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Publication numberUS2602232 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 8, 1952
Filing dateNov 21, 1946
Priority dateNov 21, 1946
Publication numberUS 2602232 A, US 2602232A, US-A-2602232, US2602232 A, US2602232A
InventorsWilliam Keast
Original AssigneeWilliam Keast
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Apparatus for applying designs to wall structures
US 2602232 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

July 8, 1952 w, KEAS 2,602,232

APPARATUS FOR APPLYING DESIGNS l0 WALL STRUCTURES Filed Nov. 21, 1946 2 SHEETSSHEET 1 INVEN TOR. 2 baud/W 144E657.-

BY WWMW w. KEAST 2,692,232

APPARATUS FOR APPLYING DESIGNS TO WALL STRUCTURES July 8, 1952 Fil ed Nov. 21, 1946 2 SHEETS-SHEET 2 y "it 1 7 I N V EN TOR" M; 1. 09M K563 BY W flW /97' 70/9/1455 Patented July 8, 1952 OFFICE APPARATUS FOR APPLYING DESIGNS TO WALL STRUCTURES William Keast, Hazel Park, Mich. Application November 21, 1946, Serial No. 711,412

18 Claims.

This inventionrelatesto building structures and particularly to applying a decorative finish to cementitious surfaces.

An important object of this invention is to provide improved means for economically and rapidly applying a decorative finish to cementitious surfaces and particularly to exterior coatings of concrete material applied to building walls. Another object of the invention is to provide novel means for decorating concrete facings so as to closely simulate the design of a brick Wall and the like which accurately and quickly guides the workmen as they shape the facing to the desired design and is highly economical in practice.

p More particularly, an important object of this invention is to provide an improved building implement or tool device for delineating or marking a brick design or the like upon outside facings or coatings which is inexpensive to make and assemble and is highly convenient and accurate in use and can be employed by either skilled or unskilled labor for marking large areas of building walls. Another object of this invention is to provide such a tool device which is formed of parts light in weight and shaped for convenient handling and attachment and detachment from one another in use. A further object of this invention is to provide such a tool device including a supporting structure which is preferably temporarily secured to the building wall above the area to bedecorated in accordance with this invention and further including a tool guiding implement of a size and weight convenient for one man to handle which is capable of lateral and vertical shiftable movement relative to the supporting structure and while suspended thereby to form the desired design over a large area of the wall. An important feature of the invention is the association with the implement of a novel marking tool shaped for travel over certain designated portions of the implement and at the same time cleanly cut out and remove portions of the wall surface to form grooves which delineate the wall into the appearance of a brick design.

Various other objects, advantages and meritorious features of this invention will become more fully apparent from the following specification, appended claims and accompanying drawings, wherein:

Fig. 1 is a perspective view of a building showing one wall surfaced finished in accordance with this invention, Fig. 2 is an enlarged side elevation of a part of a bu ldingwall showing the implement of the present invention overlying the surface thereof preparatory to marking the surface with a brick design,

Fig. 3 is a detail view in side elevation of an auxiliary marking tool,

Fig. 4 is an enlarged sectional view of the finished wall of Fig. 1 taken along line 4 -4 thereof,

Fig. 5 is an enlarged detail sectional View along line 5 5 of Fig. 2,

Fig. 6 is a sectional View along Fig. 3,

Fig. 7 is a longitudinal sectional view through a grooving tool employed in this invention illustrating the manner of indenting the surface coating to form a brick design,

Fig. 8 is a longitudinal sectional View at right angles to the View of Fig. 7 taken along 'line B8 thereof,

Fig. 9 is a perspective View of a rounded corner portion of a building illustrating the manner of applying the brick design'thereto, and

Fig. 10 is a view of the operating end of a scratcher tool for applying certain markings to the surface finish to simulate a brick design.

