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Publication numberUS2599191 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 3, 1952
Filing dateJul 2, 1947
Priority dateJul 2, 1947
Publication numberUS 2599191 A, US 2599191A, US-A-2599191, US2599191 A, US2599191A
InventorsRoland J Meunier
Original AssigneeRoland J Meunier
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Dental brush having looped bristles
US 2599191 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 3, 1952 R. J. MEUNIER 2,599,191

DENTAL BRUSH HAVING LOOPED BRISTLES Filed July 2, 1947 INVENT ROLAND J. Meu I R Patented June 3, 1952 UNITE D STATES FPAT'EN T O F F I CE 2,599,191 ilJENTAIJ BRUSH HAVINGLOOPED BRISTLES Roland J. Meunier, 'southbridge Mass.

AprilicationJulyQ, 1947, 'SeflalNo. 758,651

hygienic type.

Qne :of the principal objects or the invention is to provide a hygienic type brush and more particularly a dental brush for use by individuals having disease of the gums such as "pyorrhea or other sensitivemouth'tis'sue wherebyithe bristles of 'the brush will have arelativ'ely smooth :side surface contact and'will'have anon-irritating cleansing and massagingfunction "duringuse.

Another object ismto provide brushes 0f the above character .with bristles whose effective portions are endless and will :have side surface contact Withthe means engaged thereby during :use. Another "object is to provide brushes of the above character witha plurality of looped bristles in the form of endless loops disposed in diiferent directional relations with respect to each other so as to not only have the function of brushing off foreign :matter but also .have a tendency to hold and withdraw saidforeignmatter in the direction of the; pullof the brush.

Another'object is to provide brushes of the above character with looped type bristles-of dif-.

ferent dimensional characteristics.

Another object is .to provide brushes of the above character having itslooped bristle portions formed to different initially controlled shapes.

:4 Claims. (Cl.-15167) Another object is to provide brushes 'of the above character having the special relation of the bristles controlled so as tofunction cooperatively with the shape characteristics thereof.

Other objects and advantages :of the invention will become apparent from 'theifo'llowing description .taken in connection with theaccom'panying drawings and it will be apparent that many changesmay be made in the details of construction, arrangement of partsan-d steps of the process shown and described Without departing .from' the spirit of the invention as expressed in "the accompanying claims. I,:therefore, do not-.wishto of the invention;

Fig. 2 is a side elevational view showing a modified form of the invention;

Fig. 3 is a sectional View takenias online 3-3 "of Fig. 1 and looking inth'e direction'indicated by the arrows;

Fig. 4 is a view similar to Fig. 3 of a further modification;

Fig.5 is "a plan view Fofta further modification;

and

Fig. 6 i is ."a view ig'eneral'ly similar to-'Fig.'5 'of a still further modification.

Although the present invention relates broadly to bru'sh'es of the hygienic type,'it is directediparti'cularly to the provision 'of "a "dental brush "adapte'diparticularly for use by individuals having irritated or diseased tissues particularly of the gums as inc'ases oi pyorrhea'orsimilar conditions of the mouth. Most known prior art types of dental brushes embody a plurality of closely :re-

massaging characteristics but also-with which the bristles of said brushes willalways have side surface contact-'with-the tissues of the mouth thereby having a less irri-tating'and more comfortable effect.

Although the drawings and-the following specifie'ation show and describea dental brush, it is to 'be understood that the same basic features and constructuraldetails maybe embodied in any brush desired for hygienic use or the like.

Referring more particularly to the drawings wherein like characters of reference desig-nate like parts throughout the several views, the device embodying the invention comprises a handle ha'vinga head 8 inwhicha .pluralityof bristles-9 are'anchored. 'The'sai'd :handle 1 and the head 'B 'm'ay beformed of any desirable material suchas aluminum or other desirable'metals 'or of plastics,

artificial resins or the like such as cellulose acetate, cellulose nitrate, methyl methacrylate or other known materials.

The bristles 9, as shown in Figs. '1 i-and 3, are made in the 'form of strands bent to fo'rmend loops It! and having their ends "H anchored in the head'B. This anchoring may be accomplished by initially forming a plurality of connection openings throughout one of the side surfaces of the head'and by anchoringthe ends of thestr'andsof the "bristles therein by means of a suitable "adhesive I 2 such as a solution ofcellulose nitrate in acetone, 'amyl acetate, ethyl acet'ateand the like or any known commercial water-insolubleorganic cement may be used. .If desired, the sidewalls of the openings orzr'ecesses may becrowded in about the bristles to anchor them within the openings by the application of heat and pressure adjacent the openings. With the latter method, no adhesives would be required.

