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Publication numberUS2602765 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 8, 1952
Filing dateDec 29, 1947
Priority dateJan 13, 1947
Also published asDE888988C
Publication numberUS 2602765 A, US 2602765A, US-A-2602765, US2602765 A, US2602765A
InventorsAhier George C, Champagnat Alfred V, Tirmont Jean F M
Original AssigneeAhier George C, Champagnat Alfred V, Tirmont Jean F M
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Method of manufacturing fabrics having a support backing and upstanding pile
US 2602765 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

July 8, 1952 G c. AHIER 2,602,765

ETAL METHOD OF MANUFACTURING FABRICS HAVING A SUPPORT BACKINGAND UPSTANDING FILE Filed Dec. 29, 1947 FIG. I FIG. 2

INVE'NTORS GEORGES C. AHIER ALFRED V. CHAMPAGNAT JEAN F. M. TIRMONT BY M, 9&W

/ AT ORNEYS Patented July 8, 1952 UNITED- STATES- METHOD or MANUFA HAVING A SUPPORT STANDING PILE CTURING memos.

BACKING,

GeorgesC. Ahier, Alfred Ohampagnahand. 1 Jean F. M. Tirmont, Paris, .Erance Application December 29, 1947; SerialNo, 7943290 In France January 3, 1947 1 A corded material (carpet, velvet, etc.,) is comprised essentially by a support or backing of woven textile fibers and by U-shaped cords knotted orattached to the backing by textile threads. A very commonmethod consists in previously manufacturing chenilles which are. made up of U-shaped cords-tied togetherin a straight line by several textile fibers. The chenilles are then fixed on the backing by a system oftextile knots.

Figure 1 shows a chenille constituted by. U-shaped cords I tied together by textile threads 2 and 3.

These manufacturing methods are veryv slow, complicated and require a huge amount of threads and-animportant work force. Thusthe products are of ahigh cost.

The object of the present invention is to.obvi-..

ate these various drawbacks.

It concerns a method for the manufacture of materials or similar products, especially carpets, in which the chenille is: fixed on.its support by gluing, which makes it possible to obtain products superior to those manufactured at present, While allowing a considerable saving in textile threads, a.- great simplicity and a high speed of manufacture, aswell as an important reduction of the necessary work personnel. By an appropriate choice of the backing, the strength of the product, its soundlessness and its adherence to the floor are also increased.

In accordance. with-one type. of embodiment of the. invention, the chenilles are attached by. glu-v ing to a support or backing.

In. accordance with amodification, the chenilles are. themselves. manufactured by gluing, before being attached. by.- gluing tothe. support or backing.

The invention extends methods, but also, by way of new industrial prode nets, to textileproducts similar. to those obtained by previous. methods, such as :chenilles, materials;

carpets and-such products,

The invention also extends to other charace teristicsdescribed hereinafter and tov their variouspossible combinations.

Products according to,

method are described by way of non-limitative examples and with reference to the appended drawings wherein:

Fig. 2 shows a warp and a woof used for the manufacture of a chenille in accordancewith the invention.

Fig. 3. is' a view, in perspective; of a chenille mountedon; a thread;

Fig. 4 is a view in perspective ofa chenille mounted on two threads@ r V Fig. 5 is a view inelevation of an apparatus for'the fixation or the chenilles on their supports.

A method in accordance with the invention isnot only to the above.

those obtainedpby the. met od; and. insta at on or. arry aout he toleime. (01. new

. R'is (or are)v glued: insidethe U with glilej,

' U. with ue-w,

described hereinunder. byway. of? nonelimitative example inthe manufacture of.a. chenille; by, gluing. Y A- textile thread. is previously coatedwithrubee ber 'latex to which: the. appropriate..ingredientsz-. forvulcanization have been added: for. instance zinc oxide .5, sulphur 2%., accelerator. 1%.,.ant1'e-:. oxygen 1%,with respect toetheerubben.

