Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS2601771 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 1, 1952
Filing dateMar 28, 1951
Priority dateMar 28, 1951
Publication numberUS 2601771 A, US 2601771A, US-A-2601771, US2601771 A, US2601771A
InventorsCameron John A
Original AssigneeCleanser Products Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Cleaning aid
US 2601771 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

y 1952 J. A. CAMERON CLEANING AID 2 SHEETS-SHEET 1 Filed March 28, 1951 /o 20 /6a 20 m 4 )7 /8 17 I8 7M6 /,d a

July 1, 1952 J. A. CAMERON CLEANING AID 2 SHEETSSHEET 2 Filed March 28, 1951 Awe/17%)!" (/0/71? 0. Came 0/7 flfiorney Patented my 1, 1952 .J'ohn .-A. .Cameron, Evanston, Ill.,. assignor to .Cleanse1-1- Products, 1110., Chicago, 111., a corporationof Illinois Applicationll/Iarch28, 1951, Serial 110,218,008

' There has been forazgreatmany years an increasingly persistent demandJforaa scouring type cleaner, or cleaning pad, which would ;be efficientrand durable, yetsanitaryssafe, and pleasant to use,:and at the same time sufficiently inexpensive as to be economically \feasible afor commercialv manufacture and sale. 1 1 1 There have been many widely different types of such :articles heretofore proposed, 1 and the 'art is replete with all manner ofpads, cloths, sponges, brushes, etc., designed for ithi's speclflcpurpo'se. Some of these are sold quite extensively. Nevertheless, it is an incontrovertible fact that, notwithstanding the many 1 and various cleaning devices heretofore proposed, there has not as yet been one which succeeds, in all respects, in filling the long recognized need. 1 1 1 '-In view of this, it maybe inpoint to enumerate some of the many qualities that an ideal cleaning'aid shouldpossess, 'so that these qualities may be kept in mindjas the present disclosure 'proceeds. 1 1

1. E 7icz'ency.- It isof course a first essential or this type of cleaning aid that 'it-becapable of quickly and effectively 1 removing all kinds of dirt from'suriaces on which it isdesigned to be used.

For example, forcleaning cooking utensils, it should be resilient yet sufficiently compressible 2. Easezof operation .-.It is not enoughithat the cleaning be done effectively. It must also be done withoutoverly great efiort on the part ofthe user. It follows that,to be entirely acceptable,- any-cleaning aid should beoffla type which is quickand easy to use, convenient to hold in the hand, andxeasy to keep clean. 1 1 1 1 1 3. Gentleness.-Notwithstanding the need for eflicientcleansing, it is also essential that, to be entirely. satisfactoryy any article for this p11r pose should beoi. such a naturejthat it does not gougascore, nor scratchthesurfaces on which it maybe used. It iswell known, for example, that many seemingly eificient scouring pads invariably produce microscopic scratches over theentire surface on which they arerused,1particularly when used on some ofthe softer metal vessels such as by accumula- 4Claims. (01. 66-170) aluminum ware. The existence of these scratches not only providesa breeding place for bacteria and various microorganisms, but also sufficiently destroys the smoothnessof the surfaceof the utensil so that :residues of foods cooked therein will accumulate in the scratches, causing the utensil to display an unreasonable tendency to burn and. further: discolor. Also, 'as these scratches take'up foodacids, they become gradually larger, and the condition becomes progressively worse. It is therefore obvious that any proposed cleaning device should not tend to cut, scratch, orin anyway injure the surfaces on whichitis designed .to be used. 1 1

Safety-It isobviously desirable to provide a cleaning aid which may be used without rfear of injury to the user. This involves several aspects. For one thing, it should be of such a naturethat it will not cut or scratch the hands of the user, nor exhibit any'tendency to cause splinters. 1 At the sametime, it should be of such'natur'e that it is not toxic and does not constitute afire hazard.

Moreover, it should be free from any perceptible chemical reaction with foods, soaps, solvents, or

detergents, as well as with the various bleaches and cleaning compounds presently available.

