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Publication numberUS2607133 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 19, 1952
Filing dateFeb 11, 1950
Priority dateFeb 11, 1950
Publication numberUS 2607133 A, US 2607133A, US-A-2607133, US2607133 A, US2607133A
InventorsHarold J Marlowe
Original AssigneeWinona Hughes, Leon N Weiss
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Shoe with detachable upper
US 2607133 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Aug. 19, 1952 H. J. MARLOWE 5 SHOE WITH DETACHABLE UPPER Filed Feb. 11, 1950 2 SHEETS-SHEET 1 'lzmrmlrawawl "w"! 0 50 54 48 4b 8% 58 g 114:1;e1nu5: 4

i 5 INVENTOR.

I- meow MAELOWE MM awe/14ers Aug. 19, 1952 H. J. MARLOWE SHOE WITH DETACHABLE UPPER 2 SHEETSVSHEET 2 Filed Feb. 11, 1950 INVENTOR M2040 .1 4442mm:-

Patented Aug. 19, 1952 Harold J.- Marlowe, New York, N. Y., assignor to Winona Hughes, New York, and Leon N. Weiss,

New Rochelle, N. Y.

Application February 11, 1950, serial No.'143,77'0

2 Claims.

The present invention relates to a noveltype of shoe construction which permits shoes of difierent sizes to be made from standardized parts of -fixed size and which permits an upper tobe detach'ably secured thereto.

- It has in the past been necessary, in making shoes of different sizes-to manufacture shoes of one size independently of shoes of different sizes. This makes for waste in manufacture andconsequently' gives rise'to'expensiv'eness in the shoe structure" itself. 1

It has been proposed to reduce the expensiveness of shoes, and at the same timeincrease their efiective life, by making the body portion of the shoes of soinerigid material'su'ch as metal 'or plastic which may be molded or die-"cast in inexpensivequantityproduction, the rigid portions being interconnectedbya resilient insert so that the shoe can conform'to the change in shape of the foot in walking. I+Iowever, even with this construction, different rigid body" portions must be made for each shoesize; thus g ving riseto considerable additional expense in manufacture, since for each size-individual expensive dies or moldsmust be employed.

-It is a prime-object of the present invention to avoid the above disadvantages by providing for a shoe construction in which the preferably rigid and metallic body portions are identical for shoes of different sizes, the size of the shoebeing determinedfby the dimensions of'tne resilient memberwhichinterconnects the two rigid body portions." In thiswa-ythe expensive'comp'onents of theshoe, the rigid body portions, are the same for; different shoe; sizes and consequently one set of 'dies or molds will suftlce for the production of-- 'af-- complete line; of shoes. Only the relatively inexpensive resilient insert will differ from size to size It has also been proposed the past to provide shoes with uppers which are detachable from the body portion so that uppers may be removed 'for cleaning or replaced-with uppers of; a different style or color to varythe eifect produced by the shoe andjthus harmonize with different types or has been providedthesecuring means suggested 1 2 heretofore being non-positive in operation, imparting to the shoea non-decorative or functional appearance,- and -being diiiicult to manipulate. 7

It is another object'of' the present invention to devise a novel securing means for cletachably fastening an upper to a shoe body portion, such securing means being particularly adapted ror use with shoe body port-ions formed of metal or similar rigid material but not necessarily limited thereto. A subsidiary object is to provide such a securing means which protects the side surfaces of the upper against abrasion where those sur faces overlie the side surfaces oi the body portion. 'A further subsidiary object'is to provide a securing means which can enhance the decorative appearance of the shoe, as by providing for a color contrast or color mat-ching effect as desired. I I 7 Another object or the present'invention is to devise a shoe construction'which is sturdy, adaptable and inexpensive and Which may be made from a'plurality of more or less standardized parts. i r v The present invention is here" specifically dis closed as applied to a play shoe ofthe sandal type, but it obviously has aspects and implications considerably broader thanthe specific disclosure.