The resulting appearanceof a building structure to which this invention has been applied is illustrated in Fig. 1. In this view a building generally indicated at In is shown with the front Wall [2 finished in accordance with this invention. The side wall M is shown before the application of the outside protective coating or veneer upon which the brick design is impressed. Prior to the application of this coating, the walls of the building may be of any suitable material such as the conventional wooden frame members used extensively on house constructions, masonry, or reinforced concrete or cinder blocks. The walls of the building structure of Fig. 1 are shown as first formed of concrete orcinder blocksas the wall I4 typifies. Over this wall'is laid. an outer protective coating which is indented or grooved as hereinafter described to form the brick design as illustrated by the wall I2.

In carrying out this invention the wall'of a building which may be of wood, concrete or cinder blocks construction is overlaid with a base layer or coating of concrete formed of Portland cement or the like. Preferably before this layer takes a permanent set a second layer orcoating line 5+6 of is applied having crushed brick granules orf the I like incorporated therein. Fig. 4 shows a Wall structure so formed. The concrete or cinder block wall is indicated at l6 and serves as a foundation for the protective anddecorative veneer laid thereover. Spread over this foundation wall is a layer of concrete l8 of which Portland cement is preferably one of the constituents. This layer serves as a base layer for a second coating 26 which is preferably although not necessarily applied to the base layer before it hardens and takes a permanent set. This second coating serves as the outside finish or facing for the wall and is preferably composed of crushed brick granules mixed with Portland cement and applied in a plastic state. The surface finish may be of any suitable color or of varied colors throughout-its extent. In the process of applying the two layers l3 and 28 it is preferred to have the thickness of the base layer at least twice that of the outside layer. In certain instances the base layer may be of considerable thickness to fill out cavities and recessed areas in the foundation wall it. Since the two layers forming the Wall are of concrete composition, they form a durable waterproof, weatherproof and fireproof surfacing constituting an integral part of the wall structure.

The base layer ['8 is relatively thick as compared with the outer layer 26 and although it may be applied to a rough foundation wall it provides a smooth fiat surface for the application of the outer layer. In making up the compositions of the two layers it is preferred to provide material which gives the outside layer a color which contrasts with the base layer. Before the outside layer takes a permanent set, portions are removed to expose the base layer and provide a decorative appearance. Preferably such exposure is accomplished along predetermined horizontal and vertical lines to provide a pattern simulating a brick Wall such as shown by the wall [2 of Fig. 1..

To accomplish this decorative effect with ease and rapidity the tool device illustrated in the balance of the figures maybe used. The parts of such a device comprise a part which is temporarily fixed to the wall and certain movable parts which form guides for cutting away and exposing the base layer l8 along horizontal and vertical lines. An elongated supporting member generally indicated at 22 in Fig. 2 is adapted to be temporarily fixed to the wall preferably immediately above the area to be decorated with the brick design. As shown more particularly in Fig. 5, this supporting member comprises a relatively thick strip 24 of wood or the like attached to one side of a relatively thin strip of metal 26. The latter is wider than the wooden element 24 and as shown the resulting marginal projecting portion 28 is arranged to project from one side of the wooden strip throughout its length. The marginal portion is bent backwardly toward the Wooden strip or otherwise shaped to form an upwardly'opening channel running the length of the member 22. This channel formation serves 4 A similar series of holes is provided in the metal strip 26 and these holes register with those in the wooden strip to form openings extending from the front side of the member 22 to the back side. These holes serve a dual function. In the first place they serve as means through which fastening elements in the form of nails or bolts may extend to secure the supporting member 22 to a wall upon which the design is to be formed. Fig. 5 illustrates a nail 32 in dotted outline extending through one ofthe holes and entering the foundation wall for support therefrom. It is understcod that only as many nails or bolts are as a track for the purposes described hereinafter. V

A desirable length for the supporting member is approximately nine or ten feet for convenience in needed as are necessary to carry the load of the tool device and usually only two or three such supporting elements are required for the device illustrated herein. In the second place the holes serveas indicia for locating the positions for marking the vertical lines or joints of the design. For forming a brick design the holes are spaced apart from one another a distance equal to half the length of an ordinary building brick, or approximately 4 /2 inches apart, and they are herein illustrated in this spatial relation.

