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Publication numberUS2607332 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 19, 1952
Filing dateNov 13, 1948
Priority dateNov 13, 1948
Publication numberUS 2607332 A, US 2607332A, US-A-2607332, US2607332 A, US2607332A
InventorsAlfred S Bosma
Original AssigneeHart Carter Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Outboard motor crankcase and oil reservoir construction
US 2607332 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Aug. 19, 1952 ,BOSMA ,6 3

OUTBOARD MOTOR cRANxcAsE AND OILBESERVOIR CONSTRUCTION Filed Nov. 15, 1948 2 SHEETS-SHEET 1 IN VEN TOR.

A. S. BOSMA Aug. 19, 1952 OUTBOARD MOTOR CRANKCASE AND OIL RESERVOIR CONSTRUCTION 2 SI-lEETS-SHEET 2 Filed Nov. 13, 1848 IIIIII l INV T0 BY n ATTORNEY/5'.

Patented Au g. 19, 1 952 ,7 3 41 OUTBOARD MOTOR CRANKCASE AND on.

- 1 V assrmvom CONSTRUCTION Alfr'edfS. Bosma'lNew Holstein, Wis., assignor to g Hart-Carter Company, Peoria, 111., a corporation of Delaware Application November 13, 1948, Serial No; 59,850

, 18 Claims. 1

This invention relates to improvements in outboard motors. r

In my prior Patent No. 2,346,148, a four cycle outboard motor is disclosed having an on sump positioned below the crankcase thereof to provide a reservoir into which oil can drain from the crank case and from which oilcan be pumped to lubricate thevarious parts of the motor.

This patent was .designed forthe purpose of solving the problems which arise where this type of construction is employed and which are caused bythe fact that an outboard motor is frequently tilted to a horizontal position, such as when it is being manuallycarried or while it is being transported in a vehicle. 'Tilting of motors of the above mentioned type, unless specially constructed asin the above mentionedpatent, will cause the oil from the reservoir to flow'back into the crankcase and into the cylinders and pistons. If excessive quantities of such. oil are permitted tocollect in and around the cylinders and pistons it will foul the latterv and prevent proper motor operation. In addition, where a 'conventional breather is. used tovent-the crankcase to the atmosphere excessive oil from the crankcase is likely tqdrain out through said breather when the motor is tilted or placed in a horizontal position. a

It is one of the objects of the present invention to provide an improved four cycle outboard motor of the type havinga separate oil reservoir, wherein positive means is provided'to sealofi the reservoir from thecrankcase tothereby permit the motor to be tilted to any position without lettin oil flow from the reservoir back into the crankcase.

A further object of -theinvention is to provide an outboard motor of the class described havin means-to prevent leakage ofoil from the crankcase .out through the crankcasebreather when said motor is tilted or placed on its side;

, A further object 'of the invention-isv to provide an outboard motor of' the class described wherein a passage is providedbetween the crankcase and the oil reservoir which passage serves as a breather passage as well as anoil drain passage, and wherein a breather passage leads from said reservoir to the atmosphere, there being a single valve for simultaneously"opening or closing both passages whereby the flow of oil either into the crankcase or out through the breather as a result of tiltin'gthe motor canbe-prevented.

' A further objectof the invention is to. provide a motor of the class described havingmanually operated means for actuating the breather valve,

A more specific object of the invention is to provide in a motor of the class described a bellows unit having one end in communication with the discharge side of the oil pump and having a plunger movable by said bellows in response to oil pressure acting thereagainst for actuating the breather valve.

With the above and other objects in view, the invention consists of the improved outboard motor and all of its partsand combinations as set forth in the claims, and all equivalents thereof. In the drawings accompanying and forming a part of this 'specification wherein are shown two embodiments of the invention and wherein the same reference numerals indicate the same parts inalloftheviews:

Fig; l is-a fragmentary vertical sectional view taken through a motor'embodying one form of the invention; v Y 1 V Fig. 2 is a fragmentary side view of the manually engageable breather valve control mechanism together with the ground switch; 5

Fig. 3 is a view taken along the lines 3-3 of is mounted in the crankcase Ill for rotative move-- 7 ment on a vertical axis and a drive shaft I6 projects downwardly from said crankshaft through the plate l2 and through the reservoir 1 I. Suitable means such as the tube I1 provides a sealed off passage for-the-drive shaft 16 through the interior; of the reservoir l l.