To the accomplishment of theioregoing objects and such other objectsasmay hereinafter appear, the present invention relates to a noe construction as definedin the. appended claims and, as described in this, specification taken together with the accompanying drawings in whichi Y V V 1 is a side elevational View or a shoe embodying the present invention;

Fig. 2 is a top plan view thereof; A w Fig. '3 "is an: end cross-sectional View taken along the line 3+3 of Fig; 1; i a

'Fign l is an end cross sectional view taken alongtheline4-=d oi'Fig. '1';

Fig; 5 is a crossesectiona-l viewtaken along the'line 5+5 of Fig; '1; and i 1 Figs. 6 and? are} sideielevational and top plan views -respectively1o i a shoe similar "to that of Figsl and. 2 but of a largersize; and-with the uppers andinner soleremoved. I i Y Broadly considered theshoe comprises body portion generally designated A to-whi-ehan upper generally designated B is detachablysecured. The body portionincludes a toe portionC', a heel portion D and a' resilient member Esecur'ed between the toeportion- C and heel portion Dso that the shoe may articulate. The toe and heel portions C and D are identical for shoes of different lengths and are preferably made of some rigid material such as aluminum or the like conveniently die-cast into shape, or of a plastic material which has been molded into shape, although wood or any other rigid or semi-rigid material may be used. The resilient member E varies in length and shape according to the size of shoes desired and consequently shoe body portions A of different sizes (compare the shoe of Fig. 1 with that of Fig. 6) will diifer only in the size and shape of the resilient member E. since the major item of expense in the manufacture of a shoe of this type resides in the cost of the dies or molds required to form the toe and heel portions C and D, it will be appreciated that this results in a very significant saving, since the same pair of molds or dies may be employed for shoes of varying lengths.

The upper B is detachably secured to the body portion A by means of brackets F which fit over the lower surfaces of the uppers B and clamp the uppers B to the body portion A, a securing device G passing through the body portion A and securely and positively clamping brackets F to the body portion A from the interior thereof. The brackets F are preferably made in identical and interchangeable pairs, thus further reducing the cost of manufacture of the shoe.

The toe portion C is cast, molded or otherwise formed into appropriate shape so as to have a top surface 2, a bottom surface 4 and a side surface 6. A transverse aperture 8 is formed therethrough at any appropriate point along its length and preferably additional opposed pairs of apertures IB and i2, similarly oriented, are provided adjacent to the through aperture 8. The outer ends of the through aperture 8 are countersunk at H! and recesses l6 are formed in the side surfaces 6 of the toe portion C surrounding the open ends of the apertures 8, l and [2, the recesses l6 extending completely to the top. surface 2 of the toe portion C. The inner end edge It of the toe portion C is provided with a slot extending completely from one side surface 6 to the other, that slot having an enlarged inner portion 22.

The heel portion D is constructed similarly to the toe portion C except for the necessary changes in shape, the same. reference numerals being applied to the heel portion D as to the toe portion C for similar constructional elements. The recesses in the side surfaces 6 of the heel portion D are designated by the numeral It to indicate that those recesses do not extend all the way to the top surface 2 thereof and the additional apertures in the heel portion D are designated by the numerals l0 and I2 to indicate that they pass completely through the heel'portion D, whereas the apertures I0 and 12 in the toe portion C do not pass completely therethrough. These difierentiations are merely optional modifications which might be employed in the toe portion C alone, in both the toe and heel portions 0 and D, or in neither of those portions. l

The rigid toe and heel portions C and D are connected by means of a resilient member E in the form of a rubber insert 24 having end projections 26 shaped to fit within the slots 28 and the enlarged portions 22 thereof in each of the toe and heel portions 0 and D. The top and bottom surfaces of the rubber insert 24 merge smoothly with the top and bottom surfaces 2 and 4 of the toe and heel portions C and D so that the insert E forms a support for the portion of the foot directly thereover. The insert 24 preferably extends completely from side to side of the shoe so that its side surfaces merge smoothly with the side surfaces 6 of the toe and heel portions C and D. Thu the composite shoe defined by the toe and heel portions C and D and the resilient member E has a peripheral shape at its top, bottom and sides with no irregularities therein and comparable to a normal shoe. In Figs. 1-5 a rubber insert 24 having a relatively short length is employed, the shoe formed by its use being of a relatively small size. By way of comparison, in Figs. 6 and 7 a rubber insert 24' of somewhat greater length is employed with toe and heel portions C and D identical with those in the embodiment of Figs. l-5. A a result, a shoe of considerably greater length is produced. It will be noted that the curvature of the side surfaces of the insert 24' is different from the curvature of the side surfaces of the insert 24, this being necessary in order to compensate for the different spacing between the toe and heel portions D produced by the greater length of the insert 24' when compared with that of the insert 24. It therefore will be realized that by this means shoes of different sizes can be efliciently and effectively produced merely by varying the length and shape of the resilient member E, that member also serving the function of permitting the shoe structure to articulate to conform to the change of shape of the foot during walking and at the same time aiding in the support of the foot.