Detachably suspended from the horizontal supporting member 22 and movable longitudinal therealong are two elongated vertical members 32. Preferably these members are formed of relatively thin flexible strips of metal such as spring steel. The upper ends of these members are shaped for engagement in the track formed by the marginal channel portion 28 of the horizontal supporting member 22. As shown in Fig. 5 this is preferably accomplished by bending the upper end of each member 32 at an angle to form a short outwardly inclined section 34 and then further bending the extremity 36 inwardly upon itself to form a downwardly opening U-shaped hook which is received over the outer edge of the channel 28 of the supporting'member 22. In this manner the vertical members are removably suspended from the horizontal supporting members and brought up flush against the surface of the facing material 23.

The two vertical members 32 support a detachable framework or guiding form for shaping the horizontal lines or joints of a brick design; At spaced intervals along the lengths of the two members are supports for the framework in the form of outwardly projecting studs or pins 38 as clearly shown in Fig. 5. The framework comprises a plurality of parallel members or bars 49 arranged in the same plane and spaced slightly apart. These members are coextensive in length and are connected together into a unitary structure by a cross member 42 at each end thereof. Preferably the bars 40 are formed of the same material as the vertical members 32, that is to say, they are composed of strips of spring steel. As a result, they may be collectively flexed or bowed to a considerable degree for purposes hereinafter mentioned. The cross members are preferably formed of narrow lengths of steel welded or otherwise secured to the parallel bars 40 and serve to maintain them in the properly spaced apart condition. For forming .a brick design, each parallel bar 40 has lateral dimension equal to the short width of a conventional building brick, such as 2% inches. The top member or bar of the framework may be narrower if desired, such as 1% inches in width. The bars 40 are equally spaced apart from one another to form slots 43 each havingv a width substantially equal to the mortar joint between bricks of a conventional brick wall.

aeoazsz As shown in Fig. 2, the guiding form is supported upon the projecting studs 38 by laying the form flat against the vertical members'32 with the studs projecting through any one of the slots separating the parallel bars 40. Preferably the guiding form is supported by having the pins or of this guiding form, it is detached from the vertical members 32 and shifted to another set of studs 38 at a lower level.

After the horizontal lines of the brick wall design have been formed, the vertical lines or joints are applied by a guiding form suspended from the supporting member 22in the same manner as the framework previously described. Referring to Fig. 2 there is shown a guiding form consisting of a single vertical member or bar 44 formedpreferably of a strip of spring steel. This member is provided with two rows of short vertical slots 4646 alternately staggered with respect to one another as shown in Fig. 2. The centerline of each row of slots is spaced from one another a distance equal to one-half the length of a conventional building brick. The upper end 48 of themember 44 of this guiding form is shaped in the same manner as the two vertical m embers 32-32 for detachable slidable connectionto the channel track 28 of. the supporting member- 22.

another one-half the length of a conventional building brick; Accordingly they may serve as indicia means for indicating the positions to mark the vertical mortar joints of the design. When using this form to mark the vertical joints, the two rows of slots 4646 are brought successively into alignment with each pair of holes.3ll of the form 22' and in this manner the workmen are provided with a rule for guiding them ,quickly and accurately in forming the vertical joints of the brick design. 7

The tool which is used in connection with the vertical and horizontal guiding forms previously described for simulating the joints of the, brick Wall design is illustrated in Figs. '7 and 8. Such a tool is shaped to enterthe slots and 46 of the guiding forms and is drawn along the slots -to remove those portions of the outer facing 28 1 under these slots so as to expose-the base layer l8 to view. Preferably the tool comprises a handle portion 50 which-may be made ofwood or other suitable material and carries on one or .both ends agrooving element shaped to enter the slots and dislodge the facing material therefrom. Each grooving element preferably comprises a U-shaped metal member having the legs thereof secured to the handle portion 50 so as to form an extension thereof. One such a grooving element as shown at 52 having a rounded end 54 predisposed in spaced relationship to the adjacent end of the handle portion 50. The other grooving element as indicated at 56'is provided with a relatively squared end 58 which is similarly disposed in spaced relationship to the adjacent end of the handle portion 50; The legs of each grooving element are spaced apart from one another sufficiently to slidably fit the slots in the guiding forms as shown in Fig. 8. Any

