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Publication numberUS2599330 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 3, 1952
Filing dateJan 6, 1947
Priority dateJan 6, 1947
Publication numberUS 2599330 A, US 2599330A, US-A-2599330, US2599330 A, US2599330A
InventorsCorwill Jackson
Original AssigneeJackson Vibrators
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Machine for placement of concrete and the like
US 2599330 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 3, 1952 c. JACKSON MACHINE FOR PLACEMENT OF CONCRETE AND THE LIKE Filed Jan. 6, 194':

2 SHEETS-SHEET l a N INVENTOR.

, Cora/17! Jackson 5 mm a M ATTORNEY.

June 3, 1952 O 2,599,330

MACHINE FOR PLACEMENT OF CONCRETE AND THE LIKE ya 25 Z6 25 Filed Jan. 6, 1947 INVENTOR. C on!!! Jackson ATTORNEY.

Patented June 3, 1952 MACHINE FOR PLACEMENT OF CONCRETE AND THE LIKE Corwill Jackson, Ludington, Mich., assignor to Jackson Vibrators, Inc., Ludington, Mich., a

corporation of Michigan Application January 6, 1947, Serial No. 720,363

10 Claims.

This invention relates to improvements in machines for the placement of concrete and the like.

The main objects of the invention are:

First, to provide a concrete placement machine which is highly eflicient and of large capacity and at the same time adapted for manual manipulation with a minimum of effort on the part of the operator.

Second, to provide a concrete placement machine including a vibratory member adapted to forwardly support a substantial mass of concrete as it is advanced against the same in which the vibratory means act to advance the machine.

Third, to provide a machine of the character described employing a relatively long vibratory member in which the vibrations are of substantially uniform amplitude throughout the length of the vibratory member.

Fourth, to provide a machine having these advantages which is comparatively simple in structure and light in weight and at the same time highly efiicient.

Further objects relating to details and economies of the structure will appear from the description to follow. The invention is defined and pointed out in the claims.

A structure which embodies the features of the invention is illustrated in the accompanying drawings, in which:

Fig. 1 is a perspective view of a machine embodying my invention positioned upon forms for the material to be placed, the machine being supported by the forms for advancement over the surface of the material and against the material which may be placed on the foundation of a pavement or other slab to be laid.

Fig. 2 is an enlarged fragmentary view taken on the broken line 22 of Fig. 3.

Fig. 3 is an enlarged fragmentary view showing portions of the rear side of the vibratory member and one of the vibration synchronizing or tuning elements mounted thereon.

Fig. 4 is an enlarged fragmentary view in vertical section on line 4-4 of Fig. 1.

Fig. 5 is a fragmentary end view with the handle adjusted to position for tilting the machine on its supporting rollers for translating the machine in inoperative position.

Fig. 6 is a fragmentary top plan view showing portions of the vibratory and screed members and vibration absorbing means therebetween.

It is frequently desirable to provide screeds of the type illustrated of considerable length running up to twenty feet or more in length. In the structure illustrated the plank-like Vi- 2 bratory member is vibrated by an electric motor having an unbalanced rotor and this is desirably applied or mounted at a central point. Possibly due to the considerable length and possibly to variations in material, dead spots or zones, or nodes may occur,-that is, zones in which the-amplitude of the vibrations is minimized or objectionably reduced as compared to the vibrations at the point of attachment of the vibrating member.

It is one of the main objects of this invention to provide means whereby these dead spots or nodes may be eliminated or minimized-to cause the vibratory member to'vibrate with substantially uniform amplitude throughout, and at the same time provide means by which the vibrations impart a highly desirable forward movement to the machine, thereby minimizing the manual effort required to advance the machine.

The embodiment of the invention illustrated in the accompanying drawing comprises a vibratory member or element designated generally by the numeral l and a trailing screed member designated by the numeral 2. The vibratory member comprises a plank-like member 3 disposed vertically edgewise and which in the embodiment illustrated is of multi-ply stock. This member desirably has a shoe 4 which serves as a wear plate or reinforcing member. Reinforcing and mounting plates 5, 6, 6 and l, I are mounted on the front side of the member 3. The screed member 2 is formed ofa plank disposed vertically edgewise and is desirably provided with a shoe 8. The vibratory member and the screed member are connected by vibration absorbing means 9 and ID. These connections are disclosed in my Patent No. 2,449,851 granted September 21, 1948, and are not herein specifically claimed.