The resilient member E maybe retained between the toe and heel portions C and D by means of a, suitable adhesive effective between its projecting portions 26 and the interior of the slots 20 and the enlarged portions 22 thereof or in any other convenient manner. It will be appreciated that in some applications it might be desirable to have the resilient member E more or less readily removable'so that the size of the shoe can be varied at will.

Once the shoe has been constructed it is desirable to secure an inner sole 28 to the top of the body portion A and an outer sole 30 to the bottom thereof, this being accomplished through the use of adhesive.

If the toe and heel portions C and D be made of aluminum or other similar light metal it will be apparent that a light and comfortable shoe will be produced thereby.' If desired, the body portion A may b'e further lightened through the employment of vertical apertures 32 which are shown in the heel portion Din Figs. 6 and butwhich could also be employed in the toe portion. C if desired." Because of the greater thickness of the heel'porti'onD as compared to the toe portion C it is generally preferred that these vertical apertures 32 be provided in the fgrmer'in order to balance'th'e weight of the s cc. r 1

The upper B is here disclosed as oflthe sandal typedefined by .a front strap 34 passable over the forwardpart of the foot and by a rear strap 36 including a heel strap 38 and an ankle strap 40. The straps 34 and 36 are comparativelywide at the points where they are adapted to lie ad jacent the toe and heel'portions C and D, and consequently the lower edges of the straps 34 and 36 are of appreciable length compared to the length of thetoe and. heel portions C and D respectively 'fIhey thus differentiate over thongs or comparatively narrow" straps suchias have been employed in the past in certain types of sandalconstruction. Because of the substantial width ofthe; straps 3'4 and 36, it is imperative thatthey.

not; only be :securedtothe, toe and'heel portions orientationx withrespect thereto, that; isto say,

so that they Will-.nottndto cantor twist about anaxis transverse ofithejtoe and heel portionsv Cand D. "The .lower edges, of the straps 3.4 and 36 are adapted tobe received within the recesses, l6 and H5 in the 'sidesurfacesifi ofthe toeand heel portionscand D respectively and are preferably shaped to snugly fit therein. They are provided with apertures 42- registering with the apertures l and I2 and the countersunk portions 14 of the apertures 8 inthetoe portion C and the apertures l6 and I2 and the countersunk portions l4 of the apertures 8 in the heelportionD respectively.

For each of the toe and heel portions C and D a pair of brackets F are provided, the brackets of each pair preferably being identical in shape and capable. of being matingly received in. the: recesse's l6 and it over the lower surfaces ofthe straps 34- and 36 respectively. Each bracket comprises a body portion 44 having projections 46 passable through the appropriate apertures 42 in the lower ends of the straps 34 and 36' and into the apertures l6 and I2 or H) and IZintthe toe or heel portions C or D respectively; It also carries another and preferably approximately centrally located projection 48 which is countersunk at 56 and provided with a bore 52 therethrough which is internally threaded. This proje'cti'on' 48'is reeeivedwithinthecountersunk portion l4 of the transverse aperturet; A securing device G in the form of a headed bolt 54 passes through the projections 48 and the transverse aperture 8, the head 56 of the bolt being received within the countersunk portion 50 of one projection 48 and the externally threaded tip 58 of the bolt 54 threadedly engaging the internally threaded bore 52 of the opposite projection 48. When the bolt 54 is tightened it will positively and effectively draw the two opposite brackets F together and thus clamp the lower edges of the straps 34 and 36 to the toe and heel portions C and D respectively, the passage of the projections 46 and 46 through the apertures 42 in the straps 34 and 36 ensuring that the uppers, usually made of some tough material such as canvas or duck, cannot become detached from the shoe body portion A. The brackets F are shaped to conform to the side edges of the toe and heel portions C and D respectively and are of a length such as to extend over all or a major portion of the length of the bottom edges of the uppers B. As a result, when the brackets F are clamped in position by the securing device G they will clamp the lower edges of the straps 34 and 36 between themselves and the sides 6 of the toe and heel portions 0 and D, thus retaining the uppers B in proper orientation with respect to the toe and heel portions C and D respectively. The projections 46 laterally spaced from the central projection 48 and passing through appropriately positioned apertures 42 in the straps 34 and 36 provide a positive means for securing the straps 34 and 36 in proper orientation. The depth of the recesses l6 and I6 is such that the lower surfaces of the straps 34 and 36 and the brackets F are completely received therewithin, the outer surfaces of the brackets F preferably forming smooth continuations of the outer'surfaces 16 :of the body por tionA see particularly Figs. 2 andfi) hus avoiding protruding edges which might catchforsnag and enhancing the appearance of the shoe, while at thesame time the brackets protect the clamped portions of thestraps; 34 and 36 against abrasion orcth dama e orde to f rt r ensure-a positiveness of the clampingeffect of the brackets I? the apertures '42 in; the straps 34 and- 36 may be provided witheremmets for re-' enforcementpurposes, 1 ,7

