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Publication numberUS2603071 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 15, 1952
Filing dateJul 7, 1950
Priority dateJul 7, 1950
Publication numberUS 2603071 A, US 2603071A, US-A-2603071, US2603071 A, US2603071A
InventorsKalhoefer Thelma E
Original AssigneeKalhoefer Thelma E
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Portable electric refrigerator
US 2603071 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

y 1952 T. E. KALHOEFER 2,603,071

PORTABLE ELECTRIC REFRIGERATOR Filed July 7, 1950 i 2 SI'IEETS-SHEET l IN VEN TOR. 77/51. M14 5. K44 HOE/18,

July 15, 1952 1'. E. KALHOEFER PORTABLE ELECTRIC REFRIGERATOR 2 Sl-XEETS-ShEET 2 Filed July 7, 1950 INVENTOR. THELMfl E KAAHOEFEIG,

14 TI OIQ/VEYS Patented July 15, 1952 UNITED STA ES TENT OFFICE.

2,603,071 PORTABLE ELECTRIC REFRIGERATOR:

Thelma E. Kalhoefer, Bowie, Tex, Application July '2, 1950, Serial N0.'1 72,467'

3 Ciaims. 1

This invention relates to a refrigeration device, and more particularly to a portable electric refrigerator.

An object ofthis invention is to providea refrigeration device which is particularly adapted for use in automobiles for storage of foodstuffs or beverages while traveling.

Another object of this invention is to-provide a refrigeration device whichis particularly adapted for operation from the electric system ofa motor vehicle.

A further object of this invention is to provide a portable electric refrigerator which is provided with suitable insulation to thereby e'fiectively decrease the power consumption of the device.

A still further object of this invention is to provide a portable electric refrigerator which can be thermostatically controlled.

A still further object of this invention is to provide a portable electric refrigerator which is relatively simple in structure andcheap to manufacture.

The above and still further objects and advantages of this invention will become apparent upon consideration of the following detailed description of' the invention, when taken in conjunction with the drawings, wherein:

Figure l is a top plan view of the portable electric refrigerator of the present invention;

Figure 2 is a side elevational view of the portable electric refrigerator of the present invention taken from the front of Figure 1;

Figure 3 is a sectional view taken along the line 3-3' of Figure 2;

Figure 4' is an enlarged fragmentary sectional view taken along the line 4-4 of Figure 1;

Figure 5 is a sectional view taken along the line 5'--5 of Figure 2;

Figure 6 is an enlarged fagmentary sectional view showing a part of the coil structure for the passage therethrough of the refrigerant;

Figure '7 is an enlarged'fragmentary sectional view-taken along the line 1-1 of Figure 5;

Figure 8 is an enlargedfragmentary sectional View taken along the line 8-8 of Figure 2; and

Figure 9 is an enlarged fragmentary sectional view taken along the line 9-9 of Figure 2.

Referring now more particularly to the drawings, wherein like reference numerals have been used throughout the several views to designate like parts, there is shown the portable electric refrigerator of the present invention, generally designated by the reference numeral H), which embodies anouter casing =|i having a closed bottom 12 andan' open top.

Disposed within the outer casing it and-supported in the latter is an inner casing l3 having a closed bottom I4- and an open topythe inner casing being supported in spaced relation with 'respect to the outer casing, to thereby provide an casing H and the closed bottom l4- of-the inner casing 13 is a second spacer-ring |8.- As cIearly shown in Figures 4' and 7, the spacer ringll is provided with a plurality ofapertures, gener ally designated by thereference numeral H). The spacer ring t8 issimilarlyprovided; with aper-I tures, not'shown, the aforementioned apertures cooperating to maintain the adjacent portions ofthe dead air space I 5 in communication witheach other.

Disposed within the dead air space l5: in abutting relation with the adjacent face-of the outer casing ll isan insulating sleevelfl. since the inner casing [3 has its bounding Wall contiguous to a dead: air space, and the bounding wallof the outer casing vII is insulated, itis apparent that little "heat will. pass through the walls of therefrigerator IO- of the present invention. I

Disposed in bridging relation with respect to the open topof the inner-and'outer casings- I 3, H is a cover 2| which is mounted bymeans of the hinge 22 for pivotal-movement out of its positionof bridging relation with respect to the open top" of the refrigerator l0.

