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Publication numberUS2605931 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 5, 1952
Filing dateMar 17, 1949
Priority dateMar 17, 1949
Publication numberUS 2605931 A, US 2605931A, US-A-2605931, US2605931 A, US2605931A
InventorsBerni Louis W, Scannell Eustace S
Original AssigneeBerni Louis W, Scannell Eustace S
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Beverage control system and dispensing means
US 2605931 A
Abstract  available in
Images(4)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Aug. 5, 1952 s. SCANNELL ET AL BEVERAGE CONTROL SYSTEM AND DISPENSING MEANS 4 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed March 17, 1949 laws %flemw (1x g5.

g- 1952 E. s. SCANNELL ET AL 2,605,931

BEVERAGE CONTROL SYSTEM AND DISPENSING MEANS 4 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed March 17, 1949 unn- E. S. SCANNELL ET AL Aug. '5, 1952 BEVERAGE CONTROL SYSTEM AND DISPENSING MEANS 4 Sheets-Sheet 3 Filed March 17, 1949 INVENTOR-S' Aug. 5, 1952 Filed March 1'7,

E- S. SCANNELL ET AL BEVERAGE CONTROL SYSTEM AND DISPENSING MEANS 4 Sheets-Sheet 4 INVENTORS ZZSTACES Jean/Ms Patented Aug. 5, 1952 BEVERAGE CONTROL SYSTEM AND DISPENSING MEANS Eustace S Scannell, Boston, and Louis W. Berni, East Boston, Mass.

Application March 17, 1949, Serial No. 81,944

11 Claims. 1

Our invention relates to a control system and dispensing means for use in the merchandising of bottled beverages in establishments serving a number of individual drinks from each bottle. It is designed, primarily, to provide management with a complete running inventory and check on the stock and disposition of bottled liquors.

The liquor control system in general use at present requires six books and entails a very considerable amount of bookkeeping. Our invention provides a greatly simplified accounting system in which only a single book of two'forms is employed, in connection with a register attached to each bottle from which drinks are dispensed.

An object of the invention is to provide an improved dispensing means attachable to a bottle to receive and subsequently discharge a predetermined measured quantity of the bottle contents.

Another object is to provide a bottle attachable dispensing container adapted for filling with a measured quantity of the bottle contents, and having manually controlled discharge means associated with means for registering th amount of contents dispensed.

Another object is to provide, in a dispensing register of the character stated, means rendering the register inoperative in the absence of a predetermined measured quantity of the bottle contents in the container.

Other objects will be apparent to those skilled in the art.

In the drawings:

Figure 1 is an elevation of our dispensing register sealed in service position in the neck of a bottle.

Figure 2 is substantially a central vertical section through the assembly of Figure 1.

Figure. 3 is a view similar to Figure 2, with the register and other details shown in elevation.

Figure 4 is substantially a central vertical section through Figure 3 viewed from the left thereof.

Figure 5 is a horizontal section taken substantially on the line 5-5 of Figure 3.

Figure 6 is a horizontal section taken sub stantially on the line 66 of'Figure 2.

- Figure 7 is a horizontal section taken on th line 7-! of Figure 3.

. Figure 8 is substantially an elevation of the interior of the device viewed from the rear side Withjrespect to Figure 3.

-Figure 9 is' substantially anaxial section through the dispenser in tilted discharge position; v .;:F. 11re;10 is a viewsubstantially similar to Figure 5, illustrating an alternative embodiment of means for preventing register operation unless a full charge of liquid is in the trap chamber.

Figure 11 is substantially a front elevation of the embodiment shown in Figure 10.

Figure 12 is an elevation, partly in section, of an alternative form of the bottle attaching means.

Viewed externally, asv in Figure 1, the dispensing register appears'as an irregular spheroid shell casing formed of two half-sections I0 and 10a. The edges of the halves meet in face contact over their full extent in a plane which intersects the longitudinal axis of the assembly. Securing means H bind the halves tightly together in detachably connected engagement. The outer end of the shell is pear shaped and closed to encompass a trap chamber I2 for receiving a charge of liquid to be dispensed. A discharge spout 13 in the form of a tube open at both ends is carried by one of the shell sections and extends through the section wall in sealed supported engagement therewith. The tube is inclined relative to the longitudinal axis of the shell and has internal guard means, not shown, for preventing the insertion of an opening tool without obstructing pouring.