Formed in the plate I; adjacent aside wall of the crankcase H1 is an aperture or passage [8 which communicates between theinterior of the crankcase I0 and the interior of the reservoir 1 I.-

Formed in a side wall of the crankcase l0 adja- I8 and I9 is a disc valve 23. The spring 22 provided with a portion '24 whichprojcts. laterei ally beyond the peripheral limits o'f the disc valve 23.

Suitably mounted adjacent thef'exterior 'of the' crankcase I!) for rotative movement in a hori zontal plane is a shaft 25 which provided at one end with a manually engageable knob -26; iixedto the opposite end of the shaft 25 is acarn-21.;

A vertical rod 28 is positioned directly below the cam 21 and slidably projects through the pleitelZ, being supported'at its lower end b the portion 24 of the springfl22; ,fl'he'spring 22 maintains the upper end of the-rod 2.81m contact with thecamZL,

fReferring toliig. 2,it will be noted. that the r0d.28 is in its uppermostpositionwhen the cam 21 is positionedas shown, Withjthe portionjthereof having the longestredigus being positioned directly above the shaftjli. Suitably mounted ad: 530 1 11; the .CBHI-ZI.8;HC1.1I1.COI11J3.CU with said cam when saidicamisinj the position shown in Figs. 1 and 2,1-i's. an electrical contact member 29. A suitable electrical conductor 30 leads to the magneto of the motor. The support for the contact 29 is of the type which electrically insulates said contact from theportion of the motor on which it is mounted.

. From Fig, 2' it isjapparent thatrotation the shaft 2 5. by manuarturning 10f theknob' 23 causes the high portion of e camfflfto'move o o engagement with thespring 29' and'jto move into depressingengagement with therod' 128. Depression of the rod 28 to thedot'and d ash'line position shown in Fig. 1, results in-simultaneous;

movement of the spring 22 andithe disc. valve 23 to the dot anddash line position' of Fig l, In this position there is no electrical connection between thecontact 29 and the cam 21'.

Referring to Figs, 1 ands, agear pump 3I is mounted within thereservoir I I. and fixed'to the underside of the. platefI2. The pump 3| is pro vided with gears 32and' 33 which are mounted for rotation on a vertical axis. A cam shaft 34 is mounted in the crankcase I3 forrotation onia vertical axis. The cam shaft'34 is formed with an axial passage35 and with radial passages 35 and- .37 communicating therewith; Projecting throughthe plateIZ and fixedly connected at one end to the lower end of the cam shaft 34 and: having its otherend projecting through the gear 33 ofr'thepumpjl; is a quill shaft-L38. The axial passagegin the quill shaft 38 communicates with" the axial passage-35 in the cam shaft 34, as shown in Fig. 1, and the lower end of the quill shaft 38 is journalled for rotation in the body of the valve 3|,asshown. V

Referring to 3, the gears 32 and 33 are positioned in an oblong recess 39 7 An intake passage 40 communicatesfwiththe recess 39 on one side of the gears 32 and 33 and a discharge passage 4I communicates with the recess 39 adjacent the opposite side of the gears 32 and33. The in-'- take passage extends downwardly and transverse-- ly as shown by the dot and dash lines of Fig. '1

and communicates with an inlet pipe 42 which terminates at a point adjacent the bottom of he reservoir II. The discharge passage 4I extends a predetermined distance vertically downwardly as shown. A horizontal passage 43 communicates discharge passage M is a spring loaded ball check pressure relief valve 45.

.1110, put the; motor. in operation, the knob 26 Q'tur'ned .180. from the position thereof shown .in Fig Z,thereby disengaging the contact 23 from "15".

