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Publication numberUS2605823 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 5, 1952
Filing dateMar 4, 1949
Priority dateMar 4, 1949
Publication numberUS 2605823 A, US 2605823A, US-A-2605823, US2605823 A, US2605823A
InventorsLockhart Hughbert M
Original AssigneeLockhart Hughbert M
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Roller screen
US 2605823 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

H. M. LOCKHART ROLLER SCREEN v 2 sfmETsf-SHEET 1 Filed March 4, 1949 JN V EN TOR.

jug. 5,

H. M. LOCKHART ROLLER SCREEN Filed March 4 1949 2 SI-iEETS--Sl-IEET 2 ATToRA/EY.

.Patented Aug. 5, 1952 UNITED STATES PATENT `OFFICE f 'Y I 2,605,823 y' c ROLLER SCREEN Hughhert M. Lockhart, Highland Parli,V Mich. Application'Mareh 4, 1949, serialA No. 79,630 Y My invention relates to a new anduseful improvement in a roller screen adapted 'for mounting on a window and so` constructed and `arrangedthat asthesash of the window is moved from closed' position Ythe screen 'will-'be unrolledscreen will vbe prevented should the sash, in moving from closed to open position, become cocked to one side or moved out of its, normal position.

Another object` of Athe invention is' theV provision, in a roller screen of this type, of a housing so constructed and arranged as to maintain the screen in close .engagement with an *abuttingl member so as to form a tight connection.v

Other objects willappear hereinafter.

It is recognized that various modifications and changes may be made in the detail of structure illustrated without: departing from' the invention, and it is intended that such'shall be embraced within the scope. of the claimswhich Vform a part hereof. v lf Forming a partyof Vthis specification are drawings'in which: i y

Fig. 1 is a perspective view of a window showing theinvention applied, f f

Fig, 2 is anelevational view-of a window shown infragment, illustrating the invention applied,

Fig;v '3 is an; enlarged sectional View taken on line '3-3 of'Fg. 2. f

Fig. 4 is an elevational View of the invention showing it appliedto a window illustratedin fragment, with a part of the invention broken away A Fig. 5 is a fragmentary sectional view .taken on line5-5ofFig.2,-m

Fig. 6 is an enlarged-,sectional viewtaken on lineI-46ofFig.2,j` f -'1:

Fig. 7 is ajviewjtakenon liner'I-l of Fig; 5, with parts broken away. K l jv l v In the drawings I have illustrated the invention used with a window which is mounted in a Window frame embodying the sides 9 and I0, the

top I I, and the bottom I2. Slidably mountedrin this window/frame is a pair of window sashes,

each having apaneof glass I4 and I 5, oneuof thesesashes being therupper and the Aother being the lower... 'Ihelower one is'indicatedashaving a bottom rail I6 andfsidgrails Ilf'anl I ,8, 'Y The l against the face' of the member I2.

side rails of the sashes slide between the stops I3, which are mounted on the inner face of the sides 9 andr Ilof the frame. Mounted on a pair offthese stops I3 at the `lower Aportion thereof are metal strips embodying 'a portion I9 which is nailed or otherwise suitably secured to the stops I3 and an ang'ularly turnedportion 20 which is extended tozoverlie the side rails I'I and I8, these metallic strips being L-shaped.

I provide an enclosing housing for the roller embodying the outer Wall 2|, a top wall 22, and an inwardlyturned flange 23 extending downwardly from the top wall. 'I-he bottom wall 2li, which is turned inwardly from the front wall 2l, is provided with the upwardly turned flange 25. At opposite ends of the structure I provide an end wall 26 having the inwardly directed tongues 2l which are secured to the top and bottom walls 22 and 24 respectively by means of screws 28. As shown in v`.Eig. 5, these end Walls 26 are of greater width than the depth ofthe housing so that the end walls project beyond the edges of the top wall and bottom wall. g e