This coating may also.be.-made with emulsions: of polyvinylechlor-ide or. its. copolymers, super: polyamides, etc., solutions may.-a1'so:be,use.d1:of;; synthetic. resins. of. :various vkind s,...or: other a adv.. hesives, orv these adhesives ..or: melted resins .softe; ened or plasticized,etc.,may beused. A. grid. or quadrille; is ....fcrmed;.by;'the superposition: of a sheet-.of textilethreads, coated with; rubber.- base glues; synthetic. resins, .etc.,. and: a sheet of wool threads or. other uncoatedstextileafor. formingthe. cords. proper; By'means; of: a, slight pressure, a suflicient; g1uing:is.obtained bee. tween theacoated: and the uncoated threads.

Figur 2-; shows av schematic; view. of; theglued; canvas:v in accordance with; the invention, (and the threads-.parallelthereto). arethe threads; coated with. adhesives, yy, (and the threads; parallel. thereto) are the. unooated threads: for; forming the cords. Once the gluing has been; effected, the. threadsgyyf are cut, at AB, A'B; in accordance. with; the; conventional method of the:- textile-industry for the, manufacture .of chenilles; for sieves. Thez heet.ofichenillesth s tains then .goesethrough afiutedcylinder; heated,-,which bendsz thecordthreads in the shape of a. U.

The chenille obtained is schematizedpn Elevure 3; Thethread' (or threads); which are coated,

which ensures a greater strength.

By. the same me hod ..a. en lle a also be manufactured comprising two; or more coatedthr ads. I 6'. I'. ne F lued i s d the-i e. o her (QM-them). o si e w h; lue 5a, wh eh cilita e s ums: oi the; chenille on; the backing (Figure 4;) V 4 -.T1:1e,;methp.d:a s ies- 0 t e: x t on .bllv gluing 0f..th.e.: Ch, I l 6 th sobtainedm any others, Oriana-su por orbackine- '1.

a The chenilles-.thhsusedmay bemanufactured: as indicated above. They may-alsobemanuface. tured, without .5 any; gluingw by. the; conventional methods. on the; textile industry; or, any; other:

method. .1

The..cheni1les:.-are;. generally coated,. at: their: bases, witha rubber latex, an; emulsion or:at:s.0. .-.s lution: ofan .adhesiveor. any.- otherzgluing: agent, consistent withtheglue and sup.port adoptedf i.

Some particularly advantageous. typesizofc supeport or backingaregiven hereinafterby wayfoff example.

(a) A- simple backing woven: ottextile or-feltt lb) There may also be used as a backing a rubber band, vulcanized or not, loaded or not with various textile or non-textile loads or both. It is also possible to choose rubber, vulcanized or not, reinforced by isolated textile fibers, or arranged in parallel sheets, of canvas or material, etc. The same combination may be made with any kindsof synthetic resins, polyvinyl chloride and their co-polymers, superpolyamides, etc. Alternately, it is possible to use more or less flexible plates of agglomerates of any kind, such as, for instance, those of sawdust, meal, chips or wood fiber, wool or glass fiber, cork, alpha etc., linoleum, dummies, etc.

- (c) A very important modification consists in using as a backing a band of non-vulcanized rubber, the composition of which includes a suitable proportion (1 to 5% or more) of a substance such as diazoaminobenzene which is decomposed during the final vulcanization of the finished material, givin a spongy, flexible and low density structure. Finally, such a backing can be obtainedin large thicknesses and its compressibllity is a very interesting property for a corded material, particularly for carpets. With an equal thickness, products are thus obtained of an unusual lightness and flexibility and of a very low manufacturing. cost.

-(d) The backing can also consist of spongy rubber, so-called sponge rubber, pre-vulcanized.

(c) It is also possible to choose as a backing, synthetic resins or plastic materials made spongy by the same method, polyvinyl chloride and its co-polymers, superpolyamides etc.

