. the cables will leave-these sheaves and then. to control their positlonscyelet-'likemembers as at I08. I09 may be provided, these members being pivotally mounted on the same axis as the sheaves I06, I01 and being .free to swing within limits as determined by stop members 0 which are welded to the brackets III by which the eyelet-like members are pivotally carried.

In order to convert the pile driver into apparatus for drilling, the above-described wrench assembly may first be slid over the drill stem 32. The guide assembly 61 is then slid into place about the upper portion of the wrench assembly and there held in place by bolting on the upper annular ring 81. The power driven hoisting equipment of the pile driver may then be. used by attaching a sling around the upper end of the drill stem to pull the drill stem up into an'upright position between'the guide rails 2.6, 21.. Then, after the adapter means.,inc1-uding the runners 13, T4- are in place at the lower ends of the guide rails 26., 21, the. guide assembly 51,. as containing the wrench means and drill stem, may be lifted to the: proper elevation by the power hoisting equipment of the pile driver and fitted into place between such adapter means and there retained by inserting the pins 11.

Ifxthe lower end of the drill stem is to be held 1. in alignment with a pile or. caisson shell as-hereinabove described in connection with Figs. 13 and I4, the drill. stem will have first been surrounded, by the guide. means of Fig. 14.

The upper end ofv the drill stem may now be removably attached to the hammer assembly 28 and follower piece 56 as above describedv in connection with Figs. 11 and 12, and upon applying the. water connection at 64, the drilling apparatus will be ready for operation. The pile driver hammer is: then put into operation in the. usual way, and as the drill stem is arcuately oscillated, drilling will proceed. After drilling of the hole is completed, it will be apparent that the parts. which are, used to adapt the pile driver for drillingpurposes, may all readily be removed.

to permit the pile driver to then beused again for driving piles for caissons.

With. the above described embodiment of the invention, it will be noted that the: drillv stem is held and guided at its lower end by the guide means 59 and at a point intermediate its length by the guide assembly 61,, and also the upper end of the drill stem is retained against any substantial displacement by reason of the detachable connections to the hammer assembly. Of course if necessary or desired, additional guide means may be provided for the drill stem at intermediate points along the structure 22.

While the invention has been described in detail with respect to a particular preferred example, it will be understood by those skilled in the art after understanding the invention, that various changes and further modifications may be made without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention, and it is intended, therefore, in the appended claims to cover all such changes and modifications.

'--What is claimed as new and desired to be secured by Letters Patent is:

1. Pile driving apparatus adapted for alternative use for drilling purposes, comprising in combination: a pile driver assembly of the type having guide rails; a fluid pressure operated pile driving hammer assembly slidable by the power hoisting means of the apparatus to various elevations along said guide rails, said guide rails being adjustable in position by the power hoisting means; an elongated drill stem adapted to extend along between said guide rails' and formed with longitudinal key means. said drill stem being detachably and oscillatably connected at its upper end to the hammer assembly; guide means for slidably and oscillatably receiving the drill stem and detachably secured to the lower ends of said guide rails; wrench means slidablyengaging said drill stem key means for oscillating the drill stem, said wrench means also being detachably supported on the lower ends of said guide rails; and cables connected to oscillate said wrench means upon being; alternately subjected to tension by the power means on the pile driver assembly.

2. Pile driving apparatus adapted for alternative use for drilling purposes, comprising in combination: a pile driver assembly of the type having guide rails; a fluid pressure operated pile driving hammer assembly slidable by power hoisting means of the apparatus to various elevations along said guide rails, said guide rails being adjustable in inclination by the power hoisting means; an elongated drill stem extending along said guide rails and formed with a longitudinally extending fluid passage; a connection rigidly secured at the upper end of said drill stem for bringing said passage into communication with a source of fluid supply, said drill stem being detachably connected at its upper end by a sling to the hammer assembly permitting oscillation of the drill stem; guide means for slidably and oscillatably receiving the drill stem and detachably secured to the lower ends of said guide rails; wrench means slidably engaging said drill stem adjacent said guide means for oscillating the drill stem; and cables connected to oscillate said wrench means upon being alternately subjected to tension by the power means on the pile driver assembly.