The inner end of the shell is circular and open and is provided with an internal annular bead M which seats in a complemental receiving groove formed 'in the peripheral face of an annular mounting flange l5 integral with a bottle closure cap It; thus securely locking the cap and shell against relative axial movement. The cap has a depending skirt portion l1 adapted for detachable connection, here shown as a threaded engagement, with a bottle l8 in the usual manner of closure caps. In an alternative form, as shown in Figure 12 the closure has a conventional cork stopper ll.

A center section I9 is mounted within the shell between the trap chamber [2 and bottle cap IEi. This section is here shown as a block rectangular in cross section axially of the shell and rigidly secured at its base to the cap [5 by attaching elements'2ll headed in the body of the cap and threaded into laterally directed lugs t2! integral with the base of the block. The cross sectional area of the block is appreciably les than that of the portion of the shell in which it is located, and three side faces of. the block occupy planes parallel to its longitudinal axis. The fourth side face, on the left in Figures 2 and 3, is inclined outwardly toward the shell wall from the base of the block to its outer end, thereby providing a longitudinal progression in the cross sectional against relative axial movement. The head constitutes a partition between the liquid trap chamber I2 and the register mounting portion of the assembly, and the oval configuration of the shell and partition prevents relative twisting of the parts.

Both the cap closure I6 and center section block I9 are bored to establish liquid flow and air passage communication between the bottle interior and the trap chamber I2. A bore through the body of the block I3 substantially parallel to its inclined face opens to a registering aperture in the cap I6 and provides for, fiow of liquid from the. bottle into the chamber I2 when the bottle is inverted; A filter 26 is mounted in the cap aperture, and seats within the bore. Air passage between the interior of the bottle and the chamber I2 is accomplished through an air tube 21 passed through-the. body of the cap and press fitted in a receiving bore in the block. The lower end portion of, the air tube extends well into the bottle neck, and at its upper end the tube terminates flush with the planar bottom of a valve guide channel 28 which extends diametrically through the block head 22 across the tube end and the liquid flow bore 25. A reciprocable slide valve, is housed within the guide channel. The roof of the channel is apertured in alignment with the air, tube, and mounts in the aperture a tubularconduit 30 which projects a short distance into the chamber I2.

Normally the valve 291 is seated in retracted open position as shown in Figures .2, 3 and 6. In this position its rear edge abuts the shell casing wall and itsforward edge is retracted clear of the liquid flow bore 25. Also, in this position, a port 3| in the valve body registers with the air tube 21 and theconduit 30 to establish communication therebetween. When the valve is projected forwardly to closedposition, as shown in Figure 9, the port 3I is shifted laterally to cut off communication between the air tube and conduit, and the valve body moves entirely across the bore 25 to cut off the flow of liquid from the bottle to the trap chamber and vice versa.

Operating movement of the, valve 29 is effected by means of a lever 32 fulcrumed intermediate its ends on a pivot stud 33 on the center block I9 and extending laterally therefrom. The lever is formed with an. outwardly directed portion 34 coaxial with its pivot axis and which projects laterally through an aperture 35 in the wall of the shell. At theouter end of the portion 34 the lever is directed laterally to extend in spaced relation alongside the-bottle. I8 as a handle 36 offset with respect to they inner end portion of the lever housed within the shell. The terminal of this inner end portionhas pivotal connection with one. end of a link 31 that is pivotally connected at its other end to a stud 38 carried by and extending laterally from the rear end portion of the valve 29. The stud 38 also is pivotally connected .with one end of a forwardly directed link 39.which pivotally connects at its other end to a crank 40 fixed to one end of a shaft 4| journalled transversely through the block I9 beneath the slide valve. The other end of this shaft extends laterally from the block I9 and has fixed thereon a second crank 42 which is in pivotal end connection with a second link 43 that is pivotally connected at its other end to a fixed stud 44 on the slide valve. The stud 44 is coaxial with the stud 38; and the crank and linkage arrangement described is evenly balanced at opposite sides of the mounting block I9, thus assuring smooth operation of the slide valve in its guide channel.