, Disposed exteriorly of the outer casing H and supported on the latter is a latch, generally des ignatedbythe reference numeral 23' which is engageable withthe cover- 2 I for detachably-secuing the latter in the position ofbridging relation;-

Extending transversely of the outer casing =H,

andsecured exteriorly-the'reof is a supportingbas'e 24. Positioned upon the supporting base 24' and secured thereon is a electrically operable refrigeration unit of the direct expansion-type, generally designated by the reference numeral 26, which" embodies a compressor 21, a condenserkiii; a float chamber 29, and a motor 30' coupled to the compressor 21.

Circumposed about the innercasing, Wand positioned within the deadairspace I5 is arefrigerant-circulating means, generally designated by the reference numeral 3! which has one end in communication with the high pressure side of the refrigeration unit 26 by means of the conduit 32, and has its other end connected to the low pressure side by means of the conduit 33. The refrigerant-circulating means embodies a strip 34 channel-like in cross-section wound about the inner casing l3 with its open side facing the latter and secured thereto and cooperating with the adjacent portion of said inner casing to provide a continuous passageway for the refrigerant.

Accordingly, the refrigerantcan-pass from the high pressure side of the refrigeration unit 26 into the upper end of the refrigerant-circulating coil, downwardly through the coil, and back into the low pressure side of the refrigeration unit.

circumposed about the refrigeration unit 26 and detachably secured to the outer casing I I is a protectivehood 35. The hood 35 is provided with a plurality of apertures, generally designated bythe reference numeral 36, for the circulation therethrough of air to maintain the refrigeration unit 25, at a, temperature relatively close to that of the surroundings. The hood 35 has its upper end 31 abutting against the wall of the outer casing H, as clearly shown in Figure 9, and detachably secured thereto by means ofa threaded nut 38 and a bolt 39 circumposed about the nut and bearing against the hood. As clearly shown in Figure 8, the base 24 is provided witha longitudinally extending notch 43 for embracingly receiving and supporting the lower end of the hood 35.

. Disposed contiguousto the bottom of the inner casing I3 is a Y thermoresponsive element H which forms ,a part of a thermocontrol, generally designated by the reference numeral 42. Thethermocontrol is operatively connected to the motor 30 by means of the connecting wires 43, Figure 3, and control the motor in response tothe-temperature'of the inner casing l3. The thermocontrol 42 is provided with a pointer 44 which isdisposed exteriorly of the hood 35 and supported onthe latter, the'pointer cooperatiHEfWithfGhBddjLCfiIil; numerical indicia to give a, visual indication of. the setting of the thermocontrol. As clearly shown in Figure 5, the thermoresponsiveelement M of the thermocontrol #2 is insulated-from the dead air space l by the insulating sleeve 45..which is circumposed about the portionyof the element M which extends transversely through the dead air space l5, Accordingly, the thermocontrol 42 will permit an accurate and speedy control of the tem-- perature within thecasing l3.

Dependingly supported from the inner face of the cover 4| is an annular flange 46. Abuttin against the under surface of the cover 2i and supported within the flange "at is an insulating disc 4] which cooperates with the dead air space l5 and the insulating sleeve 20 to maintain the interior of the inner casing l3 relatively proof against the-temperature of the-surroundings of the refrigerator iii. Circumposed about the flange 46 is, a gasket E8, the gasket being fiexdly secured tothe flange 46 and bearing against the adjacent portions of the inner container I3, as clearlyshown in Figure 4, to form a relatively air-tight seal between the cover 2| and the casing.

Exteriorly of the outer casing ii there is prodes. pai 191 r eseit edles e i nat b the reference numerals 49, 50, which permit the refrigerator to be manually grasped, lifted, and transported from place to place.

Drain tube 52 leads from the bottom of the inner casing is, across the dead-air space l5, and through the side wall of the outer casing H and is provided with a removable drain plug 53 in its outer end.

In actual use, the motor 30 of the refrigeration unit 26 can be connected to any source of electrical energy, such as the electrical system of a motor vehicle, or a small storage battery, to be actuated thereby. The thermoresponsive control 42 is then set at the desired temperature and the refrigeration unit 26 operates to circulate a refrigerant through the circulating coil 34. The device is then ready for the accommodation of foodstuffs or beverages.

From the foregoing, it is readily apparent that the refrigerator of the present invention is particularly adapted for use in automobiles for traveling, or for picnics or the like, where it is desired to keep food and other produce at temperatures well below that of the surrounding atmosphere.

Although only one embodiment of the device of the present invention has been described, it is readily apparent that numerous modifications can be made without departing from the spirit of the invention as set forth in the appended claims.