5. Sanitation-Ho be ideal in thisrespechthe articlexrnustbe so designed'that itdoes not tend to harbor disease breeding bacteria itself, and

does not accumulate food residue or other forkind have as high adegree of inherent durability as is possible. The durability of steel wool may be entirely destroyed by rusting, or copper by corrosion, even withoutextensive use. The usefulness of pads of copper mesh, etc., maybe greatly impaired by compressing the pad suificiently to flatten its meshes and permanently crimp them into a relatively solid, unyielding mass. It islrnportant to avoid these diificulties insofar as pos-" sible by the provision of a cleaning aid which is non-matting and capable of withstanding the, greatest possible amount of wear, yet not subject.

to cleterioration'when idle.

7. Appearance.Notwithstanding the more'im It should therefore be'- capablao'f 6'. DurabiZity.-To be commercially'acceptable in-the trade, it is desirable that any device of this portant qualities listed above, it is nevertheless essential that any device for this purpose be clean looking and attractive to the eye; not only at the time of purchase, but even after a long extended period of use. Preferably, it should be composed entirely of bright, light-colored, colorful, or polished material, of one or more colors.

While the above are probably the most important characteristics of an ideal cleaning device, the list is not intended to be exhaustive, since the article should be in all respects entirely pleasant to use as well as being effective. It should be free of objectionable odors, for example, and should also be free of any tendency to deteriorate prior to use.

In reviewing the foregoing points of desirability which an ideal cleaning device should have, it is important to note that they are all entirely obshown in Figure 3, or by extruding the filament vious and have in every case been individually recognized for a great many years. Notwithstanding this, the prior art fails to show an article iniwhich all of these desirable qualities are simultaneously achieved. On the contrary, it appears that these qualities have heretofore shown themselves to be to a large extent mutually antagonistic, with the result that prior art devices which have shown themselves to possess the requisite degree ofcleansing efliciency are not gentle, and in many cases are uncomfortable, unpleasant or unsafe to use, unsanitary, and at the same time lacking in the requisite durability that an ideal cleaning device should have. Similarly, it has'been noted that those prior art articles which possess some of the desirable characteristics of safety, durability and sanitation are unsatisfactory from the standpoint of cleansing efiiciency.

It is therefore the general aim .of the present invention to reconcile the heretofore conflicting requirements of articles of this type and to pro-.

vide a single cleaning aid having substantially all of the requisite'qualities desired.

A still further object of the invention is to provide-such an article having inherent characteristics'such'that' its-field of usefulness is not limited to the cleaning of ordinary pots and pans, but extends to the cleaning of softer materials,. so that'the device is adapted'for efiicient cleaning of porcelain enamel, silverware, and other relatively delicate finishes such as fine chinaware, for example. Obviously the accomplishment of this object requires the provision of a cleaning aid which is extremely gentle, yet nevertheless effective.

So'far as applicant is aware, the present invention is the'first to produce an article having the requisite physical qualities to accomplish all of the objectives listed above. In this invention, the applicant has taken a direct departure from the commonly accepted teachings of the art and has consequently developed a device having unique structural features, and of material never before contemplated for the purpose, which has nevertheless shown itself to be far superior to any of the materials previously used.

A preferred embodiment of the invention is illustrated in the drawings of this specification, whereinz Figure 1 is a perspective view of a cleaning device as contemplated by this disclosure;

Figure 2 is a greatly enlarged perspective view of a section of relatively fine filament of conventional cylindrical shape. The device shown in Figure 1 is made entirely from this type of material, preferably after the filament has been flatin fiat condition;

Figure 4a is an alternative form of flat ribbonlike filament, which also may be formed by rolling or by-extruding in final shape;

Figure 5-is a perspective view of a knitted tube, sleeve or stocking which is thereafter formed into a completed cleaning aid as shown in Figure 1;

Figure 6 is a greatly enlarged detail sectional view through the knitted fabric of the sleeve, the view beingtaken substantially on the plane of the line 6-6 of Figure 5;

Figure .7 is a greatly enlarged outside elevational viewof a portion of the knitted sleeveof Figures 5 and 6, showing the mesh of the knit fabric as it appears on the outer side of the sleeve;

Figure 8 is a perspective view of the sleeve shown in Figure 5 after the sleeve has been turned inside out and portions thereof contracted prior to bunching of the sleeve;

Figure 9 is a greatlyenlarged detail sectional view through the knitted fabric of the sleeve when turned inside out,the view being taken substantially on the plane of the line 9-9 of Figure 8;

Figure 10 is a greatlyenlargedoutside view of the surface of the sleeve fabric after it has been turned inside out; and

Figure 11 is a greatly enlarged edge view of one of the individual strands of the material of which the knitted sleeve is formed.