Rollers II are mounted on the rearwardly projecting arms I2 on the screed member 2 and adapted to travel on the forms l3, but being out of engagement therewith when the machine is in operative position supported by the forms l3. Handles l4 are pivotally mounted at l5 on the swiveled members [6 comprising a depending shaft having a pivotal bearing. in a sleeve or tubular member disposed at the rear of the screed member 2 as shown in Fig. 5; This permits the vertical and also horizontal swinging movement of the handles which are provided with handle bars I! at their front ends. With the handles thus arranged the operators may stand at the outer side of the forms l3 and the machine manipulated on the forms.

The hooks I8 are disposed on the vibratory member at its ends and face outwardly so that the handles may be engaged with the hooks as shown in Fig. for tilting the machine rearwardly upon the rollers II for manipulation on the screeds or on the ground.

In the embodiment of my inventionsillustrated the vibrating unit I9 is in the form of *an'electric motor having a rotor 20 provided with an unbalancing weight 2|. The electrical connections are indicated at 22 and .23, the motor .being controlled from the switch box 24 on one of the handles. The motor is mounted so that the rotor rotates counter-clockwise as viewed in Fig. 4. This tends to advance'the machine on the forms.

As I pointed out, there are'frequently dead spots or nodes in the vibratory member in which the vibrations are minimized. This appears to be due in part to the comparatively light structure of the vibratory member and partially to the dampening 'efiect resulting from the thrust load -on the material'treated. :However, it should be noted th-at'inlong vibratory members of quite heavy structure some parts may vibrate with substantially less amplitude than other 'parts. 'I "overcome this by providing what I term tuning devices or vibration synchronizing devices or means mounted on the vibratory member. Desirably, the dead spots" or nodes are determined before the tuning or vibration harmonizing elements are mounted.

Myuse of the term dead spots or nodes does not imply complete absence "of vibration.

but-it is used in thesense that in these zones the vibrations *are'relatively slight in amplitude as'compared to other zones, and it is desirable that' the vibrations shall be approximately 1mi- Torm in amplitude throughout'the length of the vibratory member; this not ionly from "the standpoint of effective treatment of the material placedjbut'also in the matter of-getting amaximum advance travel as aresultio'f the vibra- 'tions.

'In'the embodiment illustrated the vibration synchronizing assemblies comprise weightslfi. These "weights are desirably supported in a plane in advance of the front plane of the vibratory member and preferably in substantially thevertical plane of the axis of the unbalanced rotor. The weights '25 are supported byforked orbiiurcated supports 26 having angled arms Tl, theforwardly projecting ends 28 of which overhang the vibratory member. These arms 21 are tiltably and resiliently supported by "means of pins 29 carried 1 by the brackets '30 arranged on the rear side of thevibratorymemher at or adjacent the top thereof.