' 'valve' 23 "with theJcamjZT and'moying the rod 28 and the disc pring 22 to the dot and dash The motor is then started in positiono'f' 1 a the usual m'ahnni When the motor is running, I the oil pump 3|, being driven by the cam shaft 34 through the quill shaft 38, pumps oil from the bottom of the reservoir II up through the inlet pipe 42 and the inlet passage 40 andout through. the discharge passage 4 I, the transversepassage 453; the vertical passage 44, the quill shaft 38, and

te h el pas e e 5.1 he'. zshai 3.

From the passage 35, "oilfund'er pressure is. sq i t out the tra sv rse. pa a e '35 n 31 onto the motor bearings and the other parts in the crankcase which. requirelubrication. M

I The surplusfoil'in the crankcase I0, drains back into the reservoir I I "through: the passage I8.

Breathing action in; the crankcase 10, due to piston displacement, causes movement of crankcase gases from the crankcase-into the reservoir I I, and from the reservoir I I-,' through the passage I 9 and thebreather 2 0, to the atmosphere.

To stop'the running motor it iemerely necesri /t rm e knob ta kt o io shown in'Figs. 15 and 2.; brings the cam 21 into; electrical engagement with the contact 29,, thereby grounding the ignition circuit and, stopping the motor for-lack of ignition spark. Simultaneously with the grounding of the ignition circuit the" rod 28,;the dis'c valve-23, and the spring 22 are-allowedto return tat-he solid line position g posit'iom both the passage-I8 andthep'assag 'lilare effectively and simultaneously sealed off b-y' the-valve disc 23.

By sealing on the passages I8 and I9 the oil in thereservoir I I is trapped therein andcannot fiowinto; the crankcase or out through the breather-i235 Neitlienis' :it possible for any oil draining off the walls of the crankcase to'find its'way-outthrough thebreather 20 as is the case with conventional motors, The" spring '22 maintains the disc 'valve2-3'in effective sealing engagement over the passages I8 and I9 regardless of the position-of the motor, and therefore, whensaid yalvei-s closedz he motor may be tilted a to any'desired positionwithout danger of leakage o'f oil either out the creamer; 23 91 into the crankcase I0 a 1i i Referring to-Figi 4, whereinis' disclosed a modified form of the invention; the various parts are indicated by primed reference characters where the same parts are shown 'inFigel and are indicated by the 'same reference characters-unprimed. Comparing Figs. 1 and l, itwil-l be noted that the manually" operated}-mechariism for opening the disc va1ve23 in-Figl is missing in Fig. 4. In place thereof, is an 'automatic mechanism. which will now be described.

j Referring toFi'g; 4, th'e valve disc 23' is resiliently mounted on one end .of a lever 46. .The lever 46 is pivotally mounted midway of. its length:

on a lug 4 1 which depends from an-L .-shaped bracket '48 fixedto the, underside of the plate [2. Positioned in a recess 49 in the bracket 48,and in engagement with the other end of the lever 46, is a coil spring 50'which urges'th'e'end of the lever with which it is in contact downwardly.

This action of the spring 50 simultaneously urges the valve disc 23 upwardly into sealing engagement with the plate l2 over the passages l 8 and I9.

Supported on the lower end of the'L-shaped bracket 48, as by the bracket is a' bellows assembly 52. The bellows assembly 52 has a cupshaped case -5-3,h-aving an inturned annular flange 54 at its upper end. 'A'cup-sha ped axially compressible bellows 55 is positioned within the case 53 and the upper margin thereof is sealingly connected to the "inturned annular flange 54 of the case 53. Positioned inth'e bellows55, and .projecting upwardly beyond the case '53 into contact with the lever 4'6,'is a plunger 56;

Communicating at one end with the discharge passage 4'! of the pump 3| is a U-shaped extent of conduit 57. The conduit 51' at its other end communicates with the interior of the case 53 of the bellows assembly as shown. In addition to the ball check pressure relief valve 45', the gear pumrp 3'l is provided with a springloaded ball check valve 58 positioned in the transverse passage 4'3. Experience has shown that satisfactory results are obtained when a check valve 58 is used which opens in response to an oil pressure of 12 pounds per square inch. The

pressure relief valve-4'5 preferably opens when the oil pressure reaches twenty to twenty-five pounds er square inch. 7 I