Mounted within the housing is a roller 3| having the trunnions 3Ia projecting outwardly from opposite sides and engaging the end walls of the housing. -This roller isof the spring-operated type such as theordinaryshade roller, and a detailedconstruction of the spring arrangement is not deemed necessary. The spring ,is used for windingthe flexible member on the roller in the manner ofthe ordinary shade roller, excepting that the ratchet mechanism ofl the ordinary shade roller is eliminated, so that the spring of the rollerr usedmaintains constant tension on the screen. In this manner, lthe screen which is wound upon the roller is always kept Istretched taut. u Secured at oneend to the roller 3| and adapted for winding thereon is a liexible screen 32. On the free edge of this screen 32 is clamped a reenforcing strip, whichlis rigid and preferably formed ,from metal and which comprises the clamping brace 33 engaging at opposite sides of the screen and angularly turned, doubled over e portion 34,' to provvide a strip for slipping under the springclip`35', which is offset from rthe bottom I 2 of the frame and has a portion 31 suitably secured vto this fbottom I2 ofthe'frame. The

construction'is Asuch 'that wheny the reenfrcing strip. onv the screenl32 is inserted beneath the springportio ,3 5which'has the upwardly turned clamp. "36, kthe r'eeforcing. strip is held Y rmly Mounted on the sash rail I6, on vthe-interior thereof, is a plate,.3l8, the upper portion 39 of which is outwardly offset. This outward oisetting is so formed that there is provided a curved shoulder or curvilinear portion 4B, against which the edge of the flange 23 rests.

Mounted on the bottom of the bottom rail 42 of the upper sash and projecting inwardly so as to engage the face of the window glass I5, is a strip il of suitable flexible material such as rubber, and which extends for the full width of .the glass l5. This construction is' such thatwhen the lower sash is raised as shown in Fig. 3, the space between the pane of glass I4 and the rail 42 will be closed so that the entry of nies into this space is prevented.

In use the structure is mounted n the window as indicated, and when the lower sash is raised, the screen will be unwound from the roller; and when the lower sash is lowered, the screen will wind onto the roller. The metallic members 253 will always overlieY the edges of the screen, and this screen will be kept in contact with these edges, as clearly indicated. As 'clearly show-nA in Eig. 6, the structure has a clearance Va-topposite sides so that it may be used for :windows of various widths within certain limitations. Should the lower sash become cocked or-twisted out of its normal position so thatthe rail I6 will not be in horizontal position as shown'inFig. `Ll, the housing will still remain in horizontal position, as this housing will rock on the curved shoulder 45. Frequently the window becomes twisted so that the lower rail is not horizontal when the sash is raised, and when this is effected and the housing mounted fixedly o n the lower rail i6., therewould be a buckling or wrinkling of the screen at one of its side edges, while the other side edge would lie tight againstthe `mernberZll.A To avoid this,

the rockable mountingof the housing is resorted to.

In Fig. 4 the sash is indicated in full llines as being twisted out of its normal position so that the rail I6 does Vnot extend horizontal to the sill I2. Its normal position, in which theiail I6 is horizontal to the sill l2, -is indicated by rdotted lines.

As the window is loweredy and raised, the edges of the side walls 2E willride along the plates 2B. As clearly shown in Fig. 5, the clearance between these wear plates 28 and the upwardly curled edge of the lower wall 24 is the thickness of the screen, so that the screen is Vthus kept in close contact with the surfaces o f the wear -plates 2B. Moreover, by having the bottom 24 curled up-v wardly as at 25, a round surface over which the screen rides is provided, thus avoiding any undue wear on the screen when the raising andlowering is effected.

adapted for use with a window sash slidable in a Window frame and having a rail extending transversely of said frame, a housing; a roller screen mounted in said housing; attachment members for attaching one end of said screen to said frame for securing said screen and unrolling the same upon movement of said sash in one direction relatively to said frame; and a supporting memberon said sash forasupporting said housing, 4said housingA being longitudinally tiltable on said supporting member relatively to said sash.

y 2..In a roller screen of the class described, adapted for use with a window sash slidably mounted in a window frame and having a rail extending transversely of said frame, a housing having a front wall, a top wall, and a bottom wall; an end wall at eachend of said housing, said end walls projecting rearwardly beyond the edges of said top wall and bottom wall substantially the thickness of a screen used; a roller mounted upon and-extendingbetween vsaid end wallsand cone tained 'within-said housing and extending substantially from end to end thereof; a plate mount ed on opposite sides of the window frame and pro-V jecting inwardly beyond the ends of said housing; a screen windable on said roller and extending substantially from end to end thereof and adapted for attachment at its outer yend to said frame; a supporting member on said sash Vfor supporting said housing thereon, said housing Vmoving up-V wardly and downwardly with said rail and said end-walls, at the-edges of their projecting portions, engaging said plates in slidable movement of said window sashand said screen engaging at one ofl its faces withsaid plates.

