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Publication numberUS2601440 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 24, 1952
Filing dateDec 28, 1949
Priority dateDec 28, 1949
Publication numberUS 2601440 A, US 2601440A, US-A-2601440, US2601440 A, US2601440A
InventorsKerrigan John P
Original AssigneeKerrigan John P
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Impact indicator for containers
US 2601440 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 24, 1952 J. P. KERRIGAN IMPACT INDICATOR FOR CONTAINERS Filed Dec. 28, 1949 Fig.2

Fig. 4

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Patented June 24, 1952 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE IMPACT INDICATOR FOR CONTAINERS John P. Kerrigan, Merchantville, N. J.

Application December 28, 1949, Serial No. 135,368

12 Claims.

The present invention relates to containers for shipping merchandise and more particularly to a shock or impact indicating or recording unit included as a component part of a container.

In the handling of merchandise for shipment in cartons, containers, crates, boxes or the like there is a sequence of handling operations in any one of which the container may be dropped or so improperly passed on from one handler to another as to cause damage to the contents. At the present time, in so far as applicant is advised, no means are provided to indicate at what point in the handling chain blame or responsibility resides for merchandise damage, and it is only when the container reaches the ultimate customer or jobber that damage in handling or shipping is discovered. In consequence, there is no way to trace back through the sequence of handling to locate just when the container was so mishandled as to cause damage, and thus definitely fix the blame or liability.

Some of the objects of the present invention are: to provide a novel accessory for a merchandise shipping container; to provide a visually observable unit as a part of a packaged container for indicating impact or shock to the container greater than a predetermined value as a means of ascertaining at What place in the sequence of handling operations the container was subjected to such a shock as to cause damage to the contents; to provide a unit as a part of a packaged container for recording such a shock to a packaged container as has damaged the contents and thus fix the responsibility where it definitely belongs; to provide a merchandise container having a window through which a shock indicator or recorder can be viewed during the transportation of the packaged container from the shipping place to the ultimate destination; and to provide other improvements as will hereinafter appear.

In the accompanying drawings Fig. 1 represents a vertical fragmentary section of a container equipped with a shock indicating unit embodying one form of the present invention; Fig. 2 represents a fragmentary side elevation showing a window as one means of observing the unit in a container; Fig. 3 represents a plan ofa shock indicating unit embodying a modified form of the invention; Fig. 4 represents a section on line 4-; of the unit of Fig. 3; showing the same arranged to be placed in a container; Fig. 5 represents a vertical longitudinal section of a shock indicating unit embodying another modification of the invention; Fig. 6 represents a section on line 6-6 of Fig. 5; Fig. '7 represents a vertical longitudinal section of a modified {form of unit for visibly recording shocks received by a container in which the unit is mounted; Fig 8 represents an end elevation of the unit of Fig. 7 showing the recording target as mounted for viewing through a hole or window in the container having the unit therein; and Fig. 9 represents a section on line 9-9 of Fig. 7.

Referring to Figs. 1 and 2 of the drawings, this form of the invention comprises a frame ll] arranged to be mounted within a container H in alinement with a window l2 provided at a convenient location in the container but here shown as in the top thereof. The frame In supports a ball [3, preferably confined by the walls of the frame H) but visible through the window [2. This ball i3 is formed as an envelope of relatively thin glass or other easily fractured frangible material, which ruptures or shatters with audible sound under an impact of predetermined amplitude, with consequent visual indication of such impact.

In order to subject the ball l3 to shocks or impacts received by the container in handling or transit, a loose weight M is incorporated in the ball I3 and normally rests by gravity upon'the lowermost portion of the inner ball wall. When so assembled the frangible ball remains intact until such time as the container receives such a shock as would cause damage to the contents of the container, at which time the ball (3 will be projected against the ball wall with sufiicient force to shatter the ball. Thereafter, the next recipient of the container looks through the window I2 and noting the absence of the ball immediately knows that damage has occurred during the preceding transit step of the container, whereupon the observer refuses to accept the container or reports the discovery.

Referring to Figs. 3 and 4 of the drawings, a modified form of the invention is shown, wherein the unit comprises a frame iormed of a base 15, and one or two upstanding posts is and i1 serve as the support for the impact indicating mechanism. In the present instance, this mechanism comprises a bifurcated spring l8 projecting in parallel spaced relation from a bridge piece 20, here shown as fixed to the inner face of the post l6 by suitable fastening means 2|. The two spring parts terminate in spaced relation to the post I! and are so biased as to grip an impact actuated ball-shaped weight 22 between them. Apertures 23 are formed in the respective spring parts, such apertures being in alinement to seat diametrically opposite side portions of the ball weight 22. The post I! may be found unnecessary because it is only provided as an additional anchoring means for the unit where the selected location in the container so requires.

For viewing the spring held ball weight 22, the unit can be attached inside of a container for alinement with a window provided either in the side or top of the container. When mounted to aline with a side window, the observer can note the displacement of the ball because the apertures 23 are both exposed, while if the unit is mounted below a window in the top of the unit, the observer can note the displacement of the ball because the spring parts are bowed together due to the absence of the ball.