The center section block I9 also mounts metering means operative by the slide valve 29 to register the number of drinks dispensed from the bottle. This means comprises a conventional assembly of a digit wheel 45 freely rotatable on one end of the shaft M in pawl and ratchet driving connection with a tens counter wheel 46 rotatable on a stub shaft 41 carried by the block. A pawl 48 pivoted on the slide valve stud 44 engages a ratchet on the-digit wheel 45 to rotate the wheel one step each time the valve 29- is actuated to close the liquid flow bore 25 when the container comprising the trap chamber I2 is filled. Numbers on the counter wheels are visible through sight apertures 49- in the shell wall. A leaf spring 50 suitably mounted on the block I9 is tensioned against-elements of the counter wheels to maintain their alignment and to prevent backward rotation.

Means are providedto render the register inoperative in the absence of a proper amount of liquid in the chamber I2. Normally, with the bottle in upright position, the slide valve actuated pawl 48 is held out of driving engagement with the digit wheel rack by the bias of an expansion spring 5I coiled about a float stem 52 mounted for reciprocatory movement in the closure cap I6 and through the partition head 22 of the center section block, At its upper end the stem 52 extends into the chamber I2 and carries a fioat 53, and at its lower end it is guided in a receiving socket 54 provided in the closure cap fiange I5. One end of the expansion spring 5| bears on the cap flange and the other end bears against a fixed abutment 55 carried by the float stem. An arm 56 extends laterally from the abutment 55 into operative connection with an apertured ear 5! that projects from a lug 58 depending from the pawl 48 forwardly of its point of connection with the slide valve stud on which it is pivotally mounted. The force of the spring 5I acting against the under face. of the stem abutment 55 lifts the arm 56; and through it the pawl 48, .and holds the pawl out of engagement with the rack of the digit wheel 45. When the bottle is inverted, liquid fills the trap chamber I2 and buoys the float 53 to move toward the partition 22. This movement is transmitted to the stem 52, which movesv at its lower end deeper into the socket 54, thus shifting the abutment 55 away from the partition 22- and pulling the pawl 48 into operative engagement with the rack of the digit counter wheel. The buoyant force of liquid rising in the trap chamber I2 when the bottle is inverted is suflicient to overcome the bias of the stem carried spring 5|.

The discharge spout I3 is controlled by a valve comprising a sleeve 59 closed at its inner endand telescoped over the inner end of the discharge spout. The sleeve has an internal diameter greater than the external diameter of the dis-- charge spout whereby to provide a clearance space between the'two. At its closed inner end .59 while the other end is curved to provide a cam portion 64. which projects through the partition head well into the liquid flow bore 25 in the path of movement of -the forward edge of the slide valve.'29. In the normal position of the parts, with the slide valve in retracted open position, the

lever 5| is held by a spring 65 so that its cam end-portion 64 is disposed in the path of movement of the slide valve 29 and its other end holds the discharge valve 60 closed against its seat in the end of the discharge tube. The spring 65 is mounted on the lever fulcrum pin between one of the lugs 63 and a head on the pin, and bears at its ends against the partition head and the lever.

In service, the dispensing register is attached to a bottle as described, with the air tube 21 extending well down into the bottle, and is sealed in position by an airtight band 66 of suitable plastic material, such as Celloseal, which has airtight and tamperproof connection as well as longitudinal anchorage with the external annular bead of the casing and the bead f the bottletop. With the bottle in upright position the slide valve 29 is held in open retracted position, as seen in Figure 2, by the bias of a retracting spring 61 connected between the arm of the lever 32 withing the shell and an attaching lug onthe closure cap flange 15, as in Figure 8. In thisposition of the lever its handle portion 36 is angled outwardly away from the bottle neck. When a drink is to be dispensed the bottle is inverted or tilted as shown in Figure 9, with thespout [3 in pouring position, whereupon liquid flows bygravity through the fiow bore 25 into the trap chamber 12 displacing air which passes through the conduit 30, slide valve port 3|, and tube 2'! to the interior of the bottle. During this operation the slide valve 29 remains open and the discharge valve '60 remains closed. Also, the register actuating pawl 48 is disengaged. v

Liquid from the bottle continues to fill the chamber l2 until the level rises sufficiently to close ofi the air conduit 30, at which point the liquid ceases tofiow as no more air can enter the bottle from the chamber. The liquid also rises above the inner end of the tube 13 and in the space between the discharge spout and the sleeve 59. At the same time, the rise of liquid within the trap chamber lifts the fioat 53 in the direction of the partition 22. Movement of the fioat correspondingly moves the stem 52 with its abutment 55 against the tension of the spring and shifts the arm 51 to pull the pawl 48 into driving engagement with the digit wheel rack. The trap chamber is now filled with a definite predetermined measure of the bottle contents ready to be dispensed. 7

