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Publication numberUS2601513 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 24, 1952
Filing dateDec 29, 1948
Priority dateDec 29, 1948
Publication numberUS 2601513 A, US 2601513A, US-A-2601513, US2601513 A, US2601513A
InventorsGladstone Sidney A
Original AssigneeGladstone Sidney A
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Surgical tissue collector device
US 2601513 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 1952 s. A. GLADSTONE SURGICAL TISSUE COLLECTOR DEVICE Filed Dec. 29, 1948 INVEN TOR. J/Q/VEY ,4 62 .40570/1 5 ATm/P/VEVS Patented June 24, 1952 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE SURGICAL TISSUE COLLECTOR DEVICE Sidney A. Gladstone, Paterson, N. J.

Application December 29, 1948, Serial No. 67,860

4 Claims.

1 This invention is a surgical tissue collector device particularly adapted for collecting tissue from a tumor.

A novel technique for obtaining tumor tissue specimens is disclosed and claimed in a copending application bearing Serial No. 53,131 and filed by the present inventor on October 6, 1948,.

now Patent No. 2,591,927. Among other things this technique includes rubbing a sponge over the tumor to collect tissue from it. A primary object of the present invention is to provide an instrument particularly adapted for manipulating the sponge and which is better adapted than prior art devices for use in connection with the technique of the invention of the copending application. However, in attaining this object an instrument has been developed which may be useful for other purposes.

The present invention involves a surgical tissue collector device comprising forceps having cooperating short and long jaws adapted to grip the sponge therebetween with its major sponge portion free on one side and backed-up on its opposite side by the long jaw. This permits greater rubbing pressure to be applied to the sponge. The outer side of the short jaw is roughened and adapted to loosen tissue when rubbed thereover whereby to provide loosened tissue for absorption by the sponge. In a modified form of the device the jaw and handle portions are relatively angular which is an arrangement that has been found advantageous under certain conditions. In a further modification the long jaw is made tubular and provided with inlets to its interior with these inlets arranged on its sponge-engaging side. This tubular jaw is provided with an outlet to which suction may be applied whereby to enhance the liquid absorption ability of the sponge.

Such a device and modifications are illustrated by the accompanying drawings in which:

Fig. 1 is a perspective of the device;

Fig. 2 is an enlarged top view of the jaws with a broken line outlining the portion of a sponge gripped thereby;

Fig. 3 is a cross section of the short jaw taken from the line 3-3 in Fig. 2, this Fig. 3 being enlarged relative Fig. 2;

Fig. 4 is a ide view of the jaws as they appear when in angular relation with the handle portions and thus represents a modification;

Fig. 5 is a perspective showing the further modification involving the suction feature, and

Fig. 6 shows the long jaw of the device of Fig. 5 on an enlarged scale to illustrate its construction in detail.

Referring to Figs. 1 through 3, the device may generally follow the construction of surgical forceps by comprising interpivoted handles I and 2 having finger loops 3 and ratchet locking parts 4. The handles I and 2 are interpivoted at 5 and extend beyond to the jaws. Thus far the device is similar to a surgical forceps.

Now diverging from the prior art the device has a short jaw 6 and a long jaw 1, the latter being in the form of a loop arranged in a plane parallel to the pivoting axis of the handles l and 2 and, therefore, transverse to its swinging direction. These short and long jaws are adapted to grip a sponge therebetween with its major sponge portion free on one side and backed-up on its opposite side by the longjaw. The manner of holding the sponge is illustrated by Fig. 4 showing the modified angular relation between the jaws and handles but operating in the fashion of the device illustrated by Figs. 1 through 3. Preferably the sponge engaging face of the long jaw 1 is roughened as shown at 8 so as to restrain relative movement between the sponge and the long jaw. The inner end of the sponge is tightly nipped or gripped between the two jaws. The shortness of the short jaw leaves a large amount of the sponge exposed. Therefore it is easy to use the device to rub the sponge on the tumor so as to realize the full effectiveness of the sponge. The long jaw backs-up the sponge so heavy rubbing force may be used if desired.

The roughness on the outer face of the short jaw 6 preferably comprises transverse ridges 9 adjacent its outer end and longitudinally extending ridges l0 leading to the transverse ridges 9. The ridges 9 are preferably interrupted transversely of the jaw so that they are in the form of sections and preferably a multiplicity of rows of the ridges 9 are provided. The longitudinally extending ridges III are interrupted longitudinally of the jaw and are also used in multiple rows. The jaw 6 is shown as having a triangular shape so as to match the throat of the loop forming the long jaw 1. The longitudinally extending grooves ID are arranged in a fanned pattern so as to take full advantage of the triangular shape.

In Fig. 4 the handles l and 2 are shown bent at an angle relative the jaws B and 1. This has an advantage where it is necessary to use the device through surgical devices making manipulation of the sponge difficult. The handles and 2 may be operated effectively at an angle relative the sponge gripped by the jaws.

In Fig. 6 the handle 2a and the long jaw 1a, are made tubular, and the face of the jaw 1a that engages the sponge is formed with a series of inlets l l. The finger loop of the handle 2a may be provided with an outlet [2. The other parts may be made as already described. The constructions of the handle 2a and jaw Ta are such that there is a continuous passage between the outlet l2 and the jaw la. This passage is free from openings excepting for the inlets ll. Therefore suction applied to the outlet l2 tends to remove excess fluid with which the sponge may become absorbed and hence enhances the capacity of the sponge to collect tissue.

