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Publication numberUS2605980 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 5, 1952
Filing dateDec 12, 1947
Priority dateDec 12, 1947
Publication numberUS 2605980 A, US 2605980A, US-A-2605980, US2605980 A, US2605980A
InventorsAllemand Charles C L, Atwood Rawson
Original AssigneeG B Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Spool
US 2605980 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Aug. 5, 1952 R. ATWdoD ETAL SPOOL" 2 SHEETS-Sl-iEET 1 Filed Dec. 12, 1947 FIG.4

FIG!

INVENTOFLS sow ATWOOD 5 c. L'ALLEMAND 'A ORNEYS RA CHAQLE Q4Z /y@1 Aug. 5, 1952 R. ATWOOD ETAL SPOOL 2 --SHEETSSHEET 2 Filed Dec. 12, 1947 FIG. 9

FIGIO FIG.|4

} INVENTORS ATWOO D 0. BY

PAM/SON CHARLES LALLEMANQ,

" ATT YS Patented Aug. 5, 1952 SPOOL. I 4 R'awson Atwood, Garden City, and Charles C.

V LAllema'nd, Kew: Gardens, GLB'. 00.; Brooklyn, N. Y.

N. Y.,. assignors to.

, Application s m s iaiaiajseria No."i91, 22 0' This invention relates to improvements in spools, I

It is an object of theinvention to-provlde a spool construction in which-the parts are positively interlocked together.

The spool of the invention is intended primarily for use as a textile spool. Such spools have heretofore been made of metal such as steel or duraluminum, and other materials such as wood and cardboard. which materials are readily fastenedtogether by welding, riveting, and other processes which involve the permanent deformation of the spool structural member or by means of screws and nails which willhold satisfactorily in such materials.

When it is attempted to construct textile spools from modern plastic materials and to utilize prior methods of construction, difiiculty is encountered since such materials do not lend themselves readily to attachment by riveting or upsetting operations, or by turning over tabs or the formation of welded joints. Similar difficulties are encountered with otherwise desirable materials such as. magnesium alloys.

It is a further object of the invention to provide a spool construction adapted to the joining of plastic components or metallic components of comparable brittleness.

A further object of the invention is to make improved provisions for avoiding: thread trapping.

With these and other objects which will appear in the following full description in mind, the invention consists of the combinations and arrangements of parts and details of construction which will now first be fully described in connection with the accompanying drawing and then be more particularly pointed out in the appended claims.

In the drawing:

Figure 1 is a central longitudinal section through a barrel member constructed according to the invention, and is taken on. the-line l-l of Figure 2;

Figure 2 is an end view'of the barrel oi Figure 1; H

Figure 3' is a plan view of a flange adapted for assembly with, the barrel of' Figure 1;

Figure 4. is a sectionon theline 4-4 of Figure 3;

Figure 5 isa centrallongitudinal sectionshowing the flange of- Figures 3 and 4 in an intermediate assembly position on one end of the barreloi Figures 1 and 2;

Figure 6 is, a view similar to Figure 5 and showing a further step in the assembly;-

. in elevation f and 'partlyin" central longitudinal section;- v

Figure 8' is a plan view of an end plugmember forming part of the spool of Figure 7":

Figure 8-A is a side elevation of this member?" Figure 9 shows a modified member of Figure 8-A;

Figure 10 shows in central longitudinal secform of the plug tion a modified formof'barrel end adapted for Figures-9, and 10;"

Figure 12 is a section on the line -l2'-12 of Figure 11; I

Figure 13 is a view corresponding to Figure 5, showing a modification of the. elements thereof; and

Figure 14 is a view similar to- Figure '13 but illustrating a further modification.

The spool selectedfor illustration in Figures 1 to S-A of the drawing comprises-a barrel I, end flanges 5 and end plug members Ill. The barrel l is preferably formed from a tube of laminated plastic. A' tube formed of a paper winding impregnatedwith a thermosetting plastic'such as phenol-formaldehyde resin and properly cured and set under heat'and pressure in accordance with known and conventional practice is satisfactory. Other laminated or unlaminated' tubular elements may, however, be employed. The end flanges 5' may be formed from any suitable plastic, vulcanized fiber, magnesium alloy and otherdesired-material. The end plugs it] may be made of any of a number of material and in particular; from a wide variety of thermosettingand thermoplasticsynthetic resins, economy and easeof molding or Figure 7 is aview of a completed spool,. partly casting being primary considerations. The following description will make clear: the manner in which the spool-structureis: adapted, to the use of the .materials described. as: well as other materials which: donot lend themselves readily to conventional methods of manufacture.