suitable means may be employed for securing these grooving elements 'to their respective ends of the handle portion and as shown at the right in' Fig. 8 a rivet 60 may be used for thispurpose. However, it is desired to have at least one end of the tool provided with means for enabling the workmen to exert considerable pressure in the direction of the wall and'at the same time to draw the tool without difficulty along the ,slot in which it is inserted. To accomplish this purpose either one or both ends of the tool'is provided withone or more rollers which bear against the outer surfaces of the horizontal bars 40 or the vertical bars 44. In the tool of Figs. 7 and 8, two rollers 62- 62 are provided mounted on opposite sides of the handle portion. These rollers are journaled for rotation about a shaft 64 which extends through the handle portion 58 and projects beyond the opposite sides thereof for this purpose. In the illustrated embodiment of the tool, the shaft 64 also serves asth'e means for securing the adjacent grooving ele- 'ment 52 to the handle portion as is evident in pressure towards the wall the grooving element will enter the facing 20 to a depth at least equal to if not greater than its thickness. The rollers are of such a size and so located with respect to the end 54 of the grooving element that when they engage the outer surfaces of the guiding bars they serve as stops limiting further insertion of the grooving element into the wall." However, the depth of the cut may be varied slightly by changing the angle of the grooving tool to the plane of the wall. Upon drawing the tool '50 at the angle shown in Fig. 7 lengthwise along the slot the material'of the outer'facing under the slot will be dislodged and removed out of the slot over the end 54 in the manner illustrated in Fig. 7, the rollers providing relatively frictionless movement of the handle as'it is drawn along'the slot. Preferably the rollers are formed of relatively yieldable material such as rubber or the like but they may be of any other composition if desired. By exerting pressure on the tool as it is operated, the rollers will flex the form members upon which they bear compactly against the wall-facing enabling the legs of the U-shaped grooving element entering a slot to cleanly cut the wall facing along the lines delineated by the sidewalls of the slot. In using the equipment thus far described, it is preferred to form the representation of the horizontal joints before the representation of the vertical joints are formed. Referring to Fig. 2, the guiding form comprising the horizontal parallel bars 40 is supported upon the vertical members 32 over an area of the wall below approximately one-half of the length of the supporting member 22. The tool, as illustrated in Figs. 7 and '8, is now employed to cut the joints in line with the-slots 43. After all the joints have been cut out with the form in this position, the form is shifted, as previously described, to overlie an area below that in which the grooves have already been shaped. The vertical members 32 are preferably of such a length that the horizontal form dimension in a vertical plane.

can be shifted therealong to cover an area approximately three times its over all width.

Grooves or joints already formed by this device are shown at on the right side of the wall area illustrated in Fig. 2. In the position illustrated in Fig. 2, the device has been shifted to the top of the wall area for the commencement of a secand series of grooves or joints on the left side of the wall area of Fig. 2, which joints will align with those indicated at H1. 1

The vertical marking tool comprising the member 44, is shown in Fig. 2 as having formed the vertical grooves or joints 12 on the right side thereof. The form is being shifted leftwardly in Fig. 2 along the track 28 and the slots 46-46 aligned successively with each pair of holes 30. The slots are shown in alignment with one pair of holes preparatory to forming the vertical joints. In simulation of a brick designthe joints [2 are alternately staggered in the manner shown at the right of the form in Fig. 2.