. The shoe of the presentinvention may be m adeup into a very attractive ensemble by using resilient membersEof colored rubber and by appropriately coloring thetoeand heelgportions C and D,- This may ;be done either by paint-- ing the side surtaces 6 thereof orby'forming the portions C andD of colored metal, as is presently available onthe market, *The upper 13 may also be formed of any appropriately colored material, preferably either aiabric or a, plastic, and contrasting. or matching-color effects as desiredcan beta h e ore-pa i s t oi n e s ctxiifier t lo s ay be furnished w t shoesi the; appropriate set being .securable to the body portion A at will in order toprovide any desired decorative efiectsorjto blend with the color scheme of the particular outfit being worn. The upper B maybejremovedfromor secured to the body portion A in a simple manner and by capital investment necessary inproducingnumer-;

Indeed, shoes of the present ous dies or molds. invention might be more or less tailor-made to the foot of the wearer through the use of s a resilient member E of appropriate size, the length of the member E being determined in a fitting operation and the shoe then being assembled by the seller thereof. Moreover, different resilient members E of the same size but of different colors could be purchased by the user of the shoe, these members being frictionally retained between the toe and heel portions C and D but being slidable out therefrom upon the application of lateral pressure in order to permit replacement of a given member E with another or a different color, thus rendering the shoe further capable of exhibiting varied color effect.

It will be apparent that many variations may be made in the shoe construction as here specifically disclosed without departing from the spiritof the invention as defined in the following claims.

I claim:

1. A shoe comprising a body portion and a detachable upper having bottom edges of appreciable length compared to the length of said body portion, said body portion having a transverse aperturetherethrough and a pair of additional transverse apertures parallel therewith adjacent thereto on each opposite side of said body portion, said upper having registering pairs of spaced apertures near opposite bottom edges thereof, a pair of independent brackets separate and detachable from said upper and fittable over the outside of the bottom edges of said upper adjacent the apertures therein, said brackets extending over a major portion of the length of the bottom. edges of said upper, said brackets having projections passable through the apertures in said upperand into the apertures in said body portion, and a separate and detachable securing device passable throughsaidtransverse aperture and engaging both saidbracketsso as to secure them and the' upper to the shoe, said brackets protecting the outer -surface di a-portion of said upper along aside of said --=body portion and, through its projections, retaining the upper in proper orientation on said body portion, said securing device constituting the sole means holding said brackets to said body portion, and said securing device, said brackets and said projections constituting the sole means holding said upper to said body portion, and said body portion, upper and brackets being readily detachable one from the other so that said brackets and said body portionmay be-used with different uppers.