The spool chosen. for: illustration is: a double flanged spooLand both ends; of the; barrel l are shaped for attaching an end flange 5. The shapingof the barrel end includes the cutting or otherwise forming. of a peripheral groove. 2 and slots 3. Where the formingv is done-by machining operations, itwill be apparent that the groove Zymay be cut on a lathe and the slots 3 formed by two cuts across the. end of the spool in a milling machine. The cutting, of the slots 3 produces four circumferentially spaced projections 4 separated by the slots 3 and undercut by the peripheral groove 2. The numberof projectionsg l may be; varied, wheredesired: For

drical bore 6 with a diameter equal to the outside diameter of the barrel I. The inner part of the aperture wall (lower part of Figure 4) comprises projections or lugs 1, extending inwardly and separated by gaps 8 in which the bore wall 6 is continued. The lugs I occupy arcs vcorresponding to the slots 3 of the barrel end,:so that the flange may be slipped axially onto an end of the barrel I, with the lugs I fitting within the slots 3 and the gaps 8 being in registry with the projections 4. When the flange 5 has been thus seated on an end of the barrel l, as indicated in Figure 5, the lugs I will, be circumferentially aligned with the grooves 2.of the projections 4 and the flange may now .be turned one-eighth turn so as to bringthe projections I into the grooves 2. The projections I preferably flt closely within the groove 2, only the minimumnecessary clearancebeing provided axially of the spool. The turning of the flange puts the parts in the position of Figure 6, clearing the slots 3. End plug I0 may now be inserted. This plug comprises a generally cylindrical central projection H which is of a diameter equal to the inside diameter of thebarrel I and around which are formed four projections or lugs I2, shaped to flt the slots 3. The member ID extends radially outward beyond the projections I2, forming a flange I 3 which seats against the outer surface of the spool flange 5, as indicated in Figure 7. The end plug I 0, illustrated in Figures '7, 8 and 8-A, is formed with a keyhole shaped opening I4 to accommodate a spindle and driving lugs of a whorl or'other spool driving bearing. Where the end of the spool inquestion is not to be driven, a round opening may be substituted for the keyhole shaped opening I4, as indicated in dotted linesat the lower end of the spool of Figure 7.

It will be noted that plug portion I I which extends into the barrel end behind the projections 4, backs up the latter and prevents them from bending inwardly when a separating force is applied between the flange and spool barrel. This action is important. It has been found that where the projections 4 are not thus backed up and the flange is loaded until failure of the joint occurs, the projections 4 will break in shear. Where the plug I0 has a driving fit, however, and backs up the .projections 4 effectively, failure 4 dicated by the letter A in Figure 1, and making the angle less than 90 materially strengthens the construction. As will be apparent, if there is no bevel, which is a condition corresponding to a. value of 90: for the angle A, a force tending to separate-the flange and barrel will be exerted as a direct pull against the projection 4 overhanging the groove, tending to shear off this projection. Where the groove wall is beveled, a con- The outer part of this aperture (upoccurs later and tends to occur in tension, the

dition corresponding to a value of less than 1 for angle A, a force tending to separate the flange and barrel and exerted in the axial direction may be resolved into two components, at

. right angles to each other, one of which is normal to'the beveled surface and tends to compress the projection 4 against the plug member II, which backs it up, and both of which are smaller than the axial pull exerted on the flange. The best value for the angle A in any given construction is theoretically a compromise of opposing factors. As a practical matter, if the bevel angle A is made small enough so thatfailure does not occur by shearing off the projection 4 but by breaking the reduced section of the barrel under the groove 2 in tension, the bevel angle is satisfactory, and an angle of about 45 is generally satisfactory. Where the material used is such that this action is obtainablewith a 90 angle, the groove 2 may be square and the groovemay also be formed square wherever this is" simpler from a manufacturing standpoint and suflicient strength is provided for the class of service in which the spool is tobe used;