As previously described, the outer facing is preferably formed of material which contrasts in colorto the base layer l8. As a result, when the base layer is exposed to view by the grooving tool, it contrasts sharply with the color of thematerial of the facing 20. A desirable combination of colors is a light or yellowish brick color in the outer facing contrasting with a darker color of the base layer l3. As a result, a brick design is formed which simulates a conventional brick wall composed of light or yellowish colored bricks joined by mortar of a darker color. It is evident that any contrast in color relationship may be employed and the outer facing given a reddish brick color to contrast with a base layer of lighter color and the resulting structure has the appearance of red bricks joined together by mortar of a lighter hue.

The form illustrated in Figs. 3 and 6 is generally similar to the horizontal marking form previously described but is intended to be used for simulating building bricks arranged with their longest This particular form, for example, may be used to delineate vertically arranged bricks such as those indicated at 14 above the windows of the wall [2 in Fig. 1. For this reason the form of Figs. 3 and 6 is relatively short and may have a length that is approximately equal to twice the length of a conventional building brick.

Referring particularly to Figs. 3 andG, theform comprises a plurality of parallel members or bars 18 supported in slightly spaced apart relationship by end cross members 8il80 which may be Welded thereto. Overlying one endof the members I8 is an outwardly projecting member 82 which may be formed of wood or like material. This member corresponds generallyto the member 24 employed in connection with the supporting member 22. It serves as a handle and also as a support for securing the form to the building wall during the grooving operations. It may be undercut as at 84 to facilitate handling. When used to form the vertical brick design, as indicated at 16 in Fig. 1, the handle portion 82 is turned toward the wall and engaged with the upper or lower edge opening of the window. Guided in this manner, the form is capable of marking the vertical joints between the bricks with use of the same or similar-v tool as that illustrated in Figs. 7 and 8.

Many building structures are provided ,with

rounded corners such as that illustrated at 83,

in Fig. 1. To extend the horizontal grooves ,the mortar lines.

Formed of spring steel or the like, the tool may be flexed or bowed considerably to follow the curvature of the corner of the building. While so held, another workman may use a marking tool of the type previously described and cut out grooves or joints along the top and bottom parallel edges of the strip 90.

After the building wall has been properly delineated with the desired brick design, the outer faces of the artificial bricks may be slightly indented or scratched to more closely simulate a building brick wall. A tool for such purpose is illustrated in Fig. 10 and comprises a handle 94 carrying a cross member 96 on the end thereof to which are attached a plurality of pointed elements 98. These elements may be a series of U-shaped members having theirclosed ends secured to the cross member 96 in a manner illustrated in Fig. 10. This scratching tool as its name signifies is applied by vertical strokes to the outer facing 20 to form vertical markings 100 on' the brick representations as illustrated in Fig. 9. The scratches so formed barely indent the surface of the facing 20 and are of considerable less depth than the joints previously formed in the surfacing material of the Wall.

In applying the coatings or layers [8 and 2B, the base layer I8 is preferably at least twice as thick as the outer layer 18. When the latter is cut out to simulate the mortar joints between bricks of a conventional brick wall, its thickness should correspond with the usual depth of the recesses-formed by the mortar joints in the face of the brick wall. For such a design the outer layer or facing 29 should therefore be approximately /8 to /2 inches in thickness. To simulate a different type of brick or stone wall, it may be desirable to. have an outer facing of less or greater thickness. The brick granules incorporated in the material of the outer facing serves as a pigment therefor. Brick granules may be similarly incorporated in the material of the base layer to imparta desired color thereto. As previously mentioned, the color of the outer facing may contrast with the color of the base layer to sharply delineate the bricks of the design from Following the formation of the mortar lines, certain of the bricks of the design may be brushed or overlaid with a thin coating containing brick granules of a slightly different color so that when the design on the wall is viewed as a whole several of the bricks will stand out in comparison with the balance.

Following the use of the guiding tool implements, if any cement material sticks to the flexible metal parts, it may be quickly dislodged or snapped therefrom by flexing the'parts.

What I claim is:

1. Apparatus for forming a design upon a wall facing of cement or the like comprising, in combination, an elongated horizontal supporting member adapted to be attached to a wall above the area upon which the design is to be formed, two or more elements of substantially the same length and width, means for joining the ends of said elements together and acting to maintain 9 member to overlie the area upon which the design is to be formed.