"The pins 29 are provided with cushioning sleeves 3! of rubber which are 'freceivedwithin the collars '32 on the arms'ZI. Bolts 33project 'rearwardly from the'vibrator'y member through the lugs 34, projecting upwardly from 'the "crotch or the support. Spacing sleeves 35'are 'arrangedon these boltsbetween the lugs and the rear side of the vibratory member. The disk-like cushioning elements 36 of rubber or other suitable resilient material are arranged on the "bolts, being supported by oppositely disposedicupped holders 3! "and '38, the bolts being-provided with adjusting nuts 39 and lock nuts 40. By adjusting these cushioning members 36, that is, increasing "or decreasing'the resilient supporting action thereof on "the weight supports, the device may be tuned to synchronize the vibrations of the vibratory member so that they are of substantially uniform amplitude throughout the length thereof. I am able to accomplish this result, that is, the result of synchronizing the vibrations, without "the additionzof excess structural weight in the "vibratory element itself disposed and attached to the vibrating member The weights 25 are in zones thereof which vibrate with approximatelythelgreatest amplitude. In the vibrating member illustrated the zones of greatest amplitude are disposed adjacent the upper edge of the vibrating member approximately midway the rotary unbalancing weight 2! and the end supporting "carriages. In operative use of the machine, as the machine advances surplus concrete accumulates forward the lower edge portion of the vibrating member I. Since the vibrations set up in the vibrating member by the rotary .unbalancing weight 2! follow .the'ipath of least resistance the amplitude along the 'upper edge of the "vibrating member becomes excessive while the amplitude "along 'the lower edge in contact with the accumulated concrete diminishes to the vanishing point as .the load of cement increases forwardly of ltheilower edge of the vibrating member. The purpose of the weights, ;particularly on 'vibrating fmembers of a considerable length is'to vcountei'bal'ance the load of accumulated'concrete :forward the lower edge'of the-vibratingmember. .As the excessive amplitude along the upper edge of the vibrating member is restrained by the load "of the weights 25 the oscillations acresequalized .andthe vibrating :member" functions efficiently. Inplacing :concrete or. :relatively stiff, low water content, it is imperative .that vibrations :of tmaximum intensity be transmitted to the :concrete .and :not dissipated :in excess amplitude .ialong the upper edge1oftthevibrating member. The means previously described including the :adjusting nuts :39' for adjusting the degree of compression LOfiI'UQb'bGI disk-like elements 35 enables the :user to tune the vibratingmemberito the consistency of'th'econcrete, thuswhen placing concretetof relatively low water content the nuts .39 are tightenedtoiincrease the degree of compression of the rubber elements :36 so that the vibrationsinthe upper edge portion otthe vibrating member are more readily transmitted to theweights 2 5 which dampens the amplitude :ofthevibrationsinrsuch upper edge portion and increases the amplitude in the lower edge portion contacting the 'concreteof relatively low water content, conversely concrete of relative :hig'h workability or "high water content does not restrain the amplitu'de'of vibration of the lower edge portion "to thesame :degree as'does the concrete of low water content, .hence the nuts .39 are loosened to decrease the force of compression on the cushioning elements 36 so that the vibrations in the :upper edgeIportion are transmitted with less force to the weights '25 which increases the amplitude of vibration in such upper edge'por-tion and decreases the-amplitude in the lower edge portion contacting the concrete of relatively high water content.

While in "the embodiment illustrated I have shown the reinforcing plates on the vibratory member, satisfactory -results may be had :-without "these "reinforcing elements. One advan- "tage -"of the structure .is "thatthe parts .other than the punk-nae vibratory elements "may be compactly "crated, shipped 'and readily assembled with a plank or other suitable vibratory member or element by the user This is a very decided advantage inasmuch as in the completely assembled machines a large amount of material is required for crating, and a relatively large amount of shipping space is also required.

In the embodiment illustrated the guard or retaining members 4| are adjustably mounted on rods to adapt the machine for different widths of pavements. This feature, however, is substantially illustrated in my application for Letters Patent above referred to.

I have illustrated and described my improvements in a highly practical embodiment thereof. I have not attempted to illustrate or describe various adaptations and modifications which I contemplate, as it is believed that this disclosure will enable those skilled in the art to embody or adapt the invention as may be desired.

Having thus described my invention, what I claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent, is:

1. In a machine of the class described, the combination of a plank-like shaped vibratory member disposed vertically edgewise and adapted to support at the front thereof a substantial mass of concrete as it is advanced against the same, a plank-like screed member disposed vertically edgewise in substantially rearwardly spaced relation to said vibratory member, vibration absorbing connections between said vibratory and screed members whereby they are connected as a unit and coact to mutually support each other in upright position, an unbal- 1 anced rotor mounted on said vibratory member with its axis disposed longitudinally of the vibratory member, rollers mounted on said screed member at the rear thereof, said rollers being normally out of engagement with forms on which the vibratory member and screed members may be supported in operative relation to work, and handles pivotally and swingably mounted at the rear of the screed member adjacent the ends thereof, said vibratory member being provided with hooks forward of the pivotal connection of the handle with the screed with which the handles may be engaged to tilt the assembly rearwardly to be supported by and for manipulation on said rollers.