What I claim is:

1. In a portable refrigerator, an outer casin having a closed bottom and an open upper end, an inner casing, a cover for the open upper end of the inner casing, said inner casing being concentrically spaced within said outer container to define a dead-air space therebetween, said air space entirely surrounding said inner casing, said inner casing having a closed bottom, a first spacer ring spacing the bottom of the inner casing upwardly from the bottom of the outer casing, a second spacer ring spacing the side wall of the inner casing from the side wall of the outer casing, said second spacer ring being located at a point intermediate the upper and lower ends of said dead-air space and being formed with perforations, means extending between the side walls of the inner and outer casings at their upper ends and closing the upper end of said dead-air space, a refrigerant conduit surrounding and in contact with said inner casing at a point below said second spacer ring in said dead-air space, and a refrigerating unit mounted on the exterior of said outer casing and effectively connected to said refrigerant conduit.

2. In a portable refrigerator, an outer casing having a closed bottom and an open upper end, an inner casing, a cover for the open upper end of the inner casing, said inner casing being concentrically spaced within said outer container to define a dead-air space therebetween, said air space entirely surrounding said inner casing, said inner casing having a closed bottom, a first spacer ring spacing the bottom of the inner casing upwardly from the bottom of the outer casing, a second spacer ring spacing the side wall of the inner casing from the side wall of the outer casing, said second spacer ring being located at a point intermediate the upper and lower ends of said dead-air space and being formed with perforations, means extending between the side walls of the inner and outer casings at their upper ends and closing the upper end of said dead-air space, a refrigerant conduit surrounding and in contact with said inner casing ata point below said second spacer ring in said dead-air space, and a refrigerating unit mounted on the exterior of said outer casing and efiectively connected to said refrigerant conduit, said unit comprising a base fixed on the lower part of and projecting laterally from said outer casing, said base being formed in its upper surface with a slot, and a removable hood having a depending lower flange engageable in the slot and an upper flange arranged to engage the exterior of the outer casing side wall at a point spaced above said base, and means removably securing the upper fiange in place on the outer casing side wall.

3. In a portable refrigerator, an outer casing having a closed bottom and an open upper end, an inner casing, a cover for the open upper end of the inner casing, said inner casing being concentrically spaced within said outer container to define a dead-air space therebetween, said air space entirely surrounding said inner casing, said inner casing having a closed bottom, a first spacer ring spacing the bottom of the inner casing upwardly from the bottom of the outer casing, a second spacer ring spacing the side wall of the inner casing from the side wall of the outer casing, said second spacer ring being located at a point intermediate the upper and lower ends of said dead-air space and being formed with perforations, means extending between the side walls of the inner and outer casings at their upper ends and closing the upper end of said dead-air space, a refrigerant conduit surrounding and in contact with said inner casing at a point below said second spacer ring in said dead-air space, and a refrigerating unit mounted on the exterior of said outer casing and eifectively connected to said refrigerant conduit, said unit having a thermal control element having a portion extending through the side walls of the outer and inner casings and exposed within the lower part of said inner casing.

THELMA E. KALHOEFER;

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1660184 *Nov 19, 1923Feb 21, 1928Whitehead Thomas CCooling system for refrigerating apparatus
US1796907 *Sep 10, 1924Mar 17, 1931American Patents Dev CorpRefrigerating apparatus and method
US1973880 *Jul 15, 1931Sep 18, 1934Reynolds Res CorpInsulating unit
US2226444 *Oct 28, 1939Dec 24, 1940Hussmann Ligonier CompanyCondensing unit
US2230862 *Jun 16, 1934Feb 4, 1941 Cooler apparatus
US2432042 *Oct 15, 1945Dec 2, 1947Seeger Refrigerator CoRefrigerator cabinet construction having means to restrict moisture in the walls of the cabinet
US2462115 *Jun 10, 1946Feb 22, 1949Harry F LueckeFreezing cabinet with refrigerating removable unit
US2493488 *Mar 21, 1945Jan 3, 1950Liquid Carbonic CorpTwo temperature refrigerator, including a humidity control system
US2502663 *May 12, 1944Apr 4, 1950Willard L MorrisonRefrigerant control system
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3747364 *Jul 12, 1971Jul 24, 1973Laing NikolausNew freezing chamber with refrigeration storage
US6269653Oct 4, 1999Aug 7, 2001Katu{Haeck Over (S)}A NikolaPortable device for refrigerating beverages
Classifications
U.S. Classification62/229, 62/457.9, 62/451, 62/523
International ClassificationF25D23/06, F25D11/00
Cooperative ClassificationF25D23/061, F25D11/00
European ClassificationF25D11/00