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Publication numberUS2600501 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 17, 1952
Filing dateDec 28, 1948
Priority dateOct 27, 1947
Publication numberUS 2600501 A, US 2600501A, US-A-2600501, US2600501 A, US2600501A
InventorsWilliam Higgs George
Original AssigneeWilliam Higgs George
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Oxygen tent or like enclosure
US 2600501 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 17, 1952 5, w, 2,600,501

OXYGEN TENT OR LIKE ENCLOSURE Filed D90. 28, 1948 i 2 SHEETS-V-SHEET 1 INVENTOR G-EoReE WILLIAM limes ATTORNEY Jline 1 7, 1952 w H|GG$ 2,600,501

OXYGEN TENT OR LIKE ENCLOSURE Fi1ed Dec. 28, 1948 2 SHEETS-SHEET 2 wwm Patented June 17,1952

George William Higgs, London, England Application December 28, 1948, Serial No. 67,699 In Great Britain October 27, 1947 8 Claims. (Cl. 128 -1) This invention relates to oxygen tents and like enclosures for maintaining infants and small children in a controlled atmosphere as, for example, when travelling in aircraft at altitudes where a supply of oxygen must be given to maintain comfort, or in hospitals and the like for medical purposes. The object of the invention is to provide a tent or enclosure which is collapsible and, when collapsed, is extremely compact so that it may be readily transported.

According to the invention, an oxygen tent or like enclosure for the purpose herein set forth comprises a base and side and end walls of gasproof sheet material, stiifening means for said base and walls, and flaps extending along the upper edges of said side and end walls, the said flaps being adapted for connection one to another by fastening means at the corners of the enclosure to form a continuous in-turned rim about the top of said enclosure.

The base and walls are preferably stiffened by metal frames, and the enclosure conveniently comprises two separable units, one consisting of stiffened side walls connected by flexible gasproof material at their end and bottom edges to form ends and a base, and the other consisting of a stiffened base and stiffened end walls, each said unit being adapted to fold flat when separated from the other unit, and said other unit fitting within the first unit when both are extended.

The invention is hereinafter described with reference to the accompanying drawings, in which:

Figure 1 is a perspective view of an oxygen tent according to the invention for use in aircraft;

Figure 2 is a perspective view of the base and end stifieners of the tent shown in Figure 1;

Figure 3 is a perspective view of the tent in a fully folded condition;

Figure 4 is a perspective view similar to Figure 1 but with parts broken away to show the construction; and

Figure 5 is a detail.

Referring to the drawings, the oxygen tent comprises, when extended an open-topped en closure the opening of which can be covered, if desired, by a separate transparent cover, and is adapted to fold substantially fiat when out of use, thus facilitating transport and storage.

The tent is of rectangular parallelpiped shape, and consists of two main units, one comprising the sides III, which are stiffened, and a connecting strip of flexible sheet material extending between the end and bottom edges of the sides to form an outer base I l and outer end walls I2, and the other, which serves to hold the sides spaced apart, comprising a stifiened inner base l3 and two stiffened inner end walls 14.

The sides I0, inner base [3 and inner end walls It each comprise a frame of round metal bar, conveniently feth inch bright mild steel A transparent window I9 is provided in one side l0. Along the upper edges of the sides 10 and outer end walls l2 of the tent, flaps 2| are provided which, when held together at the corners by quick-release fasteners 22, form a continuous in turned rim about the edge of the tent.

A cover 23 is provided, which is adapted to be secured to the rim formed by the flaps 2|. by additional quick-release fasteners 24 at the corners, and further, similar fasteners 25 near .the longitudinal centre of the tent. The cover 23 is of transparent material strengthened around its edge, and across the middle by strips 26 of material similar to that constituting the covering of the tent.

A shackle 27, mounted on a plate 28 is secured to the centre of the lower edge of one side ofthe tent, the plate being located outside the. cover ing, and bolted, through the covering, to an internal plate 3| carrying a shackle 32, the arrangement being such that the lower frame member of the sideis clamped between the plates 28 and SI (see Figure 5). The outer shackle serves for anchoring the tent in position in an aircraft, and the inner shackle for the securing of a fireproof blanket 30 adapted to be wrapped around an infant in the tent. Additional shackles such as that shown at 33 in Figure 4 may be mounted on the tent to provide supplementary anchorage points, and carrying handles 34 are mounted at the upper edges of the sides.

An oxygen supply fitting 35 is mounted on one side wall I0, the fitting comprising a nozzle 36 projecting into the tent, a sight feed device 31, and a connection for a flexible supply pipe 38.