The end plug I0 locks the lugs I within the grooves 2 and by proper design of the relative dimensions of the lugs I of the slots 3 and projections 4, a positive interlock between flange and barrel for. torque transmission may be obtained. The maximum locking effect will be obtained when the lugs 1 aremade to fit the grooves 2 in the projections '4 exactly, and the lugs I2 are similarly made to fit the slots'3 exactly. Under these conditions, if itis attempted to turn the flange with relation to the barrel, lugs I will oe forced against lu'gs I2 which, in turn, will be forced against the walls of slots 3, thus preventing any turning of the flange with relation to the barrel. Where relative turning through small angles of the flange is not objectionable, the spool may be manufactured more cheaply by providing circumferential clearance between the parts. Where such clearance is provided, the frictional holdingagainst twisting of the flange on the barrel-may be sufficient, and, where not suflicient, adhesives may-be applied to the engaging surfaces of the parts before assembly so as to supplement the mechanical interlock with the holding power of the adhesive. Lugs I2 while preferablycast on the end plugs I 0 may also be formed as separate pieces and inserted in the slots 3 before driving the plugs I0.

It will be observed that when the spool is completely assembled the end structure may be substantially solid, the slots and grooves in the barrel ends being filled by the lugs I and lugs I2.

In the construction just described, thread trapping may be minimized by providing a close flt of the parts so as to prevent thread from entering between projections 1 and the inner walls of grooves 2 or between the inner walls of slots 3 and the ends of lugs I2. Further prevention may be obtained by filling the cracks where trapping may occur with rubber cement or other seam filling material. In cases where such provision against thread trapping is not adequate or economical, further provision may be made as illustrated in the modification of Figures 9 to 12. The spool there disclosed is identical with that previously described except that lugs 22 having convex inner ends ZZ-A are substituted for lugs l2, and slots 23 having correspondingly concave lower ends 23-A are substituted for the slots 3. The lugs 22 when seated in the slots 23 form nibs 26 extending inwardly from the inner face of the flange 5. Since a fiber wrapped circumferentially of the barrel will be disposed as a chord of the are 21 of the joint between the lug 22 and slot 23, tendency of the thread to trap therein is minimized.

Th flange may also be formed with an annular groove 30 on its inner face so as to overlap the barrel, as indicated in Figure 13, which figure corresponds otherwise to Figure 6. The lug construction of Figures 9 to 12 inclusive may also be utilized with the flange structure of Figure 13.

Figure 14 illustrates a further modification of the invention in which the plug may be flush with the outer surface of the flange 45. In this case, the end of the barrel 4|, which is otherwise similar to the barrel I just described, is cut down slightly and the plug 49, otherwise similar to the plug I0, is formed with a flange or lip 42 to fit into the extra space thus created. The axial dimensions of the parts of Figure 14 may be varied as desired for obtaining the greatest mechanical strength.

What is claimed is:

1. In a spool and in combination, a tubular barrel having peripherally grooved and circumferentially spaced end projections extending axially therefrom with spaces separating the said projections, a flange member having an aperture adapted to accommodate the said projections and lugs extending inwardly and proportioned for axial insertion in the spaces between the said projections and fitting in the peripheral grooves of the said projections upon turning of the flange relative to said barrel, and a member inserted in the end of the barrel, preventing radially inward movement of the said projections and comprising lugs for filling the said spaces and thus, locking the flange lugs; within the said groove.

2. In a spool and in combination, a tubular barrel having peripherally grooved and circumferentially spaced end projections, a flange member having an aperture adapted to accommodate the said projections and lugs extending inwardly and proportioned for axial insertion in the spaces between the said projections and fitting in the peripheral grooves of the said projections upon turning of the flange relative to the barrel, and a member inserted in the end of the barrel for preventing radially inward movement of the said projections and having lugs filling the said spaces between the projections, and. in which the flange lugs fit the grooves circumferentially without substantial clearance whereby the said flange lugs and lugs filling the barrel end spaces cooperate to provide a positive torque transmitting interlock between barrel and flange.

3. In a spool and in combination, a tubular barrel having peripherally grooved and circumferentially spaced end projections extending axially therefrom, a flange member having a central bore adapted to fit over an end of the barrel and lugs extending inwardly therefrom and proportioned for axial insertion in the spaces between the said projections. and fitting in the peripheral grooves of the said projections upon turning of the flange relative to said barrel, and means for filling the said spaces between the barrel projections for locking the flange lug in the peripheral grooves.

4. A spool according to claim 3 in which the flange lugs fit the grooves circumferentially without substantial clearance whereby the lugs and means filling the spaces between projections provide a positive torque transmitting interlock between flange and barrel.

