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Publication numberUS2605897 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 5, 1952
Filing dateOct 21, 1949
Priority dateOct 21, 1949
Publication numberUS 2605897 A, US 2605897A, US-A-2605897, US2605897 A, US2605897A
InventorsJohn B Rundle
Original AssigneeJohn B Rundle
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Package
US 2605897 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

J. B. RUNDLE Aug. 5, 1952 PACKAGE 2 SHEETSSHEET 1 Filed 001;. 21, 1949 INVENTOR. Jolm i fiunale HTTOP/VEY J. B. RUNDLE Aug. 5, 1952 PACKAGE 2 SHEETSSHEET 2 Filed 001;. 21, 1949 INVENTOR.

flrr'OR/VEY ?atented Aug. 5

UNITED. STAT Es PATENT. OFFICE-W ieAoKAGE 7 some. Bundle, New York, N. Y. staircases October 21, 1949, SeriaI'No. 122,659 7' t seats. crate-65$ t The present invention relates generallyto packaging and more particularly to anewmeans and method for packaging together a plurality of individual units or packages, for example,

packs of cigarettes. x v For purposes-of convenience of illustration and description the present invention will bereferred to chiefly in connection it-h its use for retaining 1 together several packsof' cigarettes. Itis-equally 9 tons are large and bulkyand do not fit conveniently into'a purchasers pocket. They are also objectionable to most'wholesalersor retailers'in connection with the use of state taxstamps that must be affixed, as requiredbylaw, individually to each and every package of cigarettes. In order to afiix thestamps awholesaler or retailer must open the carton, remove allthe packages from it, affiX the'stamps, replace the pack ages with the stamps thereon; and finally fit the tongue of the carton coverinto its opening order to close the package. The cartons are frequently mutilated and their sales value informing attractive displays is practically worthless. In addition, the tax affixingprocedure isfan extremely tedious and time consuming task. .If'it is at tempted to remedythe tax affixing problem by providing windows in'the cartons there generally results an even more unsightly carton; as well as requiring additional the window opening. v

While it is possible to sell theflpackages of cigarettes individually, instead of in cartons;-for sales purposes it is preferred to groupseveral-inmachinery to form '7 The cardividual packages together and sell them as' a rm unit." This is convenient and benefi'cialte the 1 purchaser and r V M "cigarettes as it increases their sales volume.

also is desired by the sellers of the While-the-wrapper or packaging means of the present invention'may be utilized to enclose any desired number of units or packages the grouping of five packs, where utilized with cigarettes, is very desirable from a merchandising viewpoint; a group of five packs makesa convenient package to handle and also is an excellent merchandising unit for bulk'sales.

The present invention aims to overcome the above and other difficulties or disadvantages-by providing new and improved means and method for retaining several articles; units jor' packages of cigarettes together;

'The invention further 55 contemplates the provision of such a retaining or packaging means-which, while retaining the several packs together as a unit, facilitatesapp-lication of tax stamps to each individual package of cigarettes. 'Ilie'present packaging means and method may be" formed by relativelysimple methods and machinery and may" be more-conveniently displayed on acounter than single packages of cigarettes or previous cartons of i ar tt s c 71;.

An object-of the present invention-is to provide new and improved means for-holding several individual articles or paekagesofcigarettes together as aunit; Y

Another object or the inventior-i is toprovide new and improved helding means for cigarette packages or other-objects which-may be readily separated from the objects or the individual cigarette packages Another object-ofthe inventionistq provide a new andimproved holderfor cigarette packages or the like which facilitates the affixingof stamps to the individual cigarette packages or the like. I

A further object of the invention is to provide an articleor cigarette package holding means which securely retainsthe articles orpackages against unintentional removal; 9

Still another-object of the invention-is to provide a new and-improvedmethod of applying the present holding means to cigarette packages or thelike. a. I

A still further object of the invention is to provide an improved and more convenient merchandising unit for a number" of articles,- for example five packs of cigarettes.