Referring to Figs. 5 and 6 of the drawings, another modification of the invention is shown wherein a tube 24, preferably cylindrical, is mounted between two end posts 25 rising from a base 26. The tube 24 is formed of thin frangible material such as glass and encircles a spring Wire 21 fastened at one end to one of the posts 25 and terminating in a free end mounting an impact member 28, which is preferably formed with end sharp projections 33 to assist the member 28 in fracturing the tube 24. While the tube 24 is preferably of a frangible nature, it may be made of easily dented ductile material.

For viewing purposes, this unit is mounted on the inside of the container in such alinement with a provided window that the presence or absence of the tube can be immediately discovered by looking through the inspection window. If the tube has been fractured by the blow of the spring-supported impact member it will be observed at once, but on the other hand, if the tube is of ductile material a protruding dent in its surface will also be observed. In both constructions any observer along the line of transit can know where the damage occurred.

Referring to Figs. '7 and 8 of the drawings, a further modification of the invention is shown, wherein a frame made of a base 3i and two alined spaced apart upstanding posts 32 and 33 serve to respectively support the impact-responsive means and to mount the unit within a container.

For responding to shocks to the container, the impact-responsive means in this instance comprises a straight spring Wire 34 fixed at one end to the post 32 and having a free sharp end to puncture and be normally supported in a target 35 of paper or like easily punctured material. This target 35 forms a closure for the inner end of a bore 36 in the post 33, and in the operative position of the unit this bore 35 is alined with the inspection window of the container. Preferably the face of the target disposed towards the end of the wire 34 is covered with a piece of wire mesh 3? as a control and guide for the said wire end. It should be noted that the length of the wire 34 is such when horizontally disposed that its end will just pass through the center of the bore and thus indicate no shocks have been received. However, if the wire is bowed in any direction, its end will be withdrawn from the target and ride along the face of the wire mesh 3! until the bowed action is reversed, whereupon the mesh will cause the wire end to be guided through the target eccentric of its center to thereby not only indicate a shock but also to make a record thereof.

For the purpose of causing the wire 34 to respond as above described, an impact weight 38 is mounted thereon at a sensitive location between the wire ends and thus controls the deflection of the wire and its target-puncturing functions. By reference to Fig. 8 it will be seen that the normal set position of the unit will be indicated by the wire puncture at the center 0 of the target, where it will remain during shipment of the container unless the latter is subjected to a damaging shock. If and when such shock occurs, the responsive deflection of the weight 38 bows the wire 34 to withdraw its end from the target so that the return swing of the weight will re-straighten the wire 34 but with its end puncturing the target eccentric to the center 0. Illustratively, a minor shock may be shown at d on the target and a major shock at 6, but in any instance the eccentricity indicated is proportionate to the force of the impact.

In connection with the Figs. 7, 8, and 9, it will be observed that with a flexible wire 34, impacts having a component axially of the wire toward post 32 can cause weight 38 to move toward the post, bowing the wire sufhciently to withdraw the free end from the target to reset same. As the weight 38 responds to any resultant force transverse of the wire, it is practically universal in its response and adequate impact indication can therefore be secured from the single unit of Fig. '7. The same is true of the frangible device of Figs. 1 and 2. The indications from the device of Fig. 5 are from resultant forces effective on the weight 28 transverse of the wire and is therefore effective as a single unit for most purposes, as an impact axial of the wire would generally include a lateral component sufficient to cause contact of the weight 28 with the cylinder 24, whether the latter is frangible or ductile, for effecting an indication. With the device of Fig. 3, it will be seen that its primary response to impact is in a plane parallel with the legs of spring l8. It may be found desirable, although not essential, that a second unit be provided with the plane of legs of spring N3 of the first unit substantially normal to the plane of the legs of the second unit, so that an impact response will be indicated by one or the other. For general purposes it will usually be found, however, that the impact includes a component in a direction proper to actuate the indicator and therefore that a single unit may be associated with a single package.

While the invention is not limited to any specific dimension of the units, it is preferred to keep them relatively small, say, of approximately an overall dimension of three square inches. Also, in the foregoing reference is made to a window in the container, but this is used in a broad sense because the invention is not to be construed as limited to a window since any way of exposing the unit to observation is contemplated in its use.

It should be noted that where the term ball appears in the specification and claims it is used in a generic sense and includes any mechanical equivalent. Thus, the frangible ball l3 may comprise any shape of frangible envelope, and the ball 22 of Fig. 3 can be of any shape capable of temporary support by and between spring arms of sprin [3.

Other mechanical equivalents will occur to those skilled in the art for the other features of the invention, and such are to be construed as within the scope of the invention.