(I) In the case of the use of these spongy rubbers or synthetic resins, it is advantageous, to increase the tearing resistance, to reinforce them by a material, a canvas, or simply by parallel textile fibers, which are fixed by gluing, previously or during the gluin of the chenilles on the backing.

(9) For making the backing there may also be used any other suitable materials offering the necessary'mechanical qualities and capable of bein glued to the chenilles, such as, for instance, agglomerates of silicates or coaltar, of petroleum, etc. made of wood meal, wool, cotton. glass fibers, cork, etc.

The chenilles, arranged parallel and as close as desired are glued onto the backing by a slight pressure.

In each case, the glue which is most appropriate for the coating of the chenilles and for the corresponding backing is used. For instance, lit-"is preferable, for gluing the chenilles coated with rubber, or with synthetic resins on the backing of a similar nature. to select a glue of the same kind. One can also use, however, one or several intermediate suitable adhesives.

Particularly advantageous embodiments of the invention are given hereinafter byway of nonlimitative examples:

(a) Chenilles of the conventional type obtained by weaving, and a woven textile backing.

The bases of the chenilles arranged in sheets were coated with rubber latex containing the ingredients for vulcanization. The backing was also coated on one face with the same vulcanizable latex. Before or after drying, the chenilles are pressed against the backing to cause the gluing. vulcanization is then effected. Wool, for instance, stands very well the thermal vulcanization treatment for the rubber. Thus, the fixation of the chenilles on the backing by the conventional methods of the textile industry,

which is the most costly and slowest part of the manufacture of carpets, is avoided.

By using chenilles made of cord threads of different colors, selected and arranged at will, as for the conventional carpets, corded materials with designs can be obtained.

The chenilles thus attached to the backing are attached more strongly than by the conventional method, and the materials manufactured in accordance with the invention can be out along any direction, which is not the case for the conventional chenille materials.

(b) Chenilles manufactured according to the method of the invention and backing of non-vulcanized rubber.

On one hand, a mixture of rubber with the plasticizer, filling, sulphur, zinc oxide, accelerator and anti-oxygen was prepared. It was then press rolled to obtain a band, the width of which was equal to that desired for the backing.

On the other hand, the chenilles according to the method of the invention were coated, at their bases, with a rubber latex of the same kind, natural or artificial, as that constituting the backing. In particular, the latex must contain the same accelerator as the backing, for its vulcanization.

After drying of the latex, the chenilles, arranged parallel in sheets, and as close as necessary, were pressed with a slight pressure against the backing, which ensured the gluing. Vulcanization was then eflected.

One modification consists in coating, on one face, the rubber backing with benzol or naphtha solvent, which improves its gluing power. The chenilles coated with latex and dried, or even uncoated are strongly glued by simple pressure on the backing thus coated. One ends again by a vulcanization.

To the rubber mixture of the backing may be added a substance which is decomposed during the vulcanization, releasing gases, which produces a rubber having a cellular or spongy structure.

Materials with designs may also be obtained as indicated in the above type of embodiment.

(c) Chenilles manufactured according to the method of the invention and a vulcanized rubber backing.

The chenilles were prepared as in the above type of embodiment, by impregnation of their bases with a vulcanizable latex.

The backing was made rough, on one face, by mechanical abrasion, then coated with a vulcanizable rubber cement containing a rubber of the same kind, and the same vulcanization accelerator as the latex of the chenilles. rinated rubber may also be incorporated in this cement.

After part of the solvent of the cement had evaporated, the chenilles were fixed by pressure on the face of the backing coated with cement. The drying was then effected and the vulcani zation made. Spongy or cellular rubber can also be used as a backing.

The methods described can be realized on an industrial scale with a material suggested by the techniques used in the rubber industry for the coating of materials and by the weaving industry.

An apparatus for the gluing of the chenilles on their backings is described hereinafter by way of example (Figure 5).