Other andfurther objects of the invention will be obvious upon an understandingof the illustrative embodiment about to be described, or

will be indicated in the appended claims, and various advantages not-referred to herein will occur to one skilled in the art upon employment of the invention in practice A preferred embodiment of the invention has been chosen for purposes 'otillustration and description and is shown; the accompanying drawings, forming apart-10f vthe specification,

wherein.

Fig. l is a perspective view showinga preferred embodiment of the invention; 1

Fig. 2 is a fragmentary perspective view illustrating more particularly a means for releasing articles or packages of cigarettes from the present. holding means;

Fig. 3 is a perspective. view illustrating the ap- Fig. 8 is a perspective view of a further form of the invention; and

Fig. 9 is a sectional view illustrating another form of the invention.

Referring more particularly to the embodi-f:

ment of Figs. 1 through 4, there is shown a pluof cigarettes so that they are tied together as a unit. The unit is in turn tied together or retained with the band 2 by the portion of the strip II which extends across and adheres to the overlapping band portions 4 and 5. Thus the packages of Fig. 1 are firmly held against unintentional removal out through the open top or bottom ends of the band 2.

Removal of the strip II, to free the cigarette packages is facilitated by the provision of a tearing strip or removable portion I9 shown in Figs. 1 and 4 extending longitudinally of the band or length of material 2. This tear strip I9 may be provided by spaced weakened zones, perforations, or score lines 20 and 2I. In order to release the cigarette packages one may grasp both the end 23 of the adhered strip II and the tab 24 of the tear strip I9 and simultaneously pull them outrality of packages I'of cigarettes, five to be exact;

encircled by a band or length of material 2. The length of material 2 extends entirely around the group of individual cigarette packages and has overlapping ends 4 and 5, preferably secured together by adhesive 1. The side edges of the band or length of material 2 are shown terminating adjacent side or end walls 8 of the cigarette packages, thus leaving these package walls 8 entirely exposed for the affixing of tax stamps I to any portion thereof. This is a decided advantage as the retailer or wholesaler is not limited to affixing the tax stamp in some relatively small area, with which the stamp must be accurately aligned.

ihe individual packages of; cigarettes shown in Figs. 1 through 4 are held together and retained with the length of material 2 by a strip I I having an adhesive surfacel3, shown in Fig. 4

extending around three sides I4, I5 and I6 of the cigarette package group. The strip I I may extend along the side or wall H of the cigarette package group, or it may extend only along sides I5 and I6, the desirable feature being that the adhesive surface I3 of the strip lies in contact with some port of each of the individual packages of cigarettes. The adhesive surface is preferably at only one side of the stripI I but it may be at both sides so that the strip, in addition to adhering at its inner surface, will alsoadhere to the overlying length of material'or band}. a

As shown, the strip I I extendsacross the overlapping portion 4 p of thelength of material 2 and adheres thereto. The overlying flap 5 covers the majority of this overlapping portion of the strip II and is retained in position against it by the adhesive I intermediate the two overlapping portions 4 and 5. p I

While any suitable material may be utilized for the strip II, as well as any suitable adhesive for its surface I3, excellent results have been obtained by utilizing a cellulose tape having a sticky, gummy, ortacky adhesive surface. Such materials are widely known and used. One example is that sold under the. name Scotch tape. This cellulose tape material has its adhesive surface integral with it at all times and is amply strong for all conditional or normal usage; as will be hereinafter brought out in greater detail, such an adhesive surface may be readily pulled away from the cellophane or other relatively glossy material which encloses the individual packages of cigarettes I.

When encircled by both the strip II and the length of material or band 2, each individual package of cigarettes is held firmly in position. The adhesive surfaces I3 of the band II contact in at least one location with .each package wardly away from the encircling band 2. The end 23 of the strip II may be folded upon itself as shown in Figs. 1,2 and 4 or it may be somewhat shorter and adhered along its length to the underlying portion of the band-2. As the strip II and tear strip I9 are thus simultaneously pulled in an outward manner away from the band 2 the adhesive I3 at the inner surface of the strip II releases or is pulled away from the underlying packages of cigarettes and the tear strip separates from the other portion of the band 2 along the weakened zones or lines 2!] and 2|. I If desired the tab24 and tear stripIQ may be first pulled away from the completed package and thereafter the tear strip II- separately pulled away, but for convenience it is preferredthat they both be pulled loose simultaneously.