2. Apparatus for forming a design upon a wall facing of cement compound or the like comprising, in combination, an elongated horizontal supporting member adapted to be attached to a wall above the area upon which the design is to be formed, two or more flexible metal strips of substantially the same length and width,

means for joining the ends of said strips andpredisposing the strips in the same plane in parallel slightly spaced apart relation, atrack extending substantially the length of said supporting member, and means for suspending said elements from said track so as to overlie the area;

upon which the design is to be performed and movable along the track.

3. Apparatus for forming a brick design upon a wall facing of cement composition or the like comprising, in combination, an elongated horizontal supporting member adapted to be attached to the wall above the working area upon which the design is to be formed, a plurality of members of substantially the same length and each having a Width equal to the side face of a building brick, means connecting the ends of said plurality of members and forming a rectangular frame in which the members are arranged in the same plane and in parallel slightly spaced apart relation from one another, the distances separating said plurality of members from one another being equal to the width of a mortar joint separating the bricks of a brick wall, a track extending substantially the length of said supporting member, vertical supporting members having a length at least twice the width of said rectangular frame, means for suspending one end of said vertical members from said track and providing movement thereof along the track, and means for detachably mounting said rectangular frame upon said vertical members at a plurality of positions therealong to overlie different sections of the working area of the wall below the horizontal supporting member.

4. Apparatus for forming a brick design upon a wall facing of cement composition or the like comprising, in combination, an elongated sup porting member adapted to be attached in horizontal position above the working area upon which the design is to be formed, a plurality of similarly shaped flat metallic bars each having a length shorter than the length of said horizontal supporting member and each having a width substantially equal to the thickness of a conventional building brick, means connecting the ends of said plurality of bars together in to a rectangular frame in which the plurality of bars are arranged in parallel relationship to one another in the same plane and spaced apart from one another a distance substantially equal to the width of mortar joints separating the bricks of a conventional brick wall, a pair of vertical supporting members having a length at least twice the width of said rectangular frame, a track extending substantially the length of said horizontal supporting member, means for suspending one end of said vertical supporting members from said track and providing movement thereof along the track, and means for detachably mounting said rectangular frame upon said vertical members at a plurality of positions therealong to overlie different sections of the working area below the horizontal supporting member.

5. Apparatus for forming a brick design upon an outer facing of cement composition or the like applied to a wall comprising, in combination, an elongated horizontal supporting member adapted to be mountedin substantially horizontal position over an area of a wall surface upon which the design is to be produced, said member having a series of indications exposed to View which exand providing lateral shiftable movement of the ,tool in such suspended state lengthwise of the member to predispose the tool in alignment with any one of said indications.

6. Apparatus for formingv a brick design upon an outer facing of cement composition or the like applied to a wall comprising, in combination, an elongated horizontal supporting member having a series of holes arranged in equally spaced apart relationship longitudinally along a substantial portion of the length of the member and indicating the vertical mortar joints separating the bricks of a conventionally laid horizontal row of building bricks, means adapted to extend through certain of said holes to support the member in horizontal position above the working area upon which the design is to be formed, an elongated vertical guiding tool having a longitudinal slot therein, a track carried by said supporting member extending a substantial portion of the length thereof, and means for suspending one end of said tool from saidtrack so as to overlie said working area and providing bodily shiftable movement of the tool while: so suspended along the track for positioning the slot of thetool in alignment with said holes.

7. Apparatus for forming a brick design upon an outer facing of cement composition or the like applied to a wall comprising, in combination, an elongated horizontal supporting member having a series of holes arranged in equally spaced apart relationship longitudinally along a substantial l portion of the length of the member and indicating the vertical mortar joints separating the bricks of a conventionally laid horizontal row of building bricks, means adapted to extend through certain of said holes to support the member in horizontal position above the working area upon which the design is to be formed, an elongated vertical guiding form having two rows of longitudinally'extending slots spaced from one another a distance equal to substantially one-half the 'length of a conventional building brick, said slots being atlernately staggered throughout a substantial portion of the length of the form and each defining an area substantially equal to the vertical joint separating two conventional horizontally laid building bricks, a track carried by said supporting member extending a substantial portion of the length thereof, and means for suspending one end of said form from said track so as to overlie said working area and for providing bodily shiftable movement of the form while so suspended along the track for positioning the two rows of slots successively in alignment with each pair of said holes in the supporting member.