Under these conditions, when the handle 36 is pulled in toward the bottle the linkage system previously described moves the slide valve 29 forwardly to cut off the liquid flow bore- 25 and also to blockcommunication between the air tube Hand air conduit 30'. Thus no air can enter the bottle interior and no liquid can flowfrom the bottle into the trap chamber. At the same time the forward edge of the slide valve engages the cam end 64 of the S-shaped lever fil and rocks the lever on its fulcrum to pull the valve 69 from its seat and open thedischarge spout. The sleeve 59 sets up a siphon action which empties the trap chamber contents through the discharge spout .to dispense one measured drink from the bottle. Air from the siphon action is supplied above the liquid in the trap chamber through a shallow air channel 58 in the partition abutting face of the slide valve 29. M This air channel opens at one end to therear edge of the slide valve and extends longitudinally of the valve a sufficient distance to dispose its other end in registry with the partition air conduit 30 when the slide valve is in projected closed position, as seen in Figure 9. Air supplied through the channel 68 enters the shell through the lever aperture 35, and through the sight apertures 49 unless they are covered by transparent window panels. As the slide valve, moves forward under actuation from the handle lever it carries with it the register actuating pawl 48 which rotates the digit wheel through one step to bring the appropriate number in alignment with its sight aperture in the shell. The digit wheel in turn drives the tens wheel in the conventional manner of counters. It is an important feature of our invention that the register cannot be actuated by operation of the slide valve unless and until the-proper measured quantity of liquid is present in the trapchamber l2. The bias of the spring holds the pawl 48 disengaged until it is overcome by movement of the trap chamber float.

At the conclusion of a dispensing operation the bottle is restored to upright position and the handle is released, whereupon the handle lever spring fi'l acts through the mechanism as described to return the parts to their original position. The upper face of the partition 22 is dished to 'alow point at the bore 25 so that com- ;plete drainage of the trap chamber is effected whenthe bottle is upright. If drinks are to be poured in 'quick succession from the same bottle, the bottle may be continued in its pouring position While the handle is released to permit reopening of the .slide valve and refilling of the trap chamber; I

In the normal upright position of a bottle with the dispensing register attached the discharge control valve 60 is held firmly in closed position. This prevents the entry of fruit flies and other insects; it also prevents evaporation of the bottle contents and refilling or adulteration. Another feature of the invention is the high degree of accuracy obtainable with regard to the exact quantity of liquid tobe delivered to the trap chamber at each filling. This is determined by the location of the air conduit 30; a deeper extension into the chamber makes the quantity delivered smaller, and a shorter extension makes the quantity larger.

Figures 10 and 11 illustrate another embodiment of the means for preventing operation of the register in the absence of a full charge of liquid in the trap chamber. In this embodiment, the float 53 and its associated stem 52, spring 5|, and arm 55 are eliminated, and theregister actuator pawl 48 is biased into driving. connection-with the register in a conventional manner; so that the registenis operated each time the slide valve 2'9-is moved-into closed position. Instead of the float 53 and its associated parts we employ a positive lock which holdsthe slide valve against closing at all times and in all positions of the assembly, except'when the trap chamber is fully charged with a predetermined proper quantity of liquid delivered from-thebottle.

The lock comprises a lever 69 pivotally connected at one end toa mount 10 fixed onthe flange 23 of the partition 22; This lever normally rests against and parallel to the face of the partition within the trap chamber at one side of the major axis of the partition. A rigid lock pin H fixed on the lever extends laterally therefrom into the mouth or the liquidflow bore 25 in the path inf-closing movement of the slidevalve 29-, where it functions as a stopmember that prevents closing of the slide valve. The lever 69 extends substantially midway across the-face of the'partition parallel to its major axis and, at its inner end, is provided with an enlargement l2 directed laterally toward the-casing wall. This enlarged portion extends beneath the bottom of a substantially rectangular float 13 that is pivotally connected to a stud -14 integral with the partition. Normally, in non-dispensing position of the parts, the float seats on the lever portion 12 and holds the lever against the face of the partition. The axis on which the float pivots is off center so that the major area of the float bottom overlies the lever portion 12 in the direction of the pivoted end of the lever and biases the float in holding engagement against the lever. The float also is biased by the provision of a weighted portion 15 along its side that is'disposed beyond the end of the lever and so arranged that when the device is in inverted position the float hangs from its pivot to override and hold the lock lever against the partition in the absence of a full measure of liquid inthe trap chamber.