The invention disclosed herein, as commercially manufactured, consists of ribbon-like vinylidene chloride strands, knitted into a generally tubular or sleeve-like shape and thereafter turned inside out and bunched together sothat it may be conveniently held in the palm of the hand while in use. The general shape of the completed device is indicated at H! in Figure 1.

The individual strands of the knitted sleeve are extruded filaments of a plastic composition comprising a mixture of copolymers of vinylidene chloride and vinyl chloride having a softening point or liquefying point of above 212 F. in hot water when the cleaning'aid is being'used for its intended purpose. This material has been found to afford excellent results, and whileapplicant is not at present aware of other materials entirely suitable for the purpose, it is contemplated that other material having the same characteristics andcapacities may be used. The material, in its original state, comprises a strand H of circular cross section which may be from,

.015 to .020 in diameter. In present production, this cylindrical filament is first reworked into'a relatively fiat ribbon-like strip l2. The term ribbon-like is used to distinguish this filament from round or cylindrical filaments having no scraping edges thereon, and is intended to define a filament having a width substantially greater than its thickness. Such elliptical cross section as illustrated in Figure 4a, or of the somewhat Figure 4. The rectangular shaped filament may a filament may be of rectangular shape shown in be convenientlymanufacturedby passing a cyline drical filament: between a pair of rollers lc3 rand M, as shown in Figure' 3. A filament of the elliptical shape of Figure 4a is most conveniently extruded. r

The ribbon-like strip l2 is knitted into .a cir-, cularrsleeve or stockinglfiwFigure:5) whichis preferablyabout 5 in diameter and may be from 12 to 25" in length. The knitting operation may be conventional; and is done on a machine known inthe trade as a-seamlessribber; The knittedtfabric ofrwhich the "sleeve 15 is composed consists of a multiplicity of lengthso'f ribbon, each extending circumferentially around the sleeveand beingof serpentine shapethroughout their lengths, as illustrated for example by theilengths ofribbon Iii, 16a and 16b of Figure 7. The appearanceof the fabric in cross section is best seen inFiguredinwhich it will be apparent that the loops of each of these ribbons are so laid by the knitting machine that the relatively smooth, convex surfaces ['8 areon the exterior of the sleeve,while the end loop portions 19 of each of the lengths of ribbon aredisposecl edgewise withrespect to the general plane of the fabric, and mean its interior surface.

. It'is desirable for purposes of the present in vention to position the fabric in such a manner that the edges 20 or theend loopportions of each length of ribbon are exposed where they may directly contact the work when the device is used. Tothis end,'the entire sleeve is turned inside out, and theoutside surface of the mesh thereof presents the appearance'illustrated in FiguresQ and 10. 'Ilie fabric is then bunched together so that it may be conveniently/held in the palm of the hand while in use. The bunching operation may be conveniently carried out by tying the sleeve at points 2i and 22, spaced apart from each other by a central portion 23 and having end portions 25 and 25. If desired, the sleeve may be tied bythe simple expedient of pulling one strand of the filamenttherefrom to form a loop such as illustrated at 26 oryi'i. This will of course draw the flexible fabric of the sleeve inwardly and form restricted openings 28 and 2% through which the iree end portions, 24 and 25 may be turned inwardly to bunch the device in the generally circular shape illustrated in Figure 1.

A cleaning device produced as above combines the desirable qualities of eiliciency, durability, safety, and sanitation to a greater degree than any other known to the present applicant, and is at the same time easy and pleasant to use, attractive in appearance, and relatively inexpensive. The mesh contact surface of the sleeve employed herein presents the strands of flat, relatively hard, ribbon-like plastic to the Working surface with the edges of the end loops thereof in a position such that the strands or filaments are most effective in their cleaning operation, and thus afford an aggressive cleaning action, which is both quick and easy. The vinylidene chloride ribbon has been found to be a material having sufficient strength, rigidity and hardness to effectively dislodge food particles or other foreign matter from surfaces which the fabric engages, yet to do so without scratching even relatively soft surfaces such as silverware and fine china. This extends the usefulness of a cleaner of this type to many additional uses, as well as to use on ordinary kitchen utensils.