11. along the wall facing for-cutting lines therein in simulation of mortarjoints, said iorn having a plurality of} parallel extending narrow slots through which a grooving tool may extend;means. for suspending said form fromfsaid supporting. member to overlie the area upon which the design i to b me and ma 1 1 t e su eifi g member for indicating positiorisf thereonj from which toisu'spendtheform for guiding thejg'roov ing' tool along lines "simulating rtar joints,

9. Apparatus for forming a design upon a wall facing of cement compositionand the like comprising, in combination, an "elongated hori i zontal supporting member 7 adapted (to "be" at? tached to a'wallabove the areaupon which the design is'to' be formed and shaped to provide a horizontal trach extending substantially the length thereof; a' tool guiding form having a plurality of relatively long uninterrupted paral lel extending slots through which a "grooving" tool may extend for cutting grooves'in the wall facing in simulation of mortar joints,"and means: for suspending said'form frorn's'aid supporting niember to overlie ajportion ofthe' area upon which the design is'to beproduced and for providingmovement of the rormflaiongthe track to overlie other'portions of the'de'sign'area.

IOJAp'paratus for Torminga" design upon an outer facing of a cement "composition and the like appliedto a wall comprising; in combination, an elongated" horizontal supporting member Z adaptedto be attached to awall' above thearea upon whi'ch 'the"d'esign is to be formed and" shaped to "provide a" horizontal" track "extending a substantial portionof the lengththereof, an

elongated vertical tool guiding'meiriber'having two parallel longitudinally extending "rows of aligned cut-outs defining portions of the design area in which a grooving tool may be operated.

thecut-outs' of one row'bein'galternately staggered with respect to the cut-outsof the other row, and means' fo'r suspending one end of the vertical member fromthe horizontal member so as tooverliea section of'the design area and providing bodily shiftable movement of the vertical member along the track of' the "horizontal member to area- 11v In combination, 1 a form comprising aflex ible member adapted to overlie a cementitious wall facing and provided with apluralityof correspondingly shaped-slots 1 therein, the surface of the member forming the-:opposite-marginal portions .of the: slots beingfiat and forming run.- 1 Ways, agrooving .toolhaving a Ueshaped gouging,

element on one end thereof souarranged :that the legs of the element slidably fituandproject throughzvany one of said slots and t that upon movement ofthetool therealong the closed end of-the element will remove portions of the Wall 0 facingztoform a groove therein, and rollerscarried; by the .tool on opposite sides for, the

gouging; element. adapted to .be pressed against the marginal runways t-on- QDDQsite- Sidesthe 5 member-through which the element projects and flex the -member vcompactly. againsti the .wall facing as they roll therealong. t

ber adapted to bepositioned above an area of a wall surface upon which thedesignis to be producedga forni icr guiding a, grooving tool. over ptw ansurrace forcutting linestherein, said 7 form having a narrow elongated slot through which agrooving tool may extend, andjmeans;

le a ei s erl o m ne a en b i wall facing ofacementcomposition and the like v comprising, in combination, a supporting memoverlie other-sections: of the design for suspending the form from'the supporting member in a' vertical plane and'fin overlying substantially flush relationship to the wall area' upon which the designis to be producedi '13 Apparatus 'fonfori'nilngja"design "upon wall facing of fa [cement composition and the I like comprising, in combination; an elongated supporting" memberf adapted to flee mounted @infi substantially horizontal position fover' ian area of r a wall su face upon" which the :des'i gnis to be" produced; a form for guiding a grooving tool over the surface of the wall forflcutting'dine'sl therein,;said "form having a plurality or narrow parallel I extendin'g' slots "through which "the: grooving "tool "may extend for cutting parallel: line'sinthewall surface, "and means suspending the -'form from said supportingmember in a vertical plane overlying the area ofthe wall upon which the design is to 'beproducedjand with the slots extendinghoriaontal'ly." H