The apparatus comprises:

A fluted cylinder 4 for driving the chenilles and regulating their spacings.

Chlo- Cylinders 5 and 6 for driving and stretching the backing.

A cylinder I and toothed cylinders 8 and 9.

A free toothed cylinder ID for guiding the material.

A driving cylinder H.

A tunnel oven l2 for vulcanization.

The apparatus operates as follows:

The sheet of chenilles l3 comes from the manufacture, the threads being coated with latex as indicated in Figure 4. The sheet is driven by cylinder 4which, at the same time, regulates the spacing of the chenilles.

The non-vulcanized rubber web forming the backing unrolls at IE, it is driven and stretched by cylinders 5 and 6.

The sheet I3 and the backing l5 are applied and glued one over the other by means of the pressure exerted on cylinder 1 by the toothed cylinders 8 and 9.

The material I6 is guided and driven by the cylinders l0 and H inside the tunnel oven l2 where the vulcanization of the latex is effected.

The finished material I! goes out at the end of the oven. The tunnel oven 12 may be replaced by a stove wherein the material is suspended from horizontal bars.

Numerous modifications may be made to the above described examples without exceeding the scope of the invention and especially, multiple applications of this invention can be devised.

The invention extends not only to the above methods but also by Way of new industrial products, to textile products similar to those obtained by the above methods such as chenilles, materials, carpets and the like.

In the text of the present specification and especially when dealing with the threads used for the manufacture and/or the fixation of the chenilles, the word textile" must be understood to apply as well to artificial textiles such as artificial silk, polyamides, vinylic resins, etc. and their likes.

We claim:

1. A process of manufacturing fabric having a support backing and upstanding pile comprising forming a first sheet of adhesive coated parallel warp threads, placing on the first sheet a second sheet of uncoated pile threads parallel to each other and transverse to the warp threads, pressing the threads of the second sheet against the threads of the first sheet to bond them together, cutting the threads of the second sheet between adjacent threads of the first sheet, bending the cut pile thread into U-shape about the warp threads to form a sheet of parallel chenilles in which the free ends of all of the pile threads extend from the same side of the sheet of chenilles and in which the warp threads constitute the opposite side and base of the chenilles, coating the base of the chenilles with an adhesive and contacting the coated base with a support backing to bond the chenilles to the backing.

2. A process of manufacturing fabrics having a support backim; and upstanding pile comprising forming a first" sheet of adhesive coated parallel warp threads, placing on the first sheet a second sheet of uncoated pile threads parallel to each other and transverse to the warp threads, pressing the threads of the second sheet against the threads of the first sheet to bond them together, cutting the threads of the second sheet between adjacent threads of the first sheet, passing the sheet of warp threads carrying the cut pile threads through grooves in a heated cylinder thereby bending the cut pile threads into U-shape about the warp threads to form a sheet of parallel chenilles in which the free ends of all of the pile threads extend from the same side of the sheet of chenilles and in which the warp threads constitute the opposite sides and base of the chenilles, coating the base of the chenilles with an adhesive and contacting the coated base with a support backing to bond the chenilles to the backing.

3. A process according to claim 1 in which the adhesive coating the parallel warp threads of the first sheet is of a vinyl resin base.

4. A process of manufacturing fabrics having a support backing and upstanding pile comprising forming a first sheet of adhesive coated parallel warp threads, placing on the first sheet a second sheet of uncoated pile threads parallel to each other and transverse to the warp threads,

pressing the threads of the second sheet against the threads of the first sheet to bond them together, cutting the threads of the second sheet between adjacent threads of the first sheet, bending the cut pile threads into U-shape about the Warp threads to form a sheet of parallel chenilles in which the free ends of all of the pile threads extend from the same side of the sheet of chenilles and in which the warp threads constitute the opposite side and base of the chenilles, coating the base of the chenilles with an adhesive and contacting the coated base with a support backing formed of a sheet of non-vulcanized rubber, the surface of which is coated with a softening solvent to give it an adhesive power and effectively bond the base of the chenilles to the backing.