5. In a spool and in combination, a tubular barrel having peripherally grooved and circumferentially spaced end projections, a flange member having a central bore adapted to fit over an end of the barrel and lugs thereon proportioned for axial insertion in the spaces between the said projections and for fitting in the peripheral grooves thereof upon turning of said flange relative to said barrel, the said spaces between projections having concave bottom walls extending axially of the barrel beyond the flange, and means filling the said spaces to lock the lugs in the grooves and forming joints with the said concave bottom walls.

6. In a spool and in combination, a tubular barrel having peripherally grooved and circumferentially spaced end projections, a flange member having a central bore adapted to fit over an end of the barrel and lugs extending inwardly from the middle part of the bore wall and proportioned for axial insertion in the spaces between the said projections and fitting in the peripheral grooves of the said projections upon turning of the flange relative to said barrel, the

flange bore inward of the lugs overlapping the barrel axially inwardly of the said spaces and the flange bore outwardly of the lugs surrounding the projections axially beyond the said peripheral grooves.

7. In a spool and in combination, a tubular barrel having peripherally grooved and circumferentially spaced end projections, a flange member having projections fitting in the grooves of the barrel projections and a member inserted in the end of the barrel and preventing radially inward movement of the said barrel projections, the outer walls of the grooves being beveled.

8. A spool according to claim 7, in which the angle of bevel of the groove walls is such that failure of the spool under excess pull on a flange occurs by breaking in tension of, the barrel projections under the grooves rather than by shearing beyond the grooves.

9. A spool according to claim 7, in which the bevel angle is substantially forty-five degrees.

RAWSON ATWOOD. CHARLES C. LALLEMAND.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent: V

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 200,706 Fay Feb. 26, 1878 775,994 Smith Nov. 29, 1904 1,003,791 Prickett Sept. 19, 1911 1,919,270 Bird July 25, 1933 2,047,434 Schurmann July 14, 1936 FOREIGN PATENTS Number Country Date 107,325 Great Britain June 28, 1917 379,747 Germany Aug. 27, 1923 578,556 France July 5, 1924

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US200706 *Dec 7, 1877Feb 26, 1878 Improvement in bobbins and spools
US775994 *Jan 18, 1904Nov 29, 1904Morley Button Mfg CompanySpool or the like.
US1003791 *Jan 26, 1911Sep 19, 1911Zae E PrickettType-writer ribbon-spool.
US1919270 *Dec 2, 1931Jul 25, 1933George H BirdSpool
US2047434 *Jun 12, 1935Jul 14, 1936Ind A G AllegroKnock-down spool or bobbin
DE379747C *Jun 1, 1921Aug 27, 1923Johannes SchmidtScheibenspule, bei welcher die Scheiben mit dem Spulenrohr durch Verzapfung verbunden und in das Spulenrohr Stoepsel zum Festhalten der Klammern eingesetzt sind
FR578556A * Title not available
GB107325A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2793821 *Oct 16, 1956May 28, 1957Abraham MadowWire reel dispensers
US3113743 *Mar 10, 1959Dec 10, 1963Macmillan Bloedel And Powell RRemovable core tip
US3329371 *Mar 5, 1964Jul 4, 1967Shakespeare CoRemovable line shield for spinning reel spools
US3552677 *Dec 16, 1968Jan 5, 1971Plastics IncKnockdown spool
US4976475 *May 18, 1989Dec 11, 1990Ab Varnamo GummifabrikKnock down spool
US5354012 *Feb 25, 1993Oct 11, 1994Vincent James DBobbin for rotatable, releasable attachment to identical bobbins
US6073868 *Feb 24, 1998Jun 13, 2000Sonoco Development, Inc.Re-usable yarn winding tube having removable end caps
US6234421Oct 4, 1999May 22, 2001Vandor CorporationReel having secured flanges
US7677823 *Jun 13, 2005Mar 16, 2010Brother Kogyo Kabushiki KaishaRolled-print-medium holder device
US20060051152 *Jun 13, 2005Mar 9, 2006Brother Kogyo Kabushiki KaishaRolled-print-medium holder device
Classifications
U.S. Classification242/118.7, 242/118.61
International ClassificationB65H75/14
Cooperative ClassificationB65H75/14, B65H2701/5136, B65H2701/31
European ClassificationB65H75/14