3. In a roller screen of the class described, adapted for `use with a window sash slidably mounted in a window frame and havinga rail extending transversely of said frame, a housing having a front wall, a top wall, and a bottom wall; an end wall at each end of said housing, said end walls projecting-rearwardly beyond the -edges of said top wall and bottom wall;` a roller mounted uponvand extending between said end walls and contained within said housing; a'plate mounted on opposite sides of the window frame and proj ecting inwardly beyond the ends of said housing; a screen windable on said roller; an attachment means for attaching the outer end of said screen to said frame; a .supporting member carried'by said sash for supporting said housing thereon, said housing moving upwardly and downwardly with said rail and said end walls engaging :said plate in slidable movement of said window sash, said A roller screen of this class has proven most k efficient, and it is believed obvious that the housing may be easily andquickly mounted on the lower rail of the sash Hi and easily and quickly attached to and detached from the sill or lower portion of the frame.

Formedin one edge of theside walls 25 is a notch 2S in which the edge ofthe reenforcing strip engages, so as to prevent this strip from being rolled into the housing when the screen is loose from the sill and wound on the roll.V This also leaves the Astrip accessible for unwinding the screen and also prevents binding of the reenforcing strip on ,the window frame when `thewindow is raised or lowered while the screen is detached from the sill. v

What I claim is: y

1. In a roller screen of the class described,

housing being mounted on la transverse axis and rockable relatively to said rail when mounted on said sash.

4. In a roller screen of the class described,A

adapted for use with a window sash slidably mounted in a window frame and having a rail ex-l tending transversely of said frame, a housing having a front wall, a top wall, anda bottom wall; and end wall at each end of said housing, said end Walls projecting rearwardly beyond Vthe Aedges of said Ytop wall and bottom wall; a rollermounted upon and extending between said end Walls and contained within said'housing; a plate mounted on opposite sides of the window rframe and projecting inwardly beyond the ends of said housing;

Va Vscreenwindable onsaid roller; an'attachment means for attaching the outer end of said screenA to said frame; al Supporting member carried by said sash for supportingV said 4,housing thereon,

said housing moving 'upwardly and .downwardly with said rail and said end walls engaging said plate in slidable movement of said Window sash, said housing being mounted on a transverse axis and rockable thereon relatively to said rail when mounted on said sash, the opposite edges of said screen overlying said plate.

5. In a roller screen of the class described, adapted for use with a window sash slidably mounted in a Window frame and provided with a rail extending transversely of the frame, a housing; a roller mounted in said housing; a screen member windable upon said roller; attachment members for attaching the outer edge of said screen member to a stationary body; a supporting member on said rail for supporting said housing thereon, said supporting member having a curvilinear portion upon Which said housing may rock, said housing being movable in unison with said sash.

6. In a roller screen of the class described adapted for use with a Window sash slidably mounted in a Window frame and said sash having a rail extending transversely of said frame; a

HUGHBERT M. LOCKHART.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the le of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 525,381 Abbott Sept. 4, 1894 611,924 Monroe Oct. 4, 1898 822,948 Holden June 12, 1906

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US525381 *Dec 13, 1893Sep 4, 1894 Window-screen
US611924 *Aug 30, 1897Oct 4, 1898 Window-screen
US822948 *Sep 14, 1905Jun 12, 1906Merritt And CompanyWindow-screen.
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2825400 *Feb 5, 1954Mar 4, 1958Poulsen Ralph ECombination window and screen
US4732201 *Jun 12, 1986Mar 22, 1988Manfred DillitzerRoller blinds
US4862942 *Feb 29, 1988Sep 5, 1989Johnson Lance ARoller window screen
US6167936Sep 1, 1999Jan 2, 2001Jeffrey W. StoverWindow assembly having rolling window screen assembly
US6408922May 5, 1999Jun 25, 2002Don DesrochersSelf-supporting construction frame and methods of use thereof for the installation of doors and windows
US7594695Sep 25, 2007Sep 29, 2009Mark NoonanApparatus and methods for covering outdoor patio furniture
US9022089 *May 19, 2014May 5, 2015William S. DauWindow with retractable barrier assembly
US20100229468 *May 25, 2010Sep 16, 2010Pella CorporationRetractable screen system providing a positioning force for a movable sash
WO1986007407A1 *Jun 12, 1986Dec 18, 1986Manfred DillitzerRoller blind
Classifications
U.S. Classification160/30
International ClassificationE06B9/52, E06B9/54
Cooperative ClassificationE06B9/54
European ClassificationE06B9/54