After removal of the adhesive strip II the remaining upper and lowerportions 2'.and -2" tend to hold the packages l; tog ether. These upper and lower portions may be readily slipped off the ends of the cigarette packages o r other articles. If desired the tear striplfl may be located adjacent anupper or lower edge of the band 2,

. rather than intermediate its width. When so located adjacent one edge of the band 2, it is V necessary-to provide only a single weakened zone or score line, such as 20 or 2I depending upon whether the tearstrip I9 is located adjacent the upper or lower portion of the band 2;

'In order to form the complete group or package shown iii-Fig.1, the method illustrated in Fig. 5 may be employed... As there shown a group of cigarette packages or. other articles )is brought together with theladhe sively surfaced strip II and lengthof' materialorband'2 as they unwind from respective rolls, the adhesive surface I3 of the strip of material-II being disposed toward the package of cigarettes I. When thus brought together the strip II and band 2 may be simultaneously wrapped around the group of cigarette packages. Upon completion of this encirclement the-band 2 and-strip I I may be severed or cut off along a transversely extending line 26. Another method of packaging the individual cigarette packages 'isto firstapply the strip II around the -group of cigarette packages and to thereafter apply the outer length of material or band 2. Either method places the strip I I ar'ound the group of;-articles 'or cigarette packages I so as to hold them firmly together. The first "ofthe aforementioned methods of applying the strip I I and band 2 is preferred. v

In Fig. 6 there is shown a form of the invention generally similar to that of Figs. 1 through 4 but which has an adhesive strip or area. 28 carried by'theband 2a itself, rather than'ona "mesa contact with each article or package foi ci'garettes encircledorenclosedbythe band.

While the adhesive strip 28 may exten'd'along the entirelengthof the band 'Zait is preferably interrupted so that the adhesive portions contact only the narrow sideportions of each of the individual articles, rather; than the large end walls in addition This con truction is'effectlve to hold the cigarette packages or other articles under all normal conditions of usage. length of material or strip 2a may be supplied in rolls such as that shown in Fig. 5 and may be applied in a generally similar manner to groups of articles or cigarette packages.

The length of material or band 2a may be removed from its group of cigarette packages in a manner similar to that described in connection with Figs. 1 through 4, namely by gripping the tab 24a and pulling it away from the encircled cigarette packages. As the tear strip I90, is pulled away the adhesive areas 28 separate from the cellophane or other wrapper of the cigarette packages and upon completion of removal of the tearing strip 19a the cigarette packages may be readily removed.

The modified form of the invention illustrated in Fig. '7 has a removable portion or tear strip 29 which extends transversely of the encircling band, rather than longitudinally of it. After this tear strip is removed the resulting structure may be opened somewhat similarly to the leaves of a book and individual packages of cigarettes removed as desired. This construction embodies the advantage of leaving adhesive portions connected with areas of the cigarette packages lb subsequent to removal of the tearing strip 29. It thus retains them together as a unit until individually removed. The adhesive strip 28b of Fig. '7 is of the type illustrated in Fig. 6, which extends longitudinally around the band 22). It is to be understood, however, that there may be utilized a separate strip such as that designated by the reference character H in Figs. 1 through 4.

Anothermeans of retaining the packages of cigarettes within a surrounding or encircling band is indicated by the lines 3| of Fig. 8. The separate strip 3! is similar to the strip ll of Figs. 1-4 but extends around the exposed end portions around them within the confines of the enclosing length of material or band.

In Fig. 9 there is shown a modified form of the invention which utilized a spot or small area of adhesive 32 for retaining together adjacent portions of adjoining packages of cigarettes. An additional spot or area of adhesive 34 on an outwardly disposed portion of an outermost cigarette package serves to retain the group of cigarette packages together with the enclosing band 2c. The band 20 may have a transversely extending tear strip similar to that of Fig. "I.