Notwithstanding this, the article will not scratch the hands of the user, cut the skin, nor

are water-repellent throughout.

cause splinters. It isentirely non-poisonous and does-not constitute-a fire hazard. It has no perceptible chemical reaction with soaps, solvents or detergents and isimpervious'to the various bleacheswand' cleaning compounds presently in common use. The entiresurface of each of the strands of the fabric isentirelysmooth and highly polished, sothat it does notpossess microscopic crevices which may harbor germs; It may besterilized in boiling water without damage. Water does not easily adhere tothe relatively hard, dense material', and "the construction of the-bunchedwsleeveis such that itmay easily and quickly be flushed to remove any foreign material therefrom. This may bedo'ne'by merely holding the device undera water faucet and manipulating it=by hand :for a few moments as the water flows through it. As thisis done, the interlocked loops of the adjoining" strands of the filament moveina wide sliding action withrespect to each otherand rub against one another in such; a mannor as to dislodge any foreign substances in the interstices between the strands and permit'any such foreign material'to 'be carried away by the water. The water adhering thereto may then be dislodged merely by shaking or tapping. Thus, it does not tend to accumulate foreign matter, 1101' developunpleasant odors. It is unafiected by soaps or 'other cleansing agents, and its surfaces tirely non-corrosive in nature, there can be no rustingor pitting of the material, with the'result that the advantages of sanitation existing when the deviceisnew will'be retained-to a large extent throughoutitsuseful life i i i i The present device also has anunusually high degree of inherent durability. The wearing sur faces'of the fabric are presented to the material in edgewise position where they are capable of withstanding the greatest amount of wear. The vinylidene'chloride material of iWhiCh itis made has an inherenttstiffness, yet is sufficiently resilicut so that whenthe device is in use the individual strands thereof do not take apermanent setasaresult of temporary flexing, evenwhen flexed to-anextremedegree. Consequently, the

device is hand-compressible to the extent that it will conform to the contours of surfaces on which it,is used. yet is self-restoringto approximately its original shape and isentirely non-matting.

to i the; hand, and has sufiicient inherent spring? ness or resiliency so thatit is not apt to flatten unduly.

.The entire device is composed of bright, lightcolored, non-corrosive material which is clean looking and attractive to the eye. This condition exists not only at the time of purchase, but even after a long extended period of use. This is an object never accomplished by conventional knitted metal items, which have a decided tendency to blacken, rust or otherwise corrode.

In conclusion, it appears that the present invention succeeds in reconciling most of the heretofore conflicting requirements of cleaning devices of this type, and in so doing successfully provides a single article having all of the requisite qualities to a high degree. It is efiicient, fast,

and easy to use, yet its field of usefulness is not limited to the cleaning of ordinary pots and pans, but extends to the cleaning of softer materials, so that the article is adapted for eflicient cleaning of porcelain enamel, fine chinaware, silverware, and other relatively delicate finishes. With all of the above, it is an item of unique Since it is en-= design and of material never before contemplated for the purpose, the combination of. which has shown itself to be far superior to any known types of cleaning devices previously used.

Having thus described my invention, what I claim as new and desire to secure by United States Letters Patent is:

l. A hand-compressible, self-restoring, nonmatting cleaning aid comprising a tubular fabric sleeve consisting of spaced but slidably connected strands of plastic having a softening point of not less than 212 F., said strands having a generally serpentine shape affording relatively stiff spring loops of substantialy equal length and width, with alternate semicircular curved end portions of the spring loops of adjoining strands loosely interlocked with one another to afford relatively Wide sliding action of interlocked loops against one another to effect a self-cleansing action of the pad by dislodging foreign substances in the, interstices between the individual spring loops of the strands therein to facilitate flushing said substances from said pad and to prevent matting, said sleeve having retaining ties spaced from each other, with the ends of the sleeve bunched between the ties thereof, and within the central portion of the sleeve.