When the assembly-is tilted to dispensing position liquid is delivered to the trap chamber through the flow bore 25. As the level rises within the chamber the float I3 is buoyed to swing on its pivot against the bias of its weight 15, which is overcome. This movement continues untilthe rising liquid closes off the airconduit 30, at which point the chamber is filled with the proper amount and-nomore liquid can flow from the bottle. Also at this point, the floatwill have swung sufficiently to permit the lever-69 to' drop away from the partition. farenough to remove the stop H fromthepathof travel of the-slide valve 29. As soon as the stop'll clearsthe sl-ide valve it maybe closed to out 01f theflow. bore, actuate the register, and open the dispensing outlet valve in the manner previously described herein.

In another aspect the invention is a dispensing meanspreventing actuation of the "register while the devloe oceupiesany position-other than that of tilt or inversion for pouring.

Ourdispen'sing' register forms partof an accounting system which makes use of a book of the looseleaf type having two forms. It has been detern ined; since-liquoris purchased at the bar bytype' a nd{brand, since it is requisitioned from stock for-the bar by type and brand, and'since it is purchase'd from the wholesaler by type and -brand,--that-theinve-ntoryshouldbe kept by type and brand; Accordingly, the two forms, designated A and B,-are kept for each type and brand.

'Form' A issl concerned with the'stockroom inventory; final-disposition andanalysis of bottled goods".- It 'is a print'ed formand is provided with headings denoted Brand, e, Size and Proof, whi'ch are necessary'fto establish identity of the produ'ctq The form also is provided with headin'gs denoted 'Wholesaler, Address, Serial Numbers-,-;Invo ice"l Ti1mberand Date. These tell the or-i'gin'of the merchandise. Other headings denoted Numberof Cases, Unit Value, Unit Price and- Invoice Amount are utilized to provide a quick survey :andthe necessary information for recording or analyzing the sales. Another heading denoted Number of Bottles is for the purpose of a running inventory. The form also is provided with columns across the chart headed, respectively, Date, Bar, Bar, Bar, Special, Total Issued;Numberof Bottles on-Hand and Remarks. These 'columns' are all given a general heading entitled Issues;- Theback of the form contains an analysis chart having a number of columns headed respectively, Disposition, Number of Bot tles, Invoice Price, a Value, Estimated Spread, Actual'Return, Actual Spread and Remarks. Underthe heading-D'isposition the columns contain subtitleswhich are Purchased, Sold--Bar, Bar, Bar, Charged Off.

When liquor is received from the wholesaler a Form A is made out for each type and brand. When the stock is issued to the bar, a notation of the number'of bottles is made on Form A against the proper date, under the Issue column designating the particular bar. This Bar column is madepurposely large so that subsequent entries on the same date may be added: 2 & 2 & 3. The-columns Special and Remarks are meant to take care of any disposal of merchandise out of'the usual procedure, such as through breakage, spoilage, leakage, gratuities or seizure by government ofiicers. In the Special column is placed the number of bottles, and in the Remarks column is placed the explanation. At the end of the day, the total issuances, including those of the Special column, are recorded in the Total Issued column for the day. This figure is subtracted from the previous days entry under N0. of Bottles on Hand column to give the present days entry in this column. The Remarks column highlights allirregularities. By comparing the issues from day to day, the proprietor will be able to notice instantly any unreasonable fluctuation as is sometimes caused by salesmen and missionary men, etc.

Every bottle issued to the bar is opened by the steward and a dispensing register as previously described is afllxed to the bottle. Each register is provided with a serial number by using letters of the alphabet instead of numerals so that a spread of 26 characters instead of 10 is given in each integer column.

Form B provides a running inventory and check of bars for placing of dispensers. This also is a printed-form provided with headings denoted Brand, Type, Size and Proof which establish the identity of the product. It has a heading entitled Bar to show the location; a heading entitled Par to show the number-of bottles of the particular type and brand kept as inventory on the bar; and headings entitled, respectively, Unit Value and Drink Value for aid in checking the contents and sale of the bottles of liquor.