In operation, the motor is started in the usual manner, the disc valve 23 being in the full line closed position shown-inFig. 4. As soon as the motor starts, the gear pump 31' builds up oil pressure in the discharge passage 41' thereof. This pressure is transmitted through the conduit 51 to the enclosed space between the interior of the case 35 and the exterior of the'bellows 55. This pressure urges the plunger 56 upwardly. However, since the spring urges the end of the lever 46 downwardly against the plunger with a predetermined force, nothing happens until this force is overcome. When the oil pressure'built up by the pump 3 l reaches a predetermined level, it compresses the bellows 5'3 longitudinally and forces the plunger 55 upwardly. This pivots the lever 4'6 and causes the valve disc 23' .touncover the passages l3 and I9 and to move to the dot and dash line position of Fig. 4. Experience has shown that a spring '50 and bellows assembly 52 which opens the disc valve 23' in response to an oil pressure of eight pounds per square inch gives satisfactory results.

It is apparent that. the disc valve 23' must open in response to a lower pressure than that which is necessary to open the ball check valve 58. As the oil pressure builds up beyond that necessary to open the disc valve 23', itv pushes the ball check valve '58 open and oil then flows up through the quill shaft 38 and the cam shaft 34' and out the transverse passages 36' and 31' to lubricate the various motor parts. During operation of the motor the surplus'oil in the crankcase drains back into the reservoir H through thepassage, l8, and crankcase breathing action occurs as in the operation of the form of the invention shown inFig.1.

1 When the motor. is's'topped, the oil pressure drops since the oil pump 3l ':n0. longer isoperat to oilpressure which isbuilt up only when the motor is, running, the valve 2-3 is held clos'edby the spring50 at all times except when said motor is running. This provides an automatic control for the valve 23 and eliminates the need for any manual control mechanism therefor.

Various changes maybe made without departing from the s'piri'tj-of the invention andall of such changes are contemplated as may come within the scope of the claims.

1'. In an outbdardmotor, an enclosed oilreservoir; ,an enclosed crankcase positioned adjacent said reservoir, there being a first passage connecting said crankcase withfsaid'reservoirand there being a second passage venting the 'interior ofs'aidreservoir to the atmosphere; a .valve normally closing said first and second. passages; a resilient mounting for said valve normally urging said valve to closed position; a reciprocatable plunger in engagement with said valve; and ex teriorly accessible means for moving said plunger toopen said valve.

=2. In an outboard motor, an enclosed oil reser voir; anenclosed crankcase positioned adjacent said reservoir, there being a first passage connecting said crankcase with said reservoir',.and therebeing a second'passage venting the interior of said reservoir tothe atmosphere; a valve normally closing said first and second passages; a resilient mounting for said valve normally urging saidvalve to closed position;- a reciprocatable plunger in engagement with said valve; and exteriorly accessible means including acam for moving said plunger to open said valve. I Y n 3. In an outboard motor having an electrical ignition circuit; an enclosed oil reservoir; a separately enclosed crankcase positioned adjacent said reservoir, .there;being a first passage connecting said crankcase with-said-reservoir and a there being a second passage-venting the interior of said reservoir to the atmosphere; a valve normally closing said first and second passages; means including a ,cam f'oropening said valve; and means for causing grounding of said circuit when said valve is closed.

4. In an outboard motor having an electrical ignition circuit; an enclosed oil reservoir; a separartely enclosed crankcase positioned adjacent said reservoir, there being-a first passage connecting said crankcase with said reservoir and there being a second passage venting the interior of said reservoir to the atmosphere; a valve normally closing said first and second pass-ages; means including a cam ilorppening said valve; and a contact member inzsaid electrical circuit engageable with said cam "when said valve is closed for causing grounding of said circuit.