2. A hand-compressible, self-restoring, nonmatting cleaning aid comprising an open mesh pad consisting of spaced but slidably connected ribbon-like strands of plastic, said strands having a generally serpentine shape affording relatively stiff spring loops of substantially equal length and width with alternate semicircular curved end portions of the spring loops of adjoining strands loosely interlocked with one another, to afford relatively wide sliding action of interlocked loops against one another to effect a self-cleansing action of the pad by dislodging foreign substances in the interstices between the individual spring loops of the strands therein to facilitate fiushingsaid substances from said pad and to prevent matting; the end portions of the spring loops of said strands being disposed in edgewise position with respect to the outer surface of the pad, whereby the edges of said strands may bear directly against surfaces to which the pad is applied. I

3. A hand-compressible, self-restoring, nonmatting cleaning aid comprising an open mesh pad consisting of spaced but slidably connected ribbon-like strands, each comprising a mixture of copolymers of vinylidene chloride and vinyl chloride, said strands having a generally serpentine shape affording relatively stiff spring loops of substantially equal length and width, with alternate semicircular curved end portions of the spring loops of adjoining strands loosely interlocked with one another to afford relatively wide sliding action of interlocked loops against one another to effect a self-cleansing action of the pad by dislodging foreign substances in the interstices between the individual spring loops of the strands to facilitate flushing said substances from said pads and to prevent matting; the end portions of the spring loops of said strands being disposed in edgewise position with respect to the outer surface of the pad, whereby the edges of said strands may bear directly against surfaces to which the pad is applied.

4. A hand-compressible, self-restoring, nonmattin cleaning aid comprising an open mesh pad consisting of spaced but slidably connected ribbon-like strands, each comprising a mixture of copolymers of vinylidene chloride and vinyl chloride, said strands having a cross sectional area substantially equal to the area of a circle having a diameter of .015 to .020 inch and having a generally serpentine shape affording relatively stiff spring loops of substantially equal length and width, with alternate semicircular curved end portions of the spring loops of adjoining strands loosely interlocked with one another to afford relatively wide sliding action of interlocked loops against one another to effect a self-cleansing action of the pad by dislodging foreign substances in the interstices between the individual spring loops of the stands to facilitate flushing said substances from said pads and to prevent matting; the end portions of the spring loops of said strands being disposed in edgewise position with respect to the outer surface of the pad, whereby the edges of said strands may bear directly against surface to which the pad is applied.

JOHN A. CAMERON.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 2,152,697 Kingman Apr. 4, 1939 2,233,442 Wiley Mar. 4, 1941 2,332,485 Hanson Oct. 19, 1943 2,350,357 Kelman June 6, 1944 2,353,090 Shelmire et a1 July 4, 1944 2,354,435 Stedman July 25, 1944 2,375,585 Rimer May 8, 1945 2,434,533 Wurzburger Jan. 13, 1948 2,474,375 Shearer et al June 28, 1949