Having thus described my invention, I claim:

1. An impact indicating mechanism for indicating impacts of greater than a predetermined relatively minor amplitude on a container susceptible to impacts of varying amplitudes with which the mechanism is associated, comprising in combination a mass movable in space and rupturable visual means in relative juxtaposition thereto, under static conditions effecting a predetermined visual eifect indicative of the absence of incidence of impact of greater amplitude than a predetermined minor amplitude upon such container, said mass being disposed to maintain the said predetermined visual aspect of the visual means under transitory dynamic impact impulses of predeterminedly minor amplitude but movable under transitory dynamic impact impulses of relatively major amplitude greater than said minor amplitudes to effect rupture of the rupturable visual means to effect a change in the visual aspect thereof indicative of exposure to an impact impulse of said major amplitude.

2. An impact indicating mechanism as recited in claim 1, in which the rupturable visual means 1 is comprised of a frangible element.

3. An impact indicating mechanism comprising the combination of a container having a sight opening, a frangible ball, means mounting said ball in said container in alinement with said sight opening, and a weight loose in said ball to respond to a damaging impact on said container, whereby any such impact fractures said ball to indicate damage has occurred.

4. An impact indicating mechanism comprising the combination of a container, a frame arranged for mounting in said container, a frangible member carried by said frame, a weight means associated with said member and mounted to be displaced in response to a damaging impact on said container for breaking said frangible member, and means for observing the condition of said frangible member from the exterior of said container.

5. An impact indicating mechanism comprising the combination of a container having a window therein, a frame arranged for mounting in said container adjacent said window, a frangible member carried by said frame in juxtaposed relation to said window, and weight means associated with said member and mounted to be displaced in response to a damaging impact on said container for breaking said frangible member, whereby the condition of said member is observable through said window at all times.

6. An impact indicating mechanism comprising the combination of a container having a window therein, a weight, means to support said weight for movement caused by a damaging impact upon said container, said supporting means positioning said weight in register with said window, and a member mounted in the path of movement of said weight and formed of material yieldable under a blow of said weight to visibly indicatea change of its condition, whereby the condition of said member is observable through said window at all times.

7. An impact indicating mechanism comprising the combination of a container having a sight opening, a target of puncturable material mounted in register with said opening, and means including a weight movably responsive to a damaging impact on said container for puncturing said target to indicate the movement of said weight.

8. An impact indicating mechanism comprising the combination of a container having a sight opening, a target of puncturable material mounted in register with said opening, and means including a spring mounted weight movably responsive to a damaging impact on said container for puncturing said target to indicate the movement of said weight.

9. An impact indicating mechanism comprising the combination of a container having a sight opening, a frame mounted in said container, a target of puncturable material mounted in register with said opening, a straight-ended flexible wire fixed at one end to said frame and having the straight end passing slidably through said target, and a weight carried by said wire to vibrate under a damaging impact on said container and cause said wire to withdraw from said target and repuncture said target at a point spaced from the initial puncture, whereby damage to the container is indicated through said opening.

10. An impact indicating mechanism comprising the combination of a container having a sight opening, a target of puncturable material mounted in register with said opening, a flexible wire for puncturing said target, means anchoring one end of said wire to support said wire substantially normal to said target with its free end contacting said target, and a Weight on said wire movably responsive to a damaging impact on said container to initially bow said wire and secondarily produce an axial thrust to said free end to puncture said target to indicate said weight movement.

11. An impact indicating mechanism comprising the combination of a container having a sight opening, a target of puncturable material mounted in register with said opening, a mesh mat on the inner face of said target, a flexible wire for puncturing said target, means anchoring one end of said wire to support said wire substantially normal to said target with its free end contacting said target through said mat, and a weight on said wire movably responsive to a damaging impact on said container to bow said wire and produce an axial thrust to said free end to puncture said target to indicate said weight movement.

12. An impact indicating mechanism comprising in combination a container, a frangible envelope in the container which when shattered makes an audible noise, a weight in the container and supported relative to the envelope to maintain the envelope formation, said weight responding to impacts on the container to shatter the envelope to indicate the fact of the impact.

JOHN P. KERRIGAN.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 1,668,809 James May 8, 1928 1,710,594 Tapley Apr. 23, 1929 1,842,384 Blanchard Jan. 26, 1932 2,119,145 Zadig May 31, 1938 2,244,417 Bacon June 3, 1941 2,380,587 Fenton July 31, 1945 2,441,162 McPherson May 11, 1948

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Referenced by
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US2666409 *May 7, 1952Jan 19, 1954Kane Ernest MShock indicating device
US2667142 *Jul 8, 1952Jan 26, 1954Kane Ernest MShock indicating device
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CN103221307B *Nov 9, 2011Apr 27, 2016梅西耶-道提有限公司用于飞机起落架的机械位置指示器
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Classifications
U.S. Classification116/203, 73/11.1, 73/514.36, 220/1.5, 200/61.49, 73/492, 206/521, 73/12.1
International ClassificationB65D79/02, G01P15/06, G01P15/02, B65D79/00
Cooperative ClassificationB65D79/02, G01P15/06
European ClassificationG01P15/06, B65D79/02