5, In an outboardmotor having a crankcase and having an enclosed oil reservoir and having an hydraulic circuit including an oil pump for delivering oil from; said reservoir to said crankcase, there being 1 a passage. connecting said crankcase with said reservoir-and there being a second passage venting the-interior of said reservoir to the atmospherez-a valve normally closing saidfirst and; second passages; and

g means responsivetonpressureaof oil in said by:

simu ci cuit for, o en said valve. 1

and. having an enclosed oil, reservoir and havin an :hydraulic circuit including an oil pump for delivering oil from said reservoir to said crankcase, there being a first passage connecting said crankcase with said reservoir and there .being a second. passage venting ."the interior of'jsaid r se oir to t e a mosphere; .a valve n rma ly closing-said first and second passages; apivotallyinounted lever'conneeted 'at one end to said'valve; and a bellows'inengagement with the; other end of: said lever and responsive to pressure of oil in said hydraulicv circuit for moving'said lever i'n'a valve opening direction.

8. In an outboard motor having acrankcase andghaving an enclosed oil reservoir and having an hydraulic circuit including an oil pump for delivering oil from said reservoir" to said crankcase, there being a first passage connecting said crankcase with said reservoir and there being a second passage venting the interior of said reservoir-to the atmosphere; a valve normally closing'said first and second passages: a pivotally mounted levergresiliently connected at one end to' said valve; and a bellows responsive to pressure of oil in said hydraulic circuit and having a portion in' engagementwith the other end of said lever for moving said lever in a valve opening direction. I I I I 9 .'In an outboard'motor having a crankcase and having an enclosed 'o'il reservoir and having an hydr'aulic'circuit includingan oil pump for delivering oilfrom saidreservoir to said crankcase, there being a first-passage connecting said crankcase with said'reservoir and there being a second passage venting the interior of said reservoir to the atmosphere; a valve normally closing said first and second passages; a pivotally mounted lever resiliently connected at one end to said valve; a pressure responsive bellows having a portion in engagement with the other end of said lever; anda conduit connecting said bellows with said hydraulic circuit whereby said bellows moves said lever in a valve opening direction in response to 'oil pressure in said hydraulic circuit. 7

10. In an outboard motor: an enclosed oil reservoir; and an enclosed, normally drained crankcase positioned above said reservoir, there being a first'crankc'asebreather passage connecting said crankcase with said reservoir and positioned tofpermit oil to drain by gravity therethr'ough from said; crankcase into said reservoir, and their being 'a second crankcase breather passage opening into "the reservoir above theoil level thereof yand'movably mounted valve means positioned for movement between closed position with respect tosai'd passages; and openposition where said passages are in free com'muni'cation"with' said reservoir.

11. In an outboardmoto'r: an enclosed oil-res;- ervoir; an enclosed, normallydr'ained crankcase positioned 'aboves'aid reservoir, there beinga first crankcase breather passage connecting said crankcase with said reservoir and positioned to permit :oilfto drain" by gravity, therethrough from first crankcase into" said reservoir, and there being asecond crankcase breather passage opening into the reservoir-abovev theoil level thereof; movably mounted valve, means in, said (reservoir normally. closing both .of'said passages; a refsilient mounting 'forsaid valve means normally urging said valve means to closed position; and actuating mechanism connected to said valve means for opening the latter.

12.'In an outboard motor: an enclosedoil res,- ervoir; an enclosed'normally drained crankcase positioned above said. reservoir, there being a first crankcase breather passage. connecting. said crankcase with said reservoir and positionedto permit oil-tojdrain by gravity therethroughfrom said crankcase intows'aid reservoir, and there .beingl'a second crankcase breather passage open ing into the reservoirabove. the oillevel thereof; valve'nieans in said reservoir normally closing both ofsaid passages means normally urging said valve means toward: closed position; and means for opening said valve means.

13. In an outboard motor: an oil reservoir; a normally drained crankcase superimposed on said reservoir; a common wall separating said crankcase from said reservoir, said wall being formed with a first crankcase breather passage communicating between said crankcase and said reservoirrand positionedto permit oil todrain by gravity therethrough from said crankcase into said reservoir, and thereabeing a second crankcase breather passage opening into the reservoir above the oil level thereof; a valve in said reservoir normally closing both-of said--passages; a resilient mounting for said valve normally urging said valve to closed" position; and actuating mechanism connected 'to said valve. for moving the latter to open position.