The bristles 9 may be formed of hair, nylon, plastics or any other suitable materiaL, They are preferably formed from initially fine strands cut to desired lengths and bent to form the end loops I0.

As shown in Fig. l, the various bristles are nested in contiguous relation with each other and some of the bristles, as shown at l3, are of a length less than the adjacent bristles so as to be nested below the upper bristles Hi. This nesting is shown centrally of Fig. 3 and may comprise two or more bristles of different lengths as desired. One set of bristles is preferably formed to one standard length while the other bristles are formed to other controlled standard lengths which, after being looped, will provide bristles of the controlled lengths desired. In Fig. 1, the outer looped portions l lie preferably in the same plane while the inner looped portions I 3 lie in a different plane below the plane of the looped portions Ill. The outer side bristles are arranged in substantially parallel rows while the inner or intermediate bristles are disposed in substantially normal relation with the outer bristles. The effect, however, is that regardless of the direction of motion imparted to the bristles, said bristles will always have side surface contact with the means engaged. The pressure directed to the brush will determine the extent of function of the various bristles. It is quite apparent that if sufiicient pressure is imparted on the brush, the inner bristles of less length will come into play through greater distortion of the outer bristles.

It is particularly pointed out that due to the characteristic structure of a dental brush of the above character that the bristles will have much longer life and durability than those of the commonly known prior art type. This is due to the fact that different portions of the bristles are brought into play at different directions of movement of the brush during use.

The bristles not only tend to loosen foreign matter from the gums and teeth but also have the function of trapping said foreign matter internally of the looped portions thereby providing more positive means for removing said foreign matter during the cleansing action.

As stated above, regardless of the direction of movement of the bristles, they will always have side surface contact with the gums and teeth and yet are of sufficient length to enable them to readily conform to different shape characteristics of the surfaces engaged and will readily extend within cavities recesses, as well as spaces between the teeth to impart a full cleansing and massaging effect.

As shown in Fig. 2, the bristles 9 may be formed to controlled varying lengths and may be arranged in several different patterns to meet different requirements.

In Fig. 4, the bristles, instead of having substantially parallel sides as shown in Fig. 3, are provided with converging side portions so as to be positioned and anchored within a single recess.

In Fig. 5, the bristles are illustrated as being arranged in two groups angularly disposed relative to each other with the angle being substantially at a right angle.

In Fig. 6, the bristles 9 are arranged in spaced groups [4 having portions of the bristles of each respective group disposed substantially normal to other portions and having intermediate groups I5 lying in substantially parallel relation with each other and disposed in a direction lengthwise of the head 8 but staggered relative to each other in accordance with the angle of the respective bristles of the adjacent group I 4.

The bristles, in all instances, are so dispersed and angularly related as to have an entrapping function as to the gathering up of foreign matter in different directions of movement.

Although the heads of the various constructions shown are preferably initially formed with a plurality of spaced grooves or recesses in which the ends of the bristles may be anchored and held therein by suitable adhesive such as set forth above, the said bristles may be first formed into the given patterns desired and the head 8 may thereafter be formed in connected relation with the bristles as by injection molding or the like or the bristles may be placed in assembled and anchored relation with the head by any known conventional means. The preferred method, however, of forming the brush is to initially control the length of the strands and to form a loop or bend therein, which loop or bend constitutes the free end of the bristles in the finished product and thereafter anchoring the ends of the strands internally of the head 8 in any conventional manner.

Considerable importance is stressed on the distribution and pattern arrangement of the bristles for by disposing the bristles in different angled relation to each other and by spacing said bristles a distance. apart substantially equal to the diameter of the strands of the bristles, greater cleansing effect is obtained.

While the brush is primarily desired for cleansing, it is particularly advantageous in that it has a non-irritating massaging effect which, as prescribed by several leading dentists, is decidedly advantageous.

In addition to the above advantages, the bristles will have greater life and durability.

While the bristles are shown as preferably having a rounded loop end, said loop may be so controlled as to be substantially square in shape or may be given various different shapes as desired, the essential factor being, however, that said bristles will always have side surface contact with the gums or adjacent tissues of the mouth thereby having a less irritating effect. While the bristles are shown and described as preferably being looped, it is pointed out that the diameter of the bristles is controlled according to the materials used for forming said bristles so that said bristles will have desirable and sufficient stiffness and rigidity while yet introducing a comfortable massaging and cleansing characteristic.

While applicant has shown and described a dental brush, it is particularly pointed out that shaving brushes, hair brushes, face or hand brushes may be similarly formed with the hair brushes being particularly desirable for use with tender or diseased scalps.