Form B also is. provided with a number of columns headed, respectively, Meter Serial, Meter Reading, Sales of (seven), Remarks and Invoice. The Sales of columns have subcolumns, respectively, entitled Inventory Reading, Value and Off on Bar. The serial number and meterreading of the liquor register is entered on Form B. In the column Invoice is put the invoice number of the stock from which the bottle was taken. The meter runs from a reading of 00m 99 and begins at 00 again. It has no provision for a set back because it was felt that if each bottle had a different reading it would be harder for the actual dispenser to keep track of the readings. The largest size bottle commonly used on a bar is gallon. Thiscontains 64 ounces. We felt that 100 units would easily register the drinks poured from any one bottle. I

When the management desires to check the quantity of liquor sold against the cash receipts, they enter in the Sale Of column of Form-B the date. The meter readings of all bottles empty or full delivered to that bar are placed in the Inventory Reading column and whether the bottles are removed from or still on the bar is designated in the Off on Bar column by X for ofi and a V for on the bar.

The entry for the Value column is the difference between the Meter Reading column and the Inventory Reading column multiplied by the Drink Value. This value is usually found by using a dial calculator of the concentric disc type, in which three discs are employed and mounted for rotation on a common axis. The discs are progressively smaller in diameter from the bottom disc upward. On the rim of the lower disc there are 100 numbers reading 00' to 99. The middle disc is provided with an arrow which is set at the Meter Reading columnfigure denoted on the dial of the bottom disc. The middle disc also bears a printed scale arranged in radial lines for reading through radially disposed slots in the uppermost disc. The scale of the middle disc gives printed values for individual drinks, and the margins of the slots in the outer disc have indicia denoting drink price. With the arrow of the upper disc positioned at the Inventory Reading figure, the value printed on the middle disc may be instantly read through the appropriate slot for the Drink Value in the upper disc. This calculator provides a means of taking a quick inventory. It is easy to operate and prevents mathematical errors.

By adding the entries in the Value column of a certain date, the value of all liquor sold is obtained and may be compared with the cash receipts of the same period. Any discrepancy is immediately evident and a positive knowledge of operation is obtained. By adding the entries in the Value column of a certain invoice, the actual return is obtained. This is entered under the Analysis section of Form A. In this section the No. of Bottles is the addition of the Issues columns; the Invoice Price is the Unit Price multiplied by the No. of Bottles. The Value is the Unit Value multiplied by the N0. of Bottles. The Est. Spread is the differencebetween the 10- Value and the InvoicePrice and the Actual Spread between the Actual Return and the InvoiceBrice. This will enable the management to formulate a realistic'price policy.

On Form B-a comparison of the Value entries and the Unit Value enables the management to determine. whether the bottles purchased have been properly-filled. A fill of 25 instead of 25.6 ounces in a fifth can be easily detected. After the inventory of the bar has been completed, the steward, by looking at the Off On Bar column and the Par entry will know how many bottles to issue to the bar. Form B precludes any requisition slips and saves time and effort. It gives a quick, easy, complete'running inventory of the bar. During an inventory period, as soon as a bottle has beenemptied and removed from the bar, the steward records the reading of the meter under Inv. Reading, makes an X in the Oif On Bar column, and through the dial gets entry for Value column. He then breaks the seal and removes the liquid register. It is then ready to be placed on another bottle.

Although we have illustrated and described certain details of structure and arrangement of parts which enter into the disclosed embodiment of our invention, it is to be understood that the structure disclosed isfillustrative and not re strictive and that within the scope of the invention as claimed any desired modifications and changes maybe made in the details and arrangement of parts in the construction illustrated.

We claim:

1. A dispensing register for bottled liquids comprising, a bottle attachable casing, a partition dividing the casing interior'in two compartments one of which provides a liquid trap chamber, a dispensing outlet for the trap chamber through a wall of the casing, avalve controlling the outlet and biased to closed position, said partition having an aperture for the delivery of liquid to the trapchamber, a valve controlling said apertur and biased to open position, means operativeby'the aperture valve in closing to open the dispensing outlet valve, a register in the other compartment, means operative by the aperture valve in closing to actuate the register, and operating means for said aperture valve having a portion disposed externally of the casing for manual operation l 2. A dispensing register for bottled liquids comprising, a bottle attachable casing, a partition dividing the casing interior in two compartments one of which provides a liquid trap chamber, a dispensing outlet for said chamber through a wall of the casing, a control valve for the outlet biased to closed position, said partition having an aperture for the delivery of liquid to the trap chamber and having also a passage for the relief of air from the trap chamber, a slide valve controlling both said aperture and the passage and biased .to open position, a lever fulcrumed intermediate its ends on said partition, an operating connection between one end of saidlever and the outlet valve in the trap chamber, means biasing the other end of the lever into camming relation with said slide valve whereby the lever is rocked to open the outlet valve upon closing movement of the slide valve, means for operating said slide valve to open and closed positions, a register in the other compartment, and a register actuator operativefby the slide valve operating m a s v p 3. A dispensing register for bottled liquids comprising, a bottle attachable casing, a partition dividing the casing interiorin two compartments one of which provides a liquid trap chamber, a dispensing outlet for said chamber through a wall of the casing, a control valve for the outlet biased to closed position, said partition having an aperture for the delivery of liquid to the trap chamber and having also a passage for the relief of air from the trap chamber, a slide valve con trolling both said aperture and thepassage and biased to open position, means cooperative with both said valves to open the outletvalveon closing of the slide valve, a register in the other compartment,'joint'operating means for the slide valve and register, ,said slide valve having an air passage'therein open. to said other compartment and registering with the partition air passage when the's'lide valve reaches fully closed position whereby. toadmit'air. to the trap chamber when its outlet valve is open.

4. A dispensingregister for bottledliquids comprising, a bottle attachable closure, a' casing thereon, a mounting member in the casing, a partition on said mounting member extending across the casing to provide a trap chamber in one end thereof, said mounting member having a liquid flow bore open at one end. through the closure and at its other-end through the partition to the trap chamber, a valve on said mounting member and controlling the flow bore, a register on said mounting member, valve carried for the trap chamber, a control valve in the outlet and biased to closed position, means controlled by said first named valve on operation thereof to open the outlet valve, and operating means for said first named valve having a portion disposed through a wall of the casing for manual actuation externally of the casing.

5. In a dispensing register having a bottle attachable casing enclosing a liquid trap chamber, and a dispensing outlet therefor through a wall of the casing; a conduit in the casing for delivering liquid to the trap chamber, a valve controlling said conduit, an operating lever fulcrumed in the casing and having a handle portion passed through a wall of the casing, a link conecting the inner endof the lever and'said valve, a register in the casing, a pawl pivotally connected to said valve for driving engagement with the register ,to actuate the same on operation of the valve, a spring biasing said pawl out of engagement with the register, and liquid level responsive means in the trap chamber and in operative connection with said pawl for moving the pawl into driving engagement with the register against the bias of the spring when the trap chamber is filled to capacity.

6. In a dispensing register having a bottle attachable casing, a partition dividing the casing interior in two compartments one of which provides a liquid trap chamber, a bottle blosure in the casing and providing an end wall of the other compartment, a mounting member extending axially of the casing between said closure and the partition, the mounting member having therethrough a liquid flow bore open at one end through the closure and'at the other end through the partition for delivery of liquid to the trap chamber, a slide valve in the mounting member and reciprocable therein across the liquid flow bore to ,control'the same, an operating lever fulcrum'ed in the casing on one side of the mounting member and having a handle portion passed through the casing wall for exterior manipulation, a stud extending laterally from a side edge of the slide valve, a throw link pivotally connected at its ends to the valve stud and the inner end of the operating lever, a second stud extending laterally from the opposite side edge of the slide valve, a shaft journalled through the mounting member beneath the slide valve, a crank fixed to each end ofthe shaft, a throw link pivotally connected at its ends to the first named stud and the adjacent shaft crank, a throw link pivotally connected at its ends to the second stud and the adjacent shaft crank, a register on the mounting member on the side opposite that of the operating lever fulcrum, and a register actuating pawl pivotally mounted on said second stud for driving engagement with the register.

- '7. In a dispensing register having a bottle attachable casing enclosing a liquid trap chamber, a dispensing outlet for the chamber through a wall of the casing, aconduit in the casing for delivering liquid to the trap chamber, a slide valve controlling said conduit and movable between open and closed limit positions, means for operating the slide valve, a' rocker lever pivoted in the casing, means biasing a portion of said lever into the path of closing movement of the slide valve for displacement thereby to rock the lever, a valve in the trap-chamber controlling the dispensing outlet, and a pivotal connection between said outlet valve and the lever whereby rocking of the lever on displacement by the slide valve moves the outlet valve to open position.