In use, the two units are assembled together, and held in position by quick-release fasteners 39 which secure the inner end walls M to the outer ends walls 12. The tent is intended to be placed in an aircraft so that it lies transversely of the aircraft with the main anchorage, shackle 21 aft, the infant who occupies it being wrapped in the fireproof blanket, the ends of which are connected together by suitable clips or catches, indicated at 4|. In the event of the aircraft crashing, the tent in held by the anchorage shackle against overturning, and the blanket 3B prevents the infant from being thrown violently against the forward side of the tent.

The cover 23 need not be fastened down permanently or completely, since oxygen tendsto remain in the tent due to its density being greater than that of air, but it serves to reduce the disturbance of the atmosphere in the tent, with consequent loss of oxygen, due to irregular flight of the aircraft, or other causes.

4 When the tent is not in use, the flaps 2| are separated at the corners by releasing the fastoners 22, and the inner base l3 and inner end walls M are removed after releasing the fasteners 39. The unit comprising the inner base l3 and inner end walls M is folded as shown in Figure 2, and the other unit is folded as shown in Figure 3, one side l0 being folded down on the outer base I! and the second side 9 being folded down over the first.

The device according to the invention is readily portable, is compact when out of use and, when in use, provides an enclosure in which an infant can be maintained in a controlled atmosphere but in which the infant readily accessible for feeding and other attention, and in which'there are no hard internal surfaces or projections which might injure the infant if it struck against them owing, for example, to violent movements of an aircraft in which it was travelling.

What I claim is:

1. An oxygen tent comprising a base and side and end walls of flexible gas-proof sheet material,

frame means for supporting said base and walls,

a flap extending along the upper edge of each of said walls, fastening means at the ends of said flaps for securing together the ends of each two flaps which meet at a corner of the tent so that said flaps form together a continuous inwardlydirected flange partially enclosing the top of the tent, and an oxygen inlet device mounted on one of said walls.

2. An oxygen tent comprising a base and side and end walls of flexible gas-proof sheetniaterial, a-s't'iffening unit inserted within said tent and comprising a base frame and end frames hingedly connected to said base frame, flaps extending along the upper edges of each of said walls, fastening means at the ends of said flaps for securing together the ends of each two flaps which meet at 4 a corner of the tent so that said flaps form together a continuous inwardly-directed flange partially enclosing the top of the tent, and an oxygen inlet device mounted on one of said walls.

3. An oxygen tent comprising a base and side and end walls of flexible gas-proof sheet material, the side walls comprising envelopes enclosing stiffening frames, a stifiening unit inserted within said tent and comprising a base frame and end frames and an envelope of gas-proof sheet ma-.

terial enclosing said base and end frames and connecting them for folding movement with respect toeach other, flaps extending along the upper edges of each of the side and end walls, fastening means at the ends of said flaps for securing together the ends of each two flaps which meet at a corner of the tent so that said flaps form together a continuous inwardly-dir'ecte'd flange partially enclosing the top of the tent, and an oxygen inlet device mounted on one of the side walls.

4. An oxygen tent according to claim 3, wherein padding is provided in the envelopes of gas: proof material enclosing the stiffening frames.

5. An oxygen tent according to claim 3, where in a transparent window is provided in one side wall of the tent.

6. An oxygen tent comprising a base and side and end walls of flexible gas-proof sheet material, frame means for supporting said base and walls, a flap extending along the upper edge of each of said walls, fastening means at the" ends of said flaps for securing together the ends of each two flaps which meet at a corner of the tent so that said flaps form together a continuous inwardlydirected flange partially enclosing the top of the tent, an oxygen inlet device mounted on one side wall of the tent, a flexible cover, and readily releas'able fastening means securing said flexible cover to the flaps forming the inturned flange.

'7. An oxygen tent according to claim 3, whereina shackle is provided externally at the lower edge of one side, and is anchored to the stiffening frame of that side.

8. An oxygen tent according'to claim 7, wherein a second shackle is provided internally oithe tent at the lower edge of one side, and the fixing means for both shackles comprise plates to'which the shackles are hinged, the said plates together forming a clamp secured by bolts to the stiffening frame.

GEORGE WILIJAM- I-I-IGGS.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 1,039,944 Hohlfeld Oct. 1, 1912 GI'QJSSO Oct. 3,

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US3318020 *Oct 12, 1964May 9, 1967Scott Aviation CorpBreathing mask leak detector and training aid
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Classifications
U.S. Classification600/22, D30/109, 5/89.1, 220/9.2, 5/98.1, 135/121, 128/205.26, 135/95
International ClassificationA62B31/00
Cooperative ClassificationA62B31/00
European ClassificationA62B31/00