2. In a machine of the class described, the combination of a plank-like shaped vibratory member disposed vertically edgewise and adapted to support at the front thereof a substantial mass of material treated as it is advanced against the same, an unbalanced rotor mounted on said vibratory member centrally thereof with its axis disposed longitudinally of the vibratory member, a weight support having angled arms projecting forwardly above the vibratory member, pairs of supporting brackets for said arms mounted on the rear side of the vibratory member adjacent the top thereof and provided with arm supporting pins having cushioning sleeves thereon, said arms being provided with collars supported by said cushioning sleeves, a weight mounted on the forward ends of said arms in a plane substantially in advance of the vertical plane of the vibratory member, an adjusting bolt for said arms projecting rearwardly from said vibratory member, said arms being connected at their lower ends and provided with a lug receiving said bolt, there being a spacer sleeve on the bolt between the lug and the said vibratory member, and resilient compressible uniform 6 cushioning means disposed on said bolt in supporting engagement with said lug, the bolt being provided with means for adjusting said cushioning means.

3. In a machine of the class described, the combination of a plank-like shaped vibratory member disposed vertically edgewise and adapted to support at the front thereof a substantial mass of concrete as it is advanced against the same, an unbalanced rotor mounted on said vibratory member with its axis disposed longitudinally of the vibratory member, a weight provided with supporting arms, brackets pivotally supporting said arms mounted on the rear side of the vibratory member adjacent the top thereof and provided with arm supporting pins having cushioning means thereon, an adjusting bolt for said arms projecting rearwardly from said vibratory member, and resilient compressible cushioning means disposed on said bolt in supporting engagement with said arms, the bolt being provided with means engaging said cushioning means on the side thereof opposite from its engagement with said arms for adjusting said cushioning means. I

4. In a machine of the class combination of an elongated vibratory member adapted to support at the front thereof a substantial mass of concrete as it is advanced against the same, an unbalanced rotor mounted on said vibratory member with its axis disposed longitudinally of the vibratory member, means connected to said vibratory member for manually manipulating the same, means for causing said vibratory member to vibrate with substantial uniformity throughout, comprising weight supports having angled arms projecting forwardly above the vibratory member, supporting brackets for said arms mounted on the rear side of the vibratory member and provided with arm supporting pins having cushioning members thereon on which said arms are supported, a weight mounted on the forward ends of said arms, an adjusting bolt for said arms projecting rearwardly from said vibratory member, there being a spacer sleeve on the bolt between the arms and the said vibratory member, and adjustable resilient compressible adjusting means disposed on said bolt in thrust engagement with said arms.

5. In a machine of the class described, the combination of a vibratory member adapted to rest upon forms to be supported thereby for forward advancement thereon, means for vibrating said vibratory member at high frequency comprising an unbalanced rotor mounted on said vibratory member with its axis disposed longitudinally thereof and rotatable in a direction forwardly below its axis to advance the vibratory member, and means for causing said vibratory member to vibrate with substantially amplitude throughout, comprising weight supports having angled arms projecting forwardly above the vibratory member, supporting pins for said arms mounted on the rear side of the vibratory member, there being cushioning means between said pins and said arms supportingly connecting said arms to said pins, the rear ends of the arms projecting down below said pins, a weight mounted on the forward ends of said arms, an adjusting bolt carried by said vibratory member, there being a spacer sleeve on the bolt between the arms and said vibratory member, and resilient compressible cushioning means disposed on said bolt described, the

zadj ustable means rearwardlyof saidarms to receive the thrust ofthearms.in-opposition to said weight,.and engaging said cushioning means on the side thereof oppositefrom said warms for varying the resilienceof saidithrust cushioning. means.

.6.=In .a machine of the class described, the .icombination ofa vibratory member adapted to -rest upon=forms to be .supported thereby for forward advancement thereon, means for vi- :brating said vibratory member at high frequency "pins being mounted on the .rear side of the wvi'bratory member,

there being cushioning means between said pins and said arms, the rear ends of the arms projecting down below said pins and the opposite ends of said arms 'carrying sai'd weights and extending forwardly of said supporting pins, an adjusting bolt car- .ried by said vibratory member, and resilient compressible cushioning means disposed on said bolt rearwardly of said arms to receive the thrust of-the arms in opposition to said weight, and adjustable means engaging said cushioning means onktheside thereof opposite from said arms for varying the resilience of said thrust cushioning means.