3. Pile driving apparatus adapted for alternative use ior drilling purposes, comprising in combination: a pile driver assembly of the type having guide rails; a fluid pressure operated pile driving hammer assembly slidable by power hoisting means of the apparatus to various elevations along said guide rails, said guide rails being pivotally mounted intermediate the ends thereof for adjustment to various angles to the vertical, the power hoisting means having connections to said 8 guide rails to affect such adjustments; an elongated drill stem adapted to extend along said guide rails; sling means for detachably connecting said drill stem at its upper end to the hammer assembly and permitting oscillation of the drill stem; guide means adapted to be detachably secured to the lower ends of said guide rails for slidably and osoillatably receiving the drill stem; detachable wrench means for slidably engaging said drill stem adjacent said guide means for oscillating the drill stem; and detachable connections for extending between said wrench means and the power means on the pile driver apparatus for oscillating said wrench means.

4. In combination with the hammer guide rails of fluid pressure operated pile driving hammer apparatus having power hoisting equipment: guide means detachably secured to the lower ends of said guide rails and having an aperture between said guide rails for slidably and oscillatably receiving a drill stem; a drill stem detachably and oscillatably connected at its upper end to the hammer assembly and extending down through said guide means; a wrench structure detachably supported in said guide means and slidably receiving said drill stem to oscillate same; and connections for oscillating said wrench means in-' cluding a pair of cables running from the wrench means over pulleys and along the guide rails to the power hoisting equipment, for oscillating said wrench means.

5. In combination with the hammer guide rails of fluid pressure operated pile driving hammer apparatus having power hoisting equipment: guide means detachably mounted adjacent the lower ends of said guide rails and having an aperture between said guide rails for slidably and oscillatably receiving a drill stem; adaptor means having portions respectively embracing said guide rails and interposed between same and said guide means to retain the latter in position; a drill stem detachably and oscillatably connected at its upper end to the hammer assembly and extending down through said guide means; an oscillatable wrench structure detachably supported in said guide means and slidably receiving said drill stem to oscillate same; and connections for oscillating said wrench means including a pair of cables running therefrom to the power hoisting equipment.

EDWARD A. SMITH.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 708,657 Osgood Sept. 9, 1902 2,056,744 Smith Oct. 6, 1936 2,072,526 Morrison Mar. 2, 1937 2,096,943 Templeton Oct. 26, 1937 2,107,556 Watson Feb. 8, 1938 FOREIGN PATENTS Number Country Date 798,508 France 1936

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US708657 *Feb 6, 1902Sep 9, 1902Ralph R OsgoodDredge.
US2056744 *Nov 15, 1933Oct 6, 1936Raymond Concrete Pile CoPile driver
US2072526 *Aug 23, 1934Mar 2, 1937Ingersoll Rand CoMounting for rock drills
US2096943 *Aug 29, 1935Oct 26, 1937Templeton John BPile driving attachment
US2107556 *Feb 28, 1936Feb 8, 1938Leston WatsonDrilling mechanism
FR798508A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3177954 *Sep 17, 1956Apr 13, 1965Rand William WSubaqueous drilling apparatus
US3231032 *Apr 5, 1960Jan 25, 1966Atlas Copco AbApparatus for drilling in earth covered rock
US3511320 *Dec 3, 1968May 12, 1970Horn Construction Co IncBottom brace with reversely acting power cable connections for shifting and holding pile hammer leads forward and backward and in laterally inclined batter positions
US3866697 *Jul 12, 1972Feb 18, 1975Tetra TechDrilling system
US3919816 *May 1, 1974Nov 18, 1975Raymond Int IncMast supporting adjustability device
US3961673 *Mar 24, 1975Jun 8, 1976Maschinen- Und Bohrgerate-Fabrik Alfred Wirth & Co., K.G.Drilling apparatus
DE4104992A1 *Feb 19, 1991Aug 20, 1992Bergwerksverband GmbhVorrichtung zur zielgenauen steuerung von ueberlagerungsbohrungen
Classifications
U.S. Classification173/29, 173/127, 173/196, 173/151, 175/435, 173/131
International ClassificationE21B15/04, E21B15/00
Cooperative ClassificationE21B15/04
European ClassificationE21B15/04