5. A process of manufacturing fabrics having a support backing and upstanding pile comprising forming a first sheet of adhesive coated parallel warp threads, placing on the first sheet a second sheet of uncoated pile threads parallel to each other and transverse to the warp threads, pressing the threads of the second sheet against the threads of the first sheet to bond them together, cutting the threads of the second sheet between adjacent threads of the first sheet, bending the cut pile threads into U-shape about the warp threads to form a sheet of parallel chenilles in which the free ends of all of the pile threads extend from the same side of the sheet of chenilles and in which the warp threads constitute theopposite side and base of the chenilles, coating the base of the chenilles with an adhesive and contacting the coated base with a support backing formed of a sheet of synthetic resin to bond the base of the chenilles to the backing.

GEORGES C. AHIER.

ALFRED V. CHAMPAGNAT.

JEAN F. M. TIRMONT.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 1,745,724 Snelling Feb. 4, 1930 1,753,806 Ross Apr. 8, 1930 1,769,970 Silverman July 8, 1930 1,889,733 Unger- Nov. 29, 1932 2,005,049 Romane June 18, 1935 2,188,156 Plass Jan. 23, 1940 2,317,595 Faris Apr. 27, 1943 2,358,204 Bird Sept. 12, 1944 2,475,019 Faris July 5, 1949

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1745724 *Sep 28, 1925Feb 4, 1930Snelling Walter OFur skin
US1753806 *Jun 27, 1929Apr 8, 1930Ross Edward AProcess for making laminated fabric
US1769970 *Jun 21, 1929Jul 8, 1930Rosenau & Co Inc SChenille and method of making the same
US1889733 *Sep 13, 1932Nov 29, 1932Concord Chenille Company IncProcess of making fabrics
US2005049 *Feb 10, 1934Jun 18, 1935Georges RomaneApparatus for making imitation astrakhan fur
US2188156 *Aug 8, 1939Jan 23, 1940Robert H PlassApparatus for mounting fur upon a carrier sheet
US2317595 *Aug 1, 1941Apr 27, 1943Nat Automotive Fibres IncCarpet
US2358204 *Feb 27, 1943Sep 12, 1944Collins & Aikman CorpMethod of making pile fabrics
US2475019 *Jun 10, 1944Jul 5, 1949ProdescoProcess of making pile yarns and fabrics
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2787571 *Jul 14, 1954Apr 2, 1957Mohasco Ind IncMethod of making non-woven pile fabric
US2896304 *Dec 4, 1953Jul 28, 1959Carlo PeroniProcess for obtaining a velvet-like coating or covering material
US5804008 *Aug 27, 1997Sep 8, 1998E. I. Du Pont De Nemours And CompanyMethod and apparatus for making a tuftstring carpet
US5906877 *Mar 5, 1996May 25, 1999E. I. Du Pont De Nemours & Co.Moisture stable tuftstring carpet
US6720058Dec 1, 1998Apr 13, 2004E.I. Du Pont De Nemours And CompanyVelour-like pile articles and pile surface structures and methods of making
USRE36372 *Nov 26, 1997Nov 2, 1999E. I. Du Pont De Nemours And CompanyMethod and apparatus for making a pile article and the products thereof
EP1357220A1 *Dec 1, 1998Oct 29, 2003E.I. Du Pont De Nemours And CompanyVelour-like pile articles and pile surface structures and methods of making
WO1997006004A1 *Aug 6, 1996Feb 20, 1997Du PontMoisture stable tuftstring carpet
WO1999029949A1 *Dec 1, 1998Jun 17, 1999Du PontVelour-like pile articles and pile surface structures and methods of making
Classifications
U.S. Classification156/178, 156/435, 139/392, 28/162, 156/250
International ClassificationD04H11/00
Cooperative ClassificationD04H11/00
European ClassificationD04H11/00