' 14"." Apparatus for runnin a designj' 'upon" a wall surface of' acem'entf'COmpQsition and the likecomprising; in combination",- an elongated; horizontal supporting member, neans for mount-'- ing "said'suppo'rting member "insubstantiaily" horizontal position over an areaof a: wall surface? upon whichthedesign is to be produced; "a form forfguidin'g' a groovingtool having a' pluralityfof narrow elongated slots through which a'- grooving tool may extendflmeans suspending said-form from said s'upportin'g member in a vertical plane and substantially flush with the surface area" of thewall upon which the designis to'be produced,

and means providing bodily shiftable' movement of the" form along the supporting fmember to;

overlieotherfareas of thewall surface, 7

15. Apparatusfor' guidingi'a tool for'cutting a groove design in an outer cementitious' layer of a'buildin'gwall prior to the setting thereof comprising, yin *combinatio'n a formhaving a fiat side adaptedto overlie a portion of the cementitious layer'and' lie substantially"fiush thereagainst; said form provided with at least one opening therethrou'gh for receiving a grooving tool, means forsupporting the form 'ina'vertical" plane substantially flushagainst anareaof the cerrientitious "layer but without attachment thereto,- and: means providing b odily shiftable move'mentof the form while so supported for' overlying other area's of the cemc-zntitious layer.

16. 'Apparatus' for forming a design "upon" a" wall facing of a" cement composition and the'l like"comprising, in combination; an elongated vertical too'lguidingmember having two paral lel longitudinallyextending rows ofaligned cut-f outs spaced from one another'a distance equal to'substantially one-half the length of a conventional building brick, the' 'c'ut-outs o'fonerow being alternately staggeredwith respect-to the cut-outs of the other row' and each cut-out 'defining an area substantially" equal to the vertical joint separatingtwo *conventional horizontally laid building bricks; q

1'7 Apparatus r for-forming a spaced apart, frorn one anothera distance substantially equal to the distance separating the ally from the opposite side of the member and serving as a handle.

18. A form for delineating a grooved design upon a, cementitious wall facing comprising a flat metallic sheet having two parallel rows of aligned cut-outs, said rows being spaced apart from one another a distance equal to substantially one-half the length of a conventional building brick and having the cut-outs of each row alternately staggered with respect to the cutouts of the other row. each cut-out of said rows defining an area substantially equal vto the vertical joint separating two conventional horizontally laid building bricks and serving as an opening through the metallic sheet into which a grooving tool is insertable for grooving a wall facing over which the sheet is laid.

WILLIAM KEAST.

14 REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file ofthis patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 564,204 Leeds July 21, 1896 826,425 Heathoote July 17, 1906 833,675 Chezem Oct; 16, 1906 923,875 McDonald June 8, 1909 1,149,436 Fratt Aug. 10, 1915 1,293,313 Berkofi Feb. 4, 1919 1,298,995 Michalovitz Apr. 1, 1919 1,367,924 Sibly Feb. 8, 1921 1,564,578 Kennedy Dec. 8, 1925 1,742,332 Vincent Jan. 7, 1930 1,999,903 Harshberger Apr. 30, 1935 Polak June 20, 1939

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4010592 *Jan 16, 1976Mar 8, 1977Roy NixonTemplate for and method of cutting composition shingles for rapid and scrap-free installation
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US8590238 *Dec 30, 2011Nov 26, 2013Thomas L. PolakArtificial brick finish for walls
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Classifications
U.S. Classification33/454, 156/62, 52/314, 15/235.3
International ClassificationE04F21/02, E04F21/16
Cooperative ClassificationE04F21/16
European ClassificationE04F21/16