14. In an outboard motor; an oil reservoir; a normally drained crankcase superimposed; on said reservoir; a common will separating said crankcase from said reservoir, said wallbeing formed with a first crankcase breather passage communicating between said crankcase and said reservoir and positioned to permit oil to drain by gravity therethrough from said crankcase into saiidreservoir, and there being a second. crankcase :Ioreather passage opening into the reservoir above the; oillevel thereof; a valve in said reservoir for closing. saidfirst and second passages; a spring normally urging said valve toward closed position; and means for opening said valve. i

15. In. an outboard motor: an oil reservoir; anormally drained .crankcase superimposed on said reservoir; a common wall separating said crankcase from said reservoir, saidwall being formed with a. first crankcase breather passage communicating betweenv said crankcase and said reservoir and. positioned topermit oil to drain by gravity. 'therethrough from said crankcase into said re'servoinand there being a second crankcase breather passage opening into the reservoir above theoil level thereof, whereby the interior of the crankcase is vented to the atmosphere through said reservoir and said first pas; sage; a valve in said reservoir for closing said first and second passages; means. normally urging said valve toward closed position; and means for opening said valve.

16. In an outboard motor having a crankcase and having an enclosed oil reservoir and having an hydraulic circuit including an oil pump for delivering oil from said reservoir to said crankcase, there being a first passage connecting said crankcase with said reservoir and there being a second passage venting the interior of said reservoir to the atmosphere: a valve normally closing said first and second passages; a pivotally mounted lever connected to said valve; spring means urging said lever in a valve closin direction; and means responsive to pressure of oil in said hydraulic circuit for moving said lever in a valve opening direction.

17. In an outboard motor having an electrical ignition circuit: an enclosed oil reservoir; a separately enclosed crankcase positioned adjacent said reservoir, there being a passage connecting said crankcase with said reservoir; a valve normally closing said passage; mechanism for opening said valve, said mechanism including an electrical contact member; and means for causing grounding of said circuit through said electrical contact member when said valve is closed.

18. In an outboard motor having an electrical REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 579,909 Warth Mar. 30, 1897 797,046 Casler Aug. 15, 1905 1,071,068 Maranville Aug. 26, 1913 1,480,545 Cummings Jan. 15, 1924 1,537,116 I-Iowlett May 12, 1925 1,553,149 Doran Sept. 8, 1925

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US579909 *Sep 11, 1896Mar 30, 1897 Charles h
US797046 *Oct 25, 1904Aug 15, 1905Herman CaslerLubricator.
US1071068 *Jun 29, 1910Aug 26, 1913Perfection Spring CompanyLubricating system.
US1480545 *Dec 23, 1921Jan 15, 1924Hattie L CummingsAutomatic lubricator for gasoline engines
US1537116 *Jun 25, 1923May 12, 1925Harry HowlettGraphite lubricator for steam lines
US1553149 *Nov 23, 1923Sep 8, 1925Gen ElectricShaft bearing
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2693791 *Aug 9, 1954Nov 9, 1954Briggs & Stratton CorpBreather for air-cooled internalcombustion engines
US3037582 *Apr 13, 1961Jun 5, 1962Goodall Mfg CorpCombination oil reservoir and bearing mount for internal combustion engines
US3931783 *Oct 3, 1973Jan 13, 1976Brunswick CorporationOil circulating system for marine propulsion gear case
US4926814 *Jul 12, 1989May 22, 1990Tecumseh Products CompanyCrankcase breather and lubrication oil system for an internal combustion engine
US5065841 *Aug 31, 1990Nov 19, 1991Fuji Jukogyo Kabushiki KaishaLubricating system for a vertical shaft engine
Classifications
U.S. Classification123/196.00W, 92/40
International ClassificationF02B61/04, F02B77/00, F02B61/00, F02B75/02
Cooperative ClassificationF02B77/00, F02B2075/027, F02B61/045
European ClassificationF02B61/04B, F02B77/00