In using the device the sponge is clamped between the short and long jaws in the manner indicated by Figs. 2 and 4, the lock l being used to maintain the jaws closed. The device maybe drawn toward the user with the. longitudinal ridges l9 lacerating the tumor tissue and the transverse ribs 9 tending to roll the tissue free. When the sponge reaches the tissue there is considerable loose material thus provided for it to pick up. The sponge collects the tissue on its surface while absorbing any liquids, the surface of the sponge functioning somewhat as a screen to revent, the tissue from penetrating too deeply. Whenthe spnge becomes filled with liquid it loses its absorption properties. If the modification shown by Figs. 5 and 6 is in use, suction may then be. applied to remove the liquids with which the sponge may have become saturated, thus permitting the penetration of; morev liquid into the sponge and; consequent collection of more tissue on the sponge surface. Suction may be used continuously if desired.

The roughened surface 6, on the face of the long jaw tends, to prevent the sponge from moving relative to the long jaw which is backing it up. Considerable pressure may be applied to the sponge toirub it on a tumor because, the long jaw '1 provides its backside, with rigid support.

I claim:

1., A. surgical tissue. collector device comprising forceps having cooperating shortand long jaws adaptedto grip a sponge therebetween withits major sponge portion. free on one side and backed-up on its opposite, side by the long jaw, the outer side of the short jaw having a plurality of projections thereon adapted to loosen tissue when rubbed thereover.

2. A surgical tissue collector device comprising forceps having cooperating short and long jaws adapted to grip an end of a sponge to leave its major portion free on one side and backed-up on its opposite side by the long jaw, the outer side of the short jaw having transverse ridges adjacent its outer end and longitudinally extending ridges leading to said transverse ridges, said long jaw being tubular and having inlets to its interior arranged on its sponge-engaging side and having a tubular handle communicating with its interior and provided with an outlet for connection with a vacuum.

3. A surgical tissue collector device comprising forceps having cooperating short and long jaws adapted to grip an end of a sponge to leave its major portion free on one side and backed-up on its opposite side by the long jaw, the outer side of the short jaw having transverse ridges adjacent its outer end and longitudinally extending ridges leading to said transverse ridges.

4. A surgical tissue collector device comprising forceps having cooperating short and long jaws adapted to grip an end of a sponge to leave its major portion free on one side and backed-up on its opposite side by the long jaw, the long jaw being, tubular and having inlets to its interior arranged on its sponge-engaging side and having an outlet to which suction may be applied.

SIDNEY A. GLADSTONE.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2887111 *Oct 3, 1957May 19, 1959Leyro Diaz Ricardo MSurgical forceps
US3512518 *Nov 14, 1966May 19, 1970Bidwell Robert EBrush device for collecting cellular or bacterial specimens
US3520300 *Mar 15, 1967Jul 14, 1970Amp IncSurgical sponge and suction device
US3741602 *Apr 1, 1971Jun 26, 1973Ploeckelmann STweezers
US3807406 *Jun 8, 1973Apr 30, 1974Bio Medicus IncInstrument surgical with suction device
US3916909 *Jun 24, 1974Nov 4, 1975Bio Medicus IncSuction surgical instrument of the forceps type
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US4049002 *May 3, 1976Sep 20, 1977Bio-Medicus, Inc.Fluid conveying surgical instrument
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US4522206 *Jan 26, 1983Jun 11, 1985Dyonics, Inc.For cutting a range of body tissue
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US5217007 *Apr 26, 1991Jun 8, 1993Cook IncorporatedSpeculum for forming an ostomy in a trachea
US5342375 *Jan 27, 1993Aug 30, 1994Lemole Gerald MNeedle gripping apparatus
US5476479 *Jan 11, 1995Dec 19, 1995United States Surgical CorporationHandle for endoscopic surgical instruments and jaw structure
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US5509922 *Nov 1, 1994Apr 23, 1996United States Surgical CorporationEndoscopic surgical instrument
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US5858781 *May 11, 1995Jan 12, 1999Matyas; John R.Collecting loose glomeruli from renal biopsies by washing biospy core or biopsy instruments, filtering solution through porous membrane, collecting glomeruli on membrane; for diagnosis
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US5925056 *May 8, 1997Jul 20, 1999Surgical Dynamics, Inc.For removing matter from a surgical site during a surgical procedure
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US7749173 *Oct 26, 2006Jul 6, 2010Daniel LarkinApparatus for simultaneously collecting exocervical and endocervical samples
US8251918Jun 14, 2010Aug 28, 2012Daniel LarkinMethod and apparatus for simultaneously collecting exocervical and endocervical samples
US8439847 *Jun 14, 2010May 14, 2013Daniel LarkinMethod and apparatus for simultaneously collecting exocervical and endocervical samples
US20100249649 *Jun 14, 2010Sep 30, 2010Daniel LarkinMethod and apparatus for simultaneously collecting exocervical and endocervical samples
Classifications
U.S. Classification600/572, 606/207
International ClassificationA61B17/28
Cooperative ClassificationA61B17/2812
European ClassificationA61B17/28D