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2152697 *Oct 22, 1936Apr 4, 1939Metal Textile CorpScouring and cleaning implement
US2233442 *May 31, 1938Mar 4, 1941Dow Chemical CoPolymeric vinylidene chloride article
US2332485 *Sep 2, 1941Oct 19, 1943Dow Chemical CoVinylidene chloride fibers
US2350357 *Apr 3, 1941Jun 6, 1944Kelman David JScouring device and method for making the same
US2353090 *Jul 16, 1942Jul 4, 1944Scott & Williams IncKnit fabric and method of making the same
US2354435 *Aug 20, 1941Jul 25, 1944Firestone Tire & Rubber CoPlastic fabric
US2375585 *May 14, 1943May 8, 1945James H Rhodes & CompanyPlastic abrasive pad
US2434533 *May 24, 1945Jan 13, 1948Paul D WurzburgerImitation filaments, ropes, yarns, and the like
US2474375 *Apr 5, 1945Jun 28, 1949American Viscose CorpShaped fabricated article
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2743511 *Nov 5, 1952May 1, 1956Nat Plastic Products CompanyScouring pad and filament
US2848737 *Jul 18, 1952Aug 26, 1958Firestone Tire & Rubber CoExtrusion die
US2877483 *Dec 6, 1957Mar 17, 1959Alvistur OscarTooth brush
US2891270 *Oct 25, 1955Jun 23, 1959Adolph ReiterAbrasive wet mop
US2910710 *Jul 5, 1956Nov 3, 1959Corrington Helen KPlastic section dish cloth
US2919534 *Nov 2, 1955Jan 5, 1960Deering Milliken Res CorpImproved textile materials and methods and apparatus for preparing the same
US2940100 *Jul 14, 1958Jun 14, 1960Roy GrossmeyerComposite scouring and wiping device
US2942442 *Nov 26, 1957Jun 28, 1960Egbert Michael-LohsProtective working glove
US2948911 *Jun 5, 1956Aug 16, 1960Steiner Max SScouring pad
US3144671 *Apr 4, 1958Aug 18, 1964Dow Chemical CoDust cloth
US3146479 *Apr 30, 1962Sep 1, 1964Annette StokerOrnamental combined nylon net and sponge device for cleaning surfaces
US3181233 *Jun 6, 1961May 4, 1965Seamless Covers IncManufacture of paint rollers
US3252176 *Feb 4, 1960May 24, 1966Dow Chemical CoDetergent pad
US3345668 *Apr 16, 1965Oct 10, 1967Gen Aniline & Film CorpAbrasive article
US3496715 *Feb 23, 1968Feb 24, 1970Fitton JosephFilament and method of forming same
US3575019 *Feb 10, 1969Apr 13, 1971North American RockwellSeamless stocking and method of making same
US3714801 *Nov 29, 1968Feb 6, 1973North American RockwellStocking and method of making same
US3800559 *Apr 17, 1969Apr 2, 1974Texpatent Gmbh SarlMethod and apparatus for closing the toe of stockings or stocking tights
US3916645 *Oct 26, 1973Nov 4, 1975Hart David DDevice for repairing snagged knitwear fabrics
US4017949 *Feb 27, 1975Apr 19, 1977Acs Industries, Inc.Method of making a scouring pad or the like
US4040139 *Jun 25, 1975Aug 9, 1977Acs Industries, Inc.Scouring pad or the like
US4044574 *Oct 3, 1968Aug 30, 1977Billi, S.P.A.Method of closing the toe opening of a knit stocking or the like
US4052238 *Apr 2, 1976Oct 4, 1977Acs Industries, Inc.Method of making a scouring pad or the like
US4280342 *Feb 21, 1979Jul 28, 1981Ab AiserProtective pad or garment for the human body or parts thereof
US4403699 *Feb 2, 1978Sep 13, 1983Hansen Robert SHolding device for pencils and the like
US4494660 *Sep 13, 1983Jan 22, 1985Hansen Robert SHolding device for pencils and the like
US5465452 *Mar 31, 1994Nov 14, 1995The Procter & Gamble CompanyImplement for personal cleansing made from extruded plastic scrim
US5491864 *Nov 14, 1994Feb 20, 1996The Procter & Gamble CompanyImplement for personal cleansing and method of construction
US5530985 *Nov 13, 1995Jul 2, 1996Tsai; Chin-TienWire brush
US5594970 *Jan 31, 1995Jan 21, 1997The Procter & Gamble CompanyPersonal cleansing implement using knitted tubing
US5667612 *Jul 26, 1996Sep 16, 1997The Procter & Gamble CompanyPersonal cleansing implement using knitted tubing and method of construction
US5715561 *Apr 12, 1996Feb 10, 1998The Procter & Gamble CompanyPersonal cleansing implement made of stretched scrim providing softness benefit
US5863844 *Jun 27, 1996Jan 26, 1999The Procter & Gamble CompanyWashing implement comprising an improved open cell mesh
US6112363 *Jun 2, 1999Sep 5, 2000Chen; Ching-ChenBath belt
US6146745 *Jun 27, 1996Nov 14, 2000The Procter & Gamble CompanyOpen cell mesh and method for characterizing a mesh
US6156418 *Aug 8, 1996Dec 5, 2000The Procter & Gamble CompanyWashing implement comprising an improved open cell mesh
US6165603 *Aug 8, 1996Dec 26, 2000Procter & Gamble CompanyWashing implement comprising an improved open cell mesh
US6349443Aug 9, 2000Feb 26, 2002Playtex Products, Inc.Bottle/nipple cleaning device
US7124465Sep 15, 2000Oct 24, 2006Kaminstein Imports, Inc.Multi-layered hanging cleaning sponge
US9227301 *Aug 1, 2011Jan 5, 2016Miw Associates, LlcScraper assembly
US20080289129 *Nov 30, 2006Nov 27, 2008Masako KizukaWiping Material
US20120028551 *Feb 2, 2012Miw Associates, LlcScraper assembly
Classifications
U.S. Classification66/170, 428/397, 15/229.11, 57/248, 66/202
International ClassificationA47L13/02, A47L13/06
Cooperative ClassificationA47L13/06
European ClassificationA47L13/06