2, A shoe comprising a body portion and a detachable upper having'bottom edges of appreciable length compared'to the length of said body portion, said body portion having a transverse aperture therethrough and a pair of additional transverse apertures parallel therewith adjacent thereto'on each opposite side of said body portion, said upper having registering pairs of spaced apertures near opposite bottom edges thereof, a pair of independent brackets separate and detachable from said upper and fittable overthe outside of the bottom edges of said upper adjacent the apertures therein, said brackets extending over a major portion of the length of the bottom edges of said upper, said brackets having projections passable through'the apertures in said upper and into the apertures in said body portion, and a separate and-detachable securing device passable through said transverse aperture and engaging said brackets and any projections on saidbrackets which are in the transverse aperture through said body portion so as to secure said brackets and the upper to the shoe, said brackets protecting the outer surface of a portion ofsaidupper' along a side of said body portion and, through its" projections, retaining the upper in proper orientation on said body portion, said securing device constituting the sole means holding said brackets to said body portion, and said securing device, saidbrackets and said projections constituting the sole means holding said upper to said body portion, and said body portion, upper and brackets being readily detachable one from the other so that-said brackets and said body portion may be used with difierent uppers.

HAROLD J. MARLOWE.

REFERENCES CITED UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 268,864 1 Cancio Dec. 12, 1882 1,132,096 Jaedike Mar. 16,1915 1,184,702 Staubach May 23, 1916. 1,341,498 Demarmels May 25, 1920 1,463,514 Lilienfeldt July 31, 1923 1,964,364 Pellkofer June 26, 1934 2,112,052 Smith Mar. 22, 1938 2,227,352 Krasnosky Dec. 31, 1940 2,362,010 Hufi Nov. 7, 1944 2,510,236 'Kutcher June 6, 1950 FOREIGN PATENTS I Number V Country Date 371,847 Germany Mar. 19, 1923 455,889 France June 4, ;1913 674,123

Germany Apr. 5, 19 39

Patent Citations
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US268864 *Mar 22, 1882Dec 12, 1882 Jose e
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US1341498 *Apr 8, 1919May 25, 1920Albert WinklerWooden shoe or sandal
US1463514 *Feb 3, 1921Jul 31, 1923Gustav LilienfeldtDetachable shoe sole and heel
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3000116 *Jul 31, 1959Sep 19, 1961Ally Joseph H RSandal
US3099884 *Nov 16, 1961Aug 6, 1963Frank C KixmillerShoes or sandals
US3925915 *Feb 19, 1975Dec 16, 1975Lawrence Peska Ass IncSandal shoe
US3983642 *Dec 4, 1974Oct 5, 1976Liao Wei ChiShoe having interchangeable uppers
US4114296 *Jun 6, 1977Sep 19, 1978Smith Gardner MInterchangeable sandal
US4348820 *Feb 2, 1981Sep 14, 1982Alessio Antonio DShoe structure
US4461102 *Jun 16, 1982Jul 24, 1984Devincentis Cheryl AShoe with interchangeable shoe straps having spring connectors
US4497123 *Mar 4, 1982Feb 5, 1985Patoflex CorporationShoe-sole and method for making the same
US4510702 *Jul 1, 1981Apr 16, 1985Patoflex CorporationSole for shoes and process for producing said sole
US4523396 *Aug 16, 1983Jun 18, 1985Puma-Sportschuhfabriken Rudolf Dassler KgAthletic shoe having spike or stud-shaped cleats exchangeably arranged at the running sole
US5729912 *Jun 7, 1995Mar 24, 1998Nike, Inc.Article of footwear having adjustable width, footform and cushioning
US5813146 *Oct 9, 1997Sep 29, 1998Nike, Inc.Article of footwear having adjustable width, footform and cushioning
US6640464 *Jul 10, 2001Nov 4, 2003Harry HsinSandal with interchangeable upper and sole
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US7540098Jan 6, 2006Jun 2, 2009Linda BastSandal with removable upper
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US8938891 *Apr 3, 2012Jan 27, 2015Clic Lifestyle LtdCollapsible shoe and replaceable straps and methods for making and using same
US9044060 *Aug 23, 2012Jun 2, 2015Sean E. F. DelaneyConvertible shoe
US9044062 *Nov 4, 2013Jun 2, 2015Sean E. F. DelaneyConvertible shoe
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US20120186105 *Apr 3, 2012Jul 26, 2012Quintana KempCollapsible shoe and replaceable straps and methods for making and using same
US20140053432 *Aug 23, 2012Feb 27, 2014Sean E. F. DelaneyConvertible shoe
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Classifications
U.S. Classification36/11.5, 36/33, 36/101, 36/15, 36/DIG.200
International ClassificationA43B3/24
Cooperative ClassificationA43B3/24, Y10S36/02
European ClassificationA43B3/24