The encircling lengths of material or bands of the cigarette packages rather than,

The

may be printed or lithographed with suitable advertising material prior to application to the cigarette packages. The bands may be printed or lithographed so as to simulate the exteriors of the packages of cigarettes which are to be encircled by the bands, so that the completed unit or package has the appearance of a group of cigarette packages standing next to each other. This appearance is greatly enhanced by the open end portions of the wrapper or band, which seat expbse'the cellophaneend wrappings or vi ualtqisaret er s ss- 1 ll be seen tliat the present invention-pronew' a mi rovedmeans and method of much more conor retailers in jconne'ction with, afii'xing tax stamps ,to each 'o'fi'the cigarettes?this'alone results in saving of considerable amounts of money. expended to performthis task." The shape and stability of the resulting completed unit' rendeniit'more adaptable to counter displays for increasing bulk or multiple package sales of cigarettes or other articles. The length of material or band, with either a separate adhesive strip or an integral one, may be applied with relatively simple machinery by utilizing the preferred relatively simple method disclosed herein. The individual package of cigarettes are firmly retained together as a unit until such time as a purchaser desires to remove them, at which time they may be readily released from the enclosing band by. merely pulling a tear strip.

As various changes may be made in the form, construction and arrangement of the parts herein without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention and without sacrificing any of its advantages, it is to be understood that an matter herein is to be interpreted as illustrative and not in a limiting sense.

Having thus described my invention, I claim:

1. A package of the class described comprising the combination of a plurality of packs of cigarettes disposed each in abutting relationship with another, a wrapper comprising a band encircling said packs and leaving at least one surface portion of each pack exposed, said wrapper being provided with at least a single zone of separation for guiding severing of a strip from said wrapper, said strip encircling the packs, and adhesive means intermediate said packs and said strip securing the packs together as a unit, said means and said strip being from said wrapper, said band being otherwise unattached to said packs, whereby upon removal of said strip and adhesive means the packs are free for removal from the remainder of said band.

2. A package of the class described comprising the combination of a plurality of packs of cigarettes disposed each in abutting relationship with another, a wrapper comprising a band encircling said packs and leaving at least one surface portion of each pack exposed, said wrapper being provided with at least a single zone of separation for guiding severing of a strip from said wrapper, said strip encircling the packs, and adhesive means carried by said strip and disposed intermediate said packs and said strip securing the packs together as a unit, said means and said strip being simultaneously removable from said wrapper, said band being otherwise unattached to said packs, whereby upon removal of said strip and adhesive means the packs are free for removal from the remainder of said band.

3. A package of the class described comprising the combination of a plurality of packs of cigarettes disposed each in abutting relationship with another, a wrapper comprising a band encircling said packs and leaving at least one surface portion of each pack exposed, said wrapper being provided with at least a single zone of separation for guiding severing of a strip from said wrapper,

individual packages of.

simultaneously removable said strip encircling the packs, and adhesive means comprising -a-leiigth' of material having an adhesive coating at one side thereof disposed intermediate said packs and said strip securing the 'packs together as af-unit', "said imeans. and said strip being simultaneously removable from said wrapper, said band being otherwise unattached to said packs, whereby upon removal of said strip and adhesive means thepacks are free for removal from the remainderof said band. 7

. o P 'JOHN BRUNDLE.

I ZREFiE RENC ES'CITED V {The following-- references, are of record in the filefof this .patentzym 7 i 8 1 UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Number

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Classifications
U.S. Classification206/264, 206/273
International ClassificationB65D75/58, B65D75/68, B65D71/00, B65D71/14
Cooperative ClassificationB65D2571/00987, B65D2571/00716, B65D75/68, B65D2571/00327, B65D2571/00567, B65D2571/0082, B65D71/14, B65D2571/0066, B65D2571/00141, B65D75/5844
European ClassificationB65D71/14, B65D75/68, B65D75/58E1B