7..In a machine of the class described, the combination of a vibratory member adapted to 185171113011 forms to be supported thereby for forward advancement, means'for vibratingsaid vibratory member athigh frequency "comprising an unbalanced rotor on said vibratory member with 'its :axis disposed longitudinally, a weight, :a lever pivotally mounted intermediate its ends "tosaidvibratory'member, one arm of said lever supporting said weight adjacent the upper edge "ofithe-vibratory membenthe other arm of the lever extending downwardly from the pivot thereof, and means for adjustably connecting said downwardly extending arm to said vibrator;

- member.

8min a machine of the class described, the combination of a plank-like shaped vibratory -member disposed vertically edgewise and'adapted 'to support a=substantial mass of material treated at the front thereof as it is advanced against -;the same, means :for vibrating said vibratory member carried thereby, means for inducing vibrations of approximately uniform amplitude in spaced relation 'to said vibrating 'means comprising a Weight-and means for resiliently supporting said weight on said vibratory .member in substantially spaced relation from said vi =bratin-g 'means and one end of said vibratory member and adjacentthe top edge of said vibratory -member in a zone of said vibratory imember (if-approximately maximum amplitude of vibration, and-means for varying theremember and disposed relative-to said vibratory member and weight Supporting: means tozadjust the limit of the range of movement of the weight supporting means relative to the vibratory member due to the resiliency of the weight supporting means.

9. In a machine of the class described, the combination of a plank-like shaped vibratory member disposed vertically edgewise and adapted to support a substantial mass of material treated at the front thereof as it is advanced against the 591116,,311 unbalanced rotor mountedon said vibratory membercentrally thereof andwith its axis disposed longitudinally of the vibratory member, means for inducing vibrations of approximately uniform amplitude throughout the length of said vibratory member comprising weights and means for resiliently supporting said weights on said vibratory member between said rotor and the opposite ends of said vibratory member and in substantially spaced relation from said rotor and opposite ends and adjacent the top edge of said vibratory member and in zones of said vibratorymember-of approximate ly--maximum amplitude of vibration .of'said vibratory member, and means adjustable relative to said vibratory member and disposed relative to said weight supporting means-and vibratory member to adjust the limit of the range of, movement of the weight supporting means relative to the vibratory member due to the resiliency of the weight supporting means,

10. In a'machine of the class described, the combination of a plank-like shaped vibratory member disposed vertically edgewise and adapted to support-a substantial mass of concrete at the front thereof as it is advanced against the same, means'for vibrating said vibratory member carried thereby, a weigh-t, means 'for resiliently supporting said weight adjacent the topedge of the vibratorymember and in a zone of said vibratory member of approximately maximum amplitude of vibration, and means adjustable relative to said vibratory member and disposed relative to said weight supporting means and vibratory member to adjust the limit of the range of movement the weight supporting means relative to the vibratory'member due to the resiliency of the weight supporting means.

CORWILL JACKSON.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 1,959,101 Sloan -Apr. 17, 1934. 1,550,102 Schlueter Aug. 18, 1935 2,223,024 Beierlein Nov..26, 1940 2,224,508 Baily Dec. 10, 1.940 2,248,247 Nichols July 8, 1941 2,306,126 Jackson Dec. 22, 1942 2,449,851 Jackson Sept. 21, 1948

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2687071 *Apr 23, 1952Aug 24, 1954Day William PRoad working apparatus
US2909970 *Jan 11, 1954Oct 27, 1959Jackson VibratorsVibratory compactor for asphaltic and other materials
US3422731 *Feb 21, 1966Jan 21, 1969Sebastian Manuel BDevice for concreting and leveling of inclined and curved surfaces
US3665820 *Dec 21, 1970May 30, 1972Edoco Technical ProductsConcrete consolidating and smoothing means for inserter apparatus
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Classifications
U.S. Classification404/114
International ClassificationE01C19/22, E01C19/40
Cooperative ClassificationE01C19/402
European ClassificationE01C19/40B