From the foregoing description, it will be seen that simple, efiicient and economical means have been provided for accomplishing all of the objects and advantages of the invention.

Having described my invention I claim:

1. A tooth brush comprising along and narrow head and a long and narrow handle, a plurality of looped bristles having both of their ends embedded in adjacent spaced relation with each different lengths with the outer ends of the loops of said different lengths lying in different planes substantially parallel with the adjacent side surface of the head, said loops of smaller lengths being arranged in nested arrangement with adjacent loops of greater length whereby the bristles of the respective groups of greater lengths will be less resistant to distortion than the bristles of the groups of shorter lengths and the variation of pressure directed to the brush during the use thereof will determine the extent of function of the various bristles.

2. A tooth brush comprising a long and narrow head and a long and narrow handle, a plurality of looped bristles having both of their ends embedded in adjacent spaced relation with each other within one side surface of said head with the said bristles extending outwardly of said side surface, said bristles being arranged in groups of relatively large looped portions with the outer ends of said loops lying substantially in a single plane substantially parallel with the adjacent side surface of the head and with the other of said groups being formed of smaller loops arranged in nested relation with the large loops whereby the bristles of the first group will be less resistant to distortion than the bristles of the second group and the pressure directed to the brush during the use thereof will determine the extent of function of the various bristles.

3. A tooth brush comprising a long and narrow head and a long and narrow handle, a plurality of looped bristles having both of their ends embedded in adjacent spaced relation with each other within one side surface of said head with the said bristles extending outwardly of said side surface, said loops being arranged in groups of different lengths with the outer ends of the loops of said different lengths lying in different planes substantially parallel with the adjacent side surface of the head, said loops of smaller lengths being arranged in nested arrangement with adjacent loops of greater length whereby the bristles of the respective groups of greater lengths will be less resistant to distortion than the bristles of the groups of shorter lengths and the variation of pressure directed to the brush during the use thereof will determine the extent of function of the various bristles, said looped bristles of some of said groups being in angular relation with the longitudinal axis of the head and others being alternatively arranged in substantially parallel relation with each other and substantially parallel with the longitudinal axis of the head.

4. A tooth brush comprising a long and narrow head and a long and narrow handle, a plurality of looped bristles having both of their ends embedded in adjacent spaced relation with each other within one side surface of said head with the said bristles extending outwardly of said side surface, said bristles being arranged in groups of relatively large looped portions with the outer ends of said loops lying substantially in a single plane substantially parallel with the adjacent side surface of the head and with the other of said groups being formed of smaller loops arranged in nested relation with the large loops whereby the bristles of the first group will be less resistant to distortion than the bristles of the second group and the pressure directed to the brush during the use thereof will determine the extent of function of the various bristles, said looped bristles of some of said groups being in angular relation with the longitudinal axis of the head and other being alternatively arranged in substantially parallel relation with each other and substantially parallel with the longitudinal axis of the head.

ROLAND J. MEUNIER.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 1,179,426 Hamilton Apr. 18, 1916 1,351,535 Pierce Aug. 31, 1920 1,537,425 Farwell May 12, 1925 2,037,135 Johnson Apr. 14, 1936 2,209,173 Russell July 23, 1940 FOREIGN PATENTS Number Country Date 165,457 France Jan. 20, 1933 240,032 Great Britain Sept. 24, 1925 464,988 Great Britain Apr. 28, 1937

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2718024 *Apr 19, 1950Sep 20, 1955Prophylactic Brush CoHair brushes for personal use
US3100309 *Aug 27, 1959Aug 13, 1963James C GambinoToothbrush
US4211217 *Apr 23, 1979Jul 8, 1980L'orealBrush for brushing the hair or massaging the cutaneous covering
US4616374 *May 28, 1985Oct 14, 1986William NovogrodskyMicrofloss toothbrush
US5273425 *Sep 28, 1992Dec 28, 1993Hoagland Richard WPortable pet teeth cleaning abrasive instrument
US5678273 *Mar 20, 1996Oct 21, 1997Porcelli; V. LorenzoDisposable oral hygiene applicator
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US5938673 *May 14, 1998Aug 17, 1999Colgate-Palmolive CompanyTongue cleaning device
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US6085380 *Sep 22, 1997Jul 11, 2000Lever Brothers Company, Division Of Conopco, Inc.Bathing implement constructed of looped filaments
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Classifications
U.S. Classification15/167.1, 15/186
International ClassificationA46B9/04
Cooperative ClassificationA46B9/005, A46B2200/1066
European ClassificationA46B9/00E