8. In a dispensing register having a bottle attachable casing enclosing a liquid trap chamber, a dispensing tube extending through a wall of the casing with its inner end projecting well into the chamber, a sleeve telescoped over the inner end of said tube and of an internal diameter appreciably larger than the external diameter of the tube, said sleeve having its inner end closed and axially depressed to provide a valve for seating in the inner endof the tube to close the same, means biasing the sleeve to valve closed position, the length'of the sleeve being substan tially the same as the length of the dispensing tube within the trap chamber, means for delivering liquid'to the trap chamber, and means operative to move the sleeve axially of the dispensing tube to valve opened position.

' 9. A dispensing register for bottled liquids comprising, a bottle attachable casing, a partition dividing the casing interior in two compartments one of which provides a liquid trap chamber, a dispensing outlet for said chamber through a wall of the casing, a control valve for the outlet and biased to closed position, said partition having an aperture for the delivery of liquid to the trap chamber and having also a passage for the relief of air from the trap chamber, a slide valve controlling both said aperture and the passage and biased to open position, means operative by the aperture valve in closing to open the dispensing outlet valve, a register in the other compartment, means operative by the aperture valve in closing to actuate the register, and operating means for said aperture valve having a portion disposed externally of the casing for manual operation.

10. A dispensing register for bottled liquids comprising, a bottle attachable casing, a partition dividing the casing interior in two compartments one of which provides a liquid trap chamber, a dispensing outlet for said chamber through let and biased to closed position, said partition having an aperture for the delivery'of liquid to the trap chamber and having also a passage for the relief of air from the trap chamber, a, valve controlling both said aperture and the passage, means for operating the aperture valve to open and closed positions, means movable by said aperture valve during its manipulation to open said dispensing outlet valve, a register in the other compartment, an actuator for the register operative by the aperture valve operating means, and

means in the casing preventing actuation of the register while the casing is in other than dispensing position.

11. A dispensing register for bottled liquids comprising, a bottle attachable casing, a partition dividing the casing interior in two compartments one of which provides a liquid trap chamher, a dispensing outlet for said chamber through a Wall of the casing, said partition having an aperture for the delivery of liquid to the trap chamber, a valve slidable on said partition to a position closing the aperture and biased to a position opening the aperture, means for moving said valve to closed position, a register in the other compartment, an actuator for the register opera- 14 V tive by said valve in moving to closed position, a lever pivoted in the casing to swing towards and away from said partition and normally engaging the partition in non-dispensing position of the casing, a stop on'said lever projecting into the path of closing movement of the valve in nondispensing position of the casing to block closing movement of the valve, and a, float in the trap chamber engaging said lever in the absence of a full measure of liquid in the trap chamber and retaining the lever stop in valve blocking position, said float being responsive to the level of liquid in the trap chamber for movement to release said lever and thereby remove its stop from valve blocking position upon the occurrence of a full measure of liquid in the trap chamber.

EUSTACE S. SCANNELL. LOUIS W. BERNI.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 1,070,917 Ross Aug. 19, 1913 2,473,462 Wortman June 14, 1949

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1070917 *May 14, 1912Aug 19, 1913Charles P RossLiquid-measuring appliance.
US2473462 *Oct 8, 1948Jun 14, 1949J E Berger CorpMetering means for a bottle having a lock to ensure the tipping of the bottle to dispense
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2777614 *Jun 11, 1952Jan 15, 1957Arena Joseph PMeasuring and dispensing device for liquor
US2883086 *Dec 12, 1955Apr 21, 1959American Machine & MetalsLiquid dispensing attachment for bottle, with means for automatically measuring a charge upon inversion of bottle
US3097769 *Mar 13, 1961Jul 16, 1963Harold PayneSiphoning liquid dispenser
US3165235 *Nov 20, 1962Jan 12, 1965Madaffer FrankDispensing device and counter in combination therewith
US5785844 *Apr 25, 1996Jul 28, 1998Recovery Engineering, Inc.End of life mechanism for water treatment cartridge
US5799836 *Sep 10, 1997Sep 1, 1998Lee; Huoo-KeVented pouring spout with filter
Classifications
U.S. Classification222/38, 222/449, 222/416, 222/189.7, 222/442, 222/36, 222/448
International ClassificationG01F11/26, G01F11/10
Cooperative ClassificationG01F11/263, G01F11/267
European ClassificationG01